Art-Minded PR Giant David Finn Dies, North American Viking Settlement Dated, and More: Morning Links for October 21, 2021 - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
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Art-Minded PR Giant David Finn Dies, North American Viking Settlement Dated, and More: Morning Links for October 21, 2021

To receive Morning Links in your inbox every weekday, sign up for our Breakfast with ARTnews newsletter. The Headlines THE MESSAGING ARTIST. Public-relations legend David Finn, who cofounded the company Ruder Finn, and who also worked as an artist, died on Monday at the age of 100, the New York Times reports. Operating one of the postwar era’s most influential firms, Finn was involved in encouraging…

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Art-Minded PR Giant David Finn Dies, North American Viking Settlement Dated, and More: Morning Links for October 21, 2021

To receive Morning Links in your inbox every weekday, sign up for our Breakfast with ARTnews newsletter.
The Headlines
THE MESSAGING ARTIST. Public-relations legend David Finn, who cofounded the company Ruder Finn, and who also worked as an artist, died on Monday at the age of 100, the New York Times reports. Operating one of the postwar era’s most influential firms, Finn was involved in encouraging many of his clients to fund the arts, including Philip Morris, Glenn Rifkin writes. (The earliest iteration of the business, Art in Industry, which he started with Bill Ruder , aimed to help companies use art as a marketing tool.) As an artist, Finn delved into painting, sculpture (using straightened paperclips), and photography. “David helped push the boundaries of the communications world, establishing the model for a modern public relations agency,” his firm said in a statement.

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JUST HOW BAD IS FLOODING GETTING IN VENICE? In a look at how climate change is affecting La Serenissima, the Associated Press marshals so many staggering statistics that is actually difficult to decide which is the most dread-inducing. Here is one: Since 1872, there have been 25 cases of floods above about 4-and-a-half feet in the city, but two-thirds of those cases have come in the past 20 years, and five of them occurred in late 2019 alone. (Not good.) A worst-case forecast by the European Geosciences Union has the sea rising in the floating city almost 4 feet by the end of the century. Thirty years ago, when the pricy Moses barrier system was first being developed to manage water, the forecast was for a rise of only about 8-and-a-half-inches. Moses is still being tested, and has a 2023 completion date. [Associated Press]
The Digest
Vikings built a settlement in Newfoundland exactly 1,000 years ago, according to a new dating method used to analyze ancient timber buildings there. “Much kudos should go to these northern Europeans for being the first human society to traverse the Atlantic,” a scientist involved in the study said. [The Guardian]
It has not been an easy time to mount ambitious art exhibitions, but Prospect New Orleans is charging ahead with its plans, and parts of the show open in the coming weeks. Hilarie M. Sheets took a look at the efforts underway for the hotly anticipated affair, which is being organized by Naima J. Keith and Diana Nawi. [The New York Times]

M. C. Escher is not the only artist who inspired elements of the hit Netflix show Squid Games. Anny Shaw examining the many art references that appear amid the violence. [The Art Newspaper]
Interpol reported that the looting of cultural property has spiked during the pandemic. Archaeological sites, which tend to receive less protection than museums, have been particularly hard-hit, and numismatics are the most frequently stolen artifacts, the group said. Museum heists, at least, were down. [ARTnews]
Speaking of numismatics, a one shilling silver coin that was minted in 1652 in Boston is set to hit the block next month at Morton & Eden Ltd. with an estimate equivalent to about $300,000. It was found inside an old tin box at an English estate. [AP/Bloomberg]
Artists Peter Doig, Rashid Johnson, Naudline Pierre, and Henry Taylor discussed the enduring influence of Bob Thompson, the renowned African American painter who died in 1966 at the age of 28. Thompson’s work is currently the subject of a retrospective at the Colby College Museum of Art in Waterville, Maine. [The New York Times]
The Kicker
SHOP TALK. The artists Emma McMillan and Alex Katz, who are longtime friends, just published a conversation in Cultured, and it includes quite a few great quips that range across the history of art. Here is just one, from Katz, who has shows coming up at Gladstone Gallery and Tramps in New York and Thaddaeus Ropac in Seoul: “My brother once had a Cadillac convertible, red with black leather seats. So I said something about, why don’t you get something better like a Bentley ? And he said where can you get something with this much jazz for the money? And that’s Reubens.” [Cultured]

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Post-Conquest Aztec Altar Found in Mexico on 500th Anniversary of Spain’s Invasion

When Hernan Cortes invaded Mexico in 1521, it heralded the end of an era for the Aztec people. But that empire was not finished all at once, and according to the BBC, a new archaeological find shows that some Aztecs managed to continue living after the Spanish arrived. Earlier this week, Mexican officials announced that…

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Post-Conquest Aztec Altar Found in Mexico on 500th Anniversary of Spain’s Invasion

When Hernan Cortes invaded Mexico in 1521, it heralded the end of an era for the Aztec people. But that empire was not finished all at once, and according to the BBC, a new archaeological find shows that some Aztecs managed to continue living after the Spanish arrived.
Earlier this week, Mexican officials announced that they found an altar formed by a family that survived the initial Spanish invasion. The altar was discovered quite deep underground. Archaeologist Mara Becerra told the BBC that she believes the altar was purposefully buried to hide it from the Spanish. Becerra also believes that the family who made this altar were Mexica, the Indigenous people who ruled the Aztec empire.

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Archaeologists spent three months studying an old Indigenous house, particularly the courtyard where the ritual offerings were made. There, the archaeologists found 13 incense burners, five bowls, a cup, a plate and a pot with cremated skeletal remains.
A statement by Mexico’s culture ministry said that the altar was made “to bear witness to the ending of a cycle of their lives and of their civilization.” The announcement of these findings comes on the 500th anniversary of Spain’s invasion.
Mexico is a treasure trove of potential archaeological sites that have not yet been excavated. Even Teotihuacán, one of the most famous Mexican archaeological sites, is only 5 percent excavated. Late this past October, 500 potential archaeological sites were discovered in Mexico using Light Detection and Ranging technology.
However, in recent years there have been exciting discoveries all around the country. In 2020, a newly discovered Aztec tower of skulls, found in Mexico city, drew substantial media attention. But, due to the pandemic, progress made in the archaeological field in Mexico has faced some setbacks.

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Simone Leigh, Who Departed Hauser & Wirth After Less Than Two Years, Joins Matthew Marks Gallery

Simone Leigh, who departed the mega-gallery Hauser & Wirth last October after just 21 months, has joined Matthew Marks gallery. The artist, who is preparing to represent the United States at the 2022 Venice Biennale, joins a roster that includes Alex Da Corte, Martin Puryear, and Jasper Johns. She made her debut with Matthew Marks…

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Simone Leigh, Who Departed Hauser & Wirth After Less Than Two Years, Joins Matthew Marks Gallery

Simone Leigh, who departed the mega-gallery Hauser & Wirth last October after just 21 months, has joined Matthew Marks gallery. The artist, who is preparing to represent the United States at the 2022 Venice Biennale, joins a roster that includes Alex Da Corte, Martin Puryear, and Jasper Johns. She made her debut with Matthew Marks at Art Basel Miami Beach, which opened this week.
The sought-after sculptor’s departure from Hauser & Wirth spurred speculation over whether she had found new representation. Leigh joined the gallery, which has 15 locations worldwide, in 2020 after leaving New York’s Luhring Augustine and Los Angeles’s David Kordansky Gallery, the latter of which had represented her for half a year.

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In mid-October, Hauser & Wirth had prominently featured Leigh’s sculptures in Frieze London. A major exhibition at the gallery’s location in Zurich, her first presentation in Switzerland, was ongoing amid the split. The details surrounding her departure have remained under wraps, and both parties issued gracious statements at the time.
“I love and respect the people I worked with at Hauser and Wirth,” Leigh said. “But I do not feel the gallery is the right fit for me in the wider sense. I’m still figuring out what I want from a primary gallery relationship.” The decision came amid a career-high for the New York-based artist, who will be the first Black woman to represent the U.S. in Venice.
In 2017 she was awarded the Studio Museum in Harlem’s $50,000 Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize, and the following year she won the Hugo Boss Prize, which comes with $100,000 and a solo exhibition at New York’s Guggenheim Museum. Her work was chosen by the prize’s jury for its “longstanding and unwavering commitment to addressing black women as both the subject of and audience for her work, a focus which imagines a recalibration of the outmoded power structures that shape contemporary society.”
Leigh was included in the critically acclaimed 2021 survey “Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America” at the New Museum in New York; she was also featured in the Prospect New Orleans triennial. Her work is currently on view in the group show “Black American Portraits” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

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Met Museum Receives Landmark $125 M. from Longtime Trustee Oscar Tang

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced its largest capital gift in its 151-year history: $125 million pledged by the museum’s long-time trustee Oscar Tang and his wife, Agnes Hsu-Tang. The funds will go towards a renovation project centered around the museum’s presentation of modern and contemporary art, to include 80,000 square-feet of galleries…

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Met Museum Receives Landmark $125 M. from Longtime Trustee Oscar Tang

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced its largest capital gift in its 151-year history: $125 million pledged by the museum’s long-time trustee Oscar Tang and his wife, Agnes Hsu-Tang. The funds will go towards a renovation project centered around the museum’s presentation of modern and contemporary art, to include 80,000 square-feet of galleries and public space to be named the Oscar L. Tang and H.M. Agnes Hsu-Tang Wing.
The long-postponed “re-envisioning” of the Met’s modern and contemporary galleries, first proposed more than a decade ago, has been delayed due to a lack of funding. The project is currently estimated to cost a total of $500 million.

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Oscar Tang, the octogenarian retired financier, founded the investment management firm Reich & Tang. Having served on the Met’s board for three decades, it is not the first transformative gift he’s bestowed on the New York institution. In 1997, he gave $14 million to fund the Met’s purchase of rare Chinese paintings, and in 2015 gave $15 million to establish new curatorial positions and to support programming for the centennial of the museum’s department of Asian art.
Tang is the son of Tang Ping-yuan, a Chinese textile mogul who founded a successful manufacturing company in Hong Kong in the post-Communist era. In the Met’s press release, he attributed his philanthropic activities in part to having been displaced by conflict in his home region and being subsequently educated in the U.S. Tang’s previous philanthropic gifts also include money given to the New York Philharmonic, Yale University, and the Gordon Parks Foundation. Agnes Hsu-Tang, an archaeologist and researcher at Columbia University, has served as a cultural heritage advisor at UNESCO and for the Obama administration.
“Their generosity—while breathtaking in its scope and vision—is no surprise, as it is an extension of their decades-long support of our Museum,” Daniel H. Weiss, the Met’s president and CEO, said in a statement. Max Hollein, the museum’s director, added, “The reimagining of these galleries will allow the Museum to approach 20th- and 21st-century art from a global, encyclopedic, bold, and surprising perspective—all values that reflect the legacy of Oscar and Agnes.”
The couple, whom the Met called “activist collectors” in its press release, described the museum as “an exemplary guardian and presenter of artistic heritages across cultures and time.” They alluded to their longtime support of transcultural and anti-racism initiatives as a driving factor in backing the Modern wing project, saying, “Contemporary art transcends entrenched notions of borders and identities.”

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