The Marines Corps wants to know what will convince you to reenlist - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
Connect with us
[adrotate group="1"]

Military News

The Marines Corps wants to know what will convince you to reenlist

What non-monetary incentives will convince Marines to reenlist?That is what the Corps wants to know ― and it is challenging Marines and government civilians to find the solution.The challenge, announced in an administrative message published Wednesday, was sent out by Lt. Gen. David Ottignon, the deputy commandant for Manpower and Reserve Affairs.“The Commandant’s Planning Guidance…

Published

on

The Marines Corps wants to know what will convince you to reenlist

What non-monetary incentives will convince Marines to reenlist?That is what the Corps wants to know ― and it is challenging Marines and government civilians to find the solution.The challenge, announced in an administrative message published Wednesday, was sent out by Lt. Gen. David Ottignon, the deputy commandant for Manpower and Reserve Affairs.“The Commandant’s Planning Guidance encourages the exploration of an incentives-based model capable of targeting incentives to specific individuals the Service wants to retain,” the Marine message reads. “Moreover, to maintain a competitive advantage needed to fight and win in the future operating environment, the Marine Corps must effectively attract, develop, and retain military and civilian talent by competing with tools and incentives available in the civilian market.” RELATEDBoth Marine Corps Commandant Gen. David Berger and Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Troy Black have said as force design progresses their new focus is on how the Corps must change to retain the better-trained, more experienced force it needs to fight a potential future war with China.Senior leaders may see a young Marine coming to the end of a first enlistment as “just an E-4, you don’t trust him with anything,” Black said in August at the 2021 Sea Air Space conference at National Harbor, Maryland.“That same E-4 22-year-old however, with all that experience, will be treated like a king or queen immediately after walking out that door,” Black said. The Marine Corps sometimes provides reenlistment bonuses into in-demand job fields and takes into account duty station preference when a Marine reenlists.But that is not enough to meet the Marine Corps’ goal.Marines and civilians working for the Corps have between Oct. 25, 2021 and Nov. 30, 2021 to submit ideas on how to accomplish that goal. Those interested in the competition can either team up or submit their ideas as an individual, the MARADMIN reads.Submissions must contain the participants contact information, a title and a description of the idea in less than 1,500 words.A panel of judges led by Manpower and Reserve Affairs will review all submissions and decide on a winner by Jan. 4, 2022, according to the MARADMIN.The winners will be recognized by Ottignon, featured, “in official Marine Corps media channels and publications,” such as Marines.mil and the Marine Corps Facebook page, and will have the opportunity to participate in its implementation. “Our system, that I grew up in,” Berger said in September at the Marine Corps Association Breakfast, “was recruit and replace.”“Our approach now is invest and retain.”

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code

Military News

In the annual football uniform dispute, 2021 Army trumps Navy

Every year, West Point’s Black Knights and the Naval Academy’s Midshipmen duke it out on the football field to fanfare mostly stemming from the rivalry between Naval and Army officers. It’s a weekend that gives service members a good reason to drink, watch sports and argue over which branch is the greatest.But notably for those…

Published

on

By

In the annual football uniform dispute, 2021 Army trumps Navy

Every year, West Point’s Black Knights and the Naval Academy’s Midshipmen duke it out on the football field to fanfare mostly stemming from the rivalry between Naval and Army officers. It’s a weekend that gives service members a good reason to drink, watch sports and argue over which branch is the greatest.But notably for those of us who may be lowly enlisted or non-academy commissioned, the teams unveil new uniforms for the game each year. While some of these get-ups are absolutely magnificent, like the Army’s sexy 2018 black and red alternates, others quite honestly suck (here’s looking at you, 2020).This year, however, both teams stepped up their sartorial game.The Navy, we think, chose to honor the F/A-18 Super Hornets. It’s that or the seafaring branch is paying homage to Top Gun before its springtime sequel release. Frankly, we’re not sure. Either way, the solid dark blue uniforms have pops of patriotism, though the Midshipmen clearly weren’t interested in branching out color-wise. The current roundel, in the form of a white star sandwiched between one red and two white stripes posted on each shoulder, screams Americana, as do the pants with matching red and white stripes down each side. Hooyah.The coolest part of the Midshipmen’s 2021 look is definitely found on their heads and hands (which they’ll need to use in equal measure if they want to beat the Black Knights this year). The helmets feature gold wings earned by Navy pilots, flight officers and aircrew, with a shiny Super Hornet painted on one side.Their gloves read “Fly Navy” and they carry the unit patch for the Strike Fighter Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet out of Oceana, Virginia, on their chests.And while those uniforms are snazzy and heavy on Independence Day-styled patriotism, the Army’s uniforms are just… so much more.The Black Knights pay tribute to what has been a rough year for service members and veterans, marking not only the end of the “forever war” in Afghanistan but the 20-year anniversary of 9/11. West Point clearly took those events into consideration when crafting this downright masterpiece of a uniform.Though the ensemble isn’t as in-your-face as the Navy’s, its symbolism is much heavier.Each jersey carries an “Army” patch and a mirror patch emblazoned with the words “De Oppresso Liber,” which is Latin for “from being an oppressed man to being a free one.” It is the motto for Army Special Forces. The jerseys also carry the collar devices — really sticking with that utilities trend — worn by members of the Special Forces, showcasing crossed arrows and the letters “U” and “S.”“United We Stand” replaces the word “Army” found on the back of regular season uniforms.The Army’s helmets also bear the Special Forces crest and crossed arrows, an American flag, and unit insignia for the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment’s Night Stalkers. The date of the 2001 terrorist attacks are located front and center.Similar to the way small details are important in any military uniform inspection, the special touches found on the Black Knights’ cleats take the cake this year.On top of each boot is a pentagon-shaped logo with the twin towers of the World Trade Center in red, white and blue. While the Navy’s uniforms are sure to please crowds and a couch-stomping Tom Cruise, the Army’s uniforms, like its formidable 2021 team, command respect.Observation Post is the Military Times one-stop shop for all things off-duty. Stories may reflect author observations.
Rachel is a Marine Corps veteran, Penn State alumna and Master’s candidate at New York University for Business and Economic Reporting.

Continue Reading

Military News

Positive COVID test prompts National Guard chief to self-isolate

The chief of the National Guard Bureau, Army Gen. Dan Hokanson, tested positive for COVID-19 this week, according to a brief Friday afternoon statement.“The Chief of the National Guard Bureau, Gen. Dan Hokanson, is working remotely and isolating himself from contact with others, after a positive COVID-19 test this week,” said Guard spokesman Wayne V.…

Published

on

By

Positive COVID test prompts National Guard chief to self-isolate

The chief of the National Guard Bureau, Army Gen. Dan Hokanson, tested positive for COVID-19 this week, according to a brief Friday afternoon statement.“The Chief of the National Guard Bureau, Gen. Dan Hokanson, is working remotely and isolating himself from contact with others, after a positive COVID-19 test this week,” said Guard spokesman Wayne V. Hall in the statement. “All other members of the National Guard Bureau staff are continuing with their duties under the existing COVID protocols, and all continue to be tested, as required.”Hall did not immediately respond to follow-up questions sent by Military Times. RELATEDHokanson was appointed to his current position in August 2020, when he received his fourth star.Pentagon data shows that there have been 77 service member deaths attributed to COVID-19 since the outbreak of the pandemic. There have been more than 254,000 reported COVID-19 cases among uniformed personnel and 2,291 hospitalizations. Military Times previously reported in mid-November that there have been more than 40,000 COVID-19 cases in the National Guard. In September, the Defense Department implemented a vaccination mandate for all service members. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin also issued a memo Nov. 30 stating that Guardsmen who refuse to be vaccinated against COVID-19 won’t be eligible for any federal training or pay, which includes monthly drill weekends.Todd South has written about crime, courts, government and the military for multiple publications since 2004 and was named a 2014 Pulitzer finalist for a co-written project on witness intimidation. Todd is a Marine veteran of the Iraq War.

Continue Reading

Military News

‘Toyotas of War’ is the photo archive we never knew we needed

No one can argue that Toyota vehicles are dependable, affordable, and abundant. But ask any veteran of the last 50 years and they’ll tell you these Japanese automobiles are vehicles of war.In fact, there was even a Toyota War fought in the late 80s between Libya and Chad, named thus for the Toyota Hilux and…

Published

on

By

‘Toyotas of War’ is the photo archive we never knew we needed

No one can argue that Toyota vehicles are dependable, affordable, and abundant. But ask any veteran of the last 50 years and they’ll tell you these Japanese automobiles are vehicles of war.In fact, there was even a Toyota War fought in the late 80s between Libya and Chad, named thus for the Toyota Hilux and the Toyota LandCruiser, which the Chadians selected for their durability and mobility in battle.But one man, Chris, 26, has made it his life’s work to chronicle the use of Toyotas in combat through his Instagram page @ToyotasofWar.“While working for a defense company that was building out Toyotas, I become obsessed with learning and gathering as much info on them as possible,” Chris told Military Times. “Part of that process was compiling any photos I came across. Over time, the page morphed into a way for guys and gals to share their own photos and stories of trucks from deployment.”His fascination with the vehicle’s history is what fuels the feed, which he views as a form of photojournalism. Chris compiles the photographs and archives their unique histories.“I believe the page has morphed into a unique combination of car content and photo-based wartime journalism,” he said. “In a social media world, we provide a nice change of pace. The ‘mall crawler’ and ‘overlander’ content is played out. Too many vehicles have turned into a rolling gear catalogue. We like to focus on the vehicles and how they are used.”His favorite part of running the page, Chris said, is when someone converts to being a Toyota-buyer.“I love sharing stories of Toyota reliability and how much abuse they can take,” he said. “I always get a kick out of the DMs saying, ‘Congrats, I will now be buying a Toyota. —Current Nissan owner.’”Toyota’s DNA, he said, is based upon military vehicle designs. The staying power of Toyota from the Korean War through contemporary conflicts, however, comes down to its adaptability.“Reliability and availability,” Chris said. “They work — and when they don’t, parts are widely available. It’s also important to understand the history of Toyota. [The company] received the design for the Model BM truck and the Willys Jeep from the U.S. Army as part of the Korean War effort. Eventually, Toyota’s version of the Jeep morphed into what is known as the modern day ‘LandCruiser.’”And in fact, his favorite Toyota is the 79 series LandCruiser.“As an American, it’s the proverbial ‘forbidden fruit,’” he added.But it’s the white Toyota pickup truck that became somewhat synonymous with the War on Terror. However, according to Chris, it’s more a mix of coincidence and strategy.“Statistically, white cars are popular worldwide,” he noted. “Last numbers I saw, close to 40 percent of the cars sold in the Middle East were color white. White paint stays cooler in the sun (up to 15 degrees cooler), plus they are are easier to maintain visually (don’t show scratches, and have a higher resale value). Tactically — white provides a decent base color that can be masked/camouflaged with mud mix.”And it’s not just pickup trucks, he added. Toyotas of all shapes and sizes are seen in combat around the world.“Vehicles in all forms are used,” he said. “Sedans, vans, scooters, I have even come across a forklift in use.”This was the case on Aug. 29 when the U.S. Defense Department authorized a drone strike after commanders mistakenly thought they found a white Toyota sedan packed with explosives driven by an Islamic State operative. It turns out that the driver was an aid worker transporting water for his family. The hellfire strike killed seven children and three adults.On Nov. 3, the Defense Department announced that it found no misconduct in a review of the drone strike.The review, carried out by Air Force Lt. Gen. Sami Said, found issues of communication and in the process of identifying and confirming the target ofn the strike, Military Times previously reported. Ultimately, however, it was concluded that the mistaken strike happened despite prudent measures to prevent civilian deaths.The U.S. is moving now to make financial reparations to the family, and possibly help them seek asylum outside Afghanistan.Chris’ last name was omitted from this story to protect the privacy of the @ToyotasofWar account manager.Observation Post is the Military Times one-stop shop for all things off-duty. Stories may reflect author observations.
Sarah Sicard is a Senior Editor with Military Times. She previously served as the Digital Editor of Military Times and the Army Times Editor. Other work can be found at National Defense Magazine, Task & Purpose, and Defense News.

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!