Randy Bachman's treasured Gretsch guitar was stolen 45 years ago. An internet sleuth helped find it - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
Connect with us
[adrotate group="1"]

Celebrity News

Randy Bachman’s treasured Gretsch guitar was stolen 45 years ago. An internet sleuth helped find it

Bachman, of The Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive fame, said he was heartbroken when the 1957 Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins guitar was stolen from a Toronto hotel in 1976.”Part of me was lost,” the 78-year-old told CNN, comparing the theft to the death of a family pet.The orange Gretsch, like the ones played by his…

Published

on

Randy Bachman’s treasured Gretsch guitar was stolen 45 years ago. An internet sleuth helped find it

Bachman, of The Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive fame, said he was heartbroken when the 1957 Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins guitar was stolen from a Toronto hotel in 1976.”Part of me was lost,” the 78-year-old told CNN, comparing the theft to the death of a family pet.The orange Gretsch, like the ones played by his idols Chet Atkins and Duane Eddy, was the first really expensive guitar he owned and he had to work hard as an 18-year-old to earn the $400 he needed to buy it.”So I have a paper route where you make, like, two bucks a week delivering the paper, you mow a lawn for a dollar, you babysit someone, you get a dollar, you’re working at a car wash and you’d get 50 cents an hour. This is way, way back,” he said. “So to save the 400 bucks was a big, big, big deal.”Bachman said he used to have a 12-foot-long tow chain that he would use to lock the guitar to something secure if he had to leave it when he was on tour, but on that day, the band’s road manager wasn’t as careful.He called the Ontario Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to file reports, but they told him he’d probably never see the guitar again.Bachman said he’s told the story many times over the years on his radio show and on the YouTube channel he started during the Covid-19 pandemic with his son, Tal Bachman, who had the 1990s hit “She’s So High.”A ‘real-life puzzle’Fan William Long came across the video after listening to some The Guess Who songs on YouTube and decided to get in on the search.Long researches the infamous D.B. Cooper skyjacking case in his spare time and was looking for something different to do last year when he was mostly stuck inside because of the pandemic.”My wife does jigsaw puzzles on the internet, and I thought, ‘I prefer to do real-life puzzles,'” Long said.He conducted elaborate internet searches to find photos of every orange Gretsch he could find and compared them to a video of Bachman playing the song “Lookin’ Out For #1″ on Dutch television with Bachman-Turner Overdrive.Long said Bachman’s guitar had some some distinctive patterns in its wood grain, which he was able to enhance on his computer.He scoured the web for old sale listings and other sources in North America, Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany before he finally found a clue.”I probably went through maybe 300 Gretsch images and I got pretty good at it so I could see them and I could know right away that it wasn’t it,” he said. “So it’s eliminate, eliminate, eliminate, eliminate.”He tracked the guitar to a Tokyo vintage guitar shop, which had sold it, and then was able to find a video of Japanese musician Takeshi playing Christmas songs on the guitar.”You can clearly see (that) all the grain and the marks and the fading on the guitar matches 100%,” Long said.He spent two or three weeks looking for the guitar, mostly after work while watching TV, and then he had to get the information to Bachman.Long lives in White Rock, British Columbia, not far from where Bachman once lived, but he didn’t know how to reach the rock star.He said Bachman was shocked when he finally reached him.”I see the guy playing my guitar, MY guitar, I can tell by the grain on it and I’m stunned. It’s like somebody hit me in the face with a shovel,” Bachman said. “It’s just unbelievable, because I’ve been searching for this forever and basically gave up on it.”Bachman said his daughter-in-law, KoKo, is from Japan and was able to arrange a Zoom call with Takeshi and translate the meeting.He said he was tearful when Takeshi, who he described as the Japanese Brian Setzer, showed him the guitar on camera after all these years.He said whoever stole it took good care of it, because it looked the same as it did back in 1976.Bachman explained that he’d written many of his biggest hits on the stolen guitar and that “It is a very incredible, one-of-a-kind guitar that is part of me.””And he says, ‘Well, I didn’t steal it,’ and I said, ‘Of course, you weren’t even born when this thing was stolen, but you have it,'” Bachman said. “And he said, ‘Well, maybe I was born to look after your guitar.'”Bachman said Takeshi offered to return the guitar in exchange for one just like it.”I’ll give you the guitar, but you must find its sister,” Bachman recounted Takeshi telling him.Only a handful of guitars like this were made and they’re pricey, so finding one in near-mint condition was going to be another challenge.But Bachman had built relationships with guitar dealers around North America during his quest to reclaim the guitar. He’d also amassed a collection of more than 350 Gretsch guitars over the years that he sold to the Gretsch family’s foundation in 2008 for their museum.’It spoke to me like no other guitar’A guitar shop in Ohio had what Bachman needed, and based on the serial numbers, the two guitars were probably made in the same week, he said.”When I first strummed this guitar at the music shop in Tokyo, it spoke to me like no other guitar I’ve ever played. I knew and felt it was destiny — I immediately and impulsively purchased it,” Takeshi said in a statement that was translated by KoKo.He said the guitar’s connection to Bachman made it even more special.”Every time I think about how this guitar has impacted and influenced Rock N Roll music that inspired me and other rockers in my generation, I get so excited,” the statement said. “I’m so honoured and proud to be the one who can finally return this stolen guitar to its owner, the rock star, Mr. Bachman who was searching for it for nearly half a century and I feel very grateful for this miracle happening in both our lives.”Now they just need to make the swap.Bachman said he’s planning to travel to Japan to meet Takeshi and exchange the guitars once the country eases its Covid-19 restrictions.’);$vidEndSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–active’);}};CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;var configObj = {thumb: ‘none’,video: ‘celebrities/2021/08/09/queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds.cnn’,width: ‘100%’,height: ‘100%’,section: ‘domestic’,profile: ‘expansion’,network: ‘cnn’,markupId: ‘body-text_49’,theoplayer: {allowNativeFullscreen: true},adsection: ‘const-article-inpage’,frameWidth: ‘100%’,frameHeight: ‘100%’,posterImageOverride: {“mini”:{“width”:220,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210809155020-queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds-00001202-small-169.png”,”height”:124},”xsmall”:{“width”:307,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210809155020-queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds-00001202-medium-plus-169.png”,”height”:173},”small”:{“width”:460,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210809155020-queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds-00001202-large-169.png”,”height”:259},”medium”:{“width”:780,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210809155020-queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds-00001202-exlarge-169.png”,”height”:438},”large”:{“width”:1100,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210809155020-queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds-00001202-super-169.png”,”height”:619},”full16x9″:{“width”:1600,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210809155020-queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds-00001202-full-169.png”,”height”:900},”mini1x1″:{“width”:120,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210809155020-queens-brian-may-revisits-his-solo-sounds-00001202-small-11.png”,”height”:120}}},autoStartVideo = false,isVideoReplayClicked = false,callbackObj,containerEl,currentVideoCollection = [],currentVideoCollectionId = ”,isLivePlayer = false,mediaMetadataCallbacks,mobilePinnedView = null,moveToNextTimeout,mutePlayerEnabled = false,nextVideoId = ”,nextVideoUrl = ”,turnOnFlashMessaging = false,videoPinner,videoEndSlateImpl;if (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === false) {autoStartVideo = false;autoStartVideo = typeof CNN.isLoggedInVideoCheck === ‘function’ ? CNN.isLoggedInVideoCheck(autoStartVideo) : autoStartVideo;if (autoStartVideo === true) {if (turnOnFlashMessaging === true) {autoStartVideo = false;containerEl = jQuery(document.getElementById(configObj.markupId));CNN.VideoPlayer.showFlashSlate(containerEl);} else {CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = true;}}}configObj.autostart = CNN.Features.enableAutoplayBlock ? false : autoStartVideo;CNN.VideoPlayer.setPlayerProperties(configObj.markupId, autoStartVideo, isLivePlayer, isVideoReplayClicked, mutePlayerEnabled);CNN.VideoPlayer.setFirstVideoInCollection(currentVideoCollection, configObj.markupId);videoEndSlateImpl = new CNN.VideoEndSlate(‘body-text_49’);function findNextVideo(currentVideoId) {var i,vidObj;if (currentVideoId && jQuery.isArray(currentVideoCollection) && currentVideoCollection.length > 0) {for (i = 0; i 0) {videoEndSlateImpl.showEndSlateForContainer();if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.disable();}}}}callbackObj = {onPlayerReady: function (containerId) {var playerInstance,containerClassId = ‘#’ + containerId;CNN.VideoPlayer.handleInitialExpandableVideoState(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.handleAdOnCVPVisibilityChange(containerId, CNN.pageVis.isDocumentVisible());if (CNN.Features.enableMobileWebFloatingPlayer &&Modernizr &&(Modernizr.phone || Modernizr.mobile || Modernizr.tablet) &&CNN.VideoPlayer.getLibraryName(containerId) === ‘fave’ &&jQuery(containerClassId).parents(‘.js-pg-rail-tall__head’).length > 0 &&CNN.contentModel.pageType === ‘article’) {playerInstance = FAVE.player.getInstance(containerId);mobilePinnedView = new CNN.MobilePinnedView({element: jQuery(containerClassId),enabled: false,transition: CNN.MobileWebFloatingPlayer.transition,onPin: function () {playerInstance.hideUI();},onUnpin: function () {playerInstance.showUI();},onPlayerClick: function () {if (mobilePinnedView) {playerInstance.enterFullscreen();playerInstance.showUI();}},onDismiss: function() {CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer.disable();playerInstance.pause();}});/* Storing pinned view on CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer So that all players can see the single pinned player */CNN.Videx = CNN.Videx || {};CNN.Videx.mobile = CNN.Videx.mobile || {};CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer = mobilePinnedView;}if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (jQuery(containerClassId).parents(‘.js-pg-rail-tall__head’).length) {videoPinner = new CNN.VideoPinner(containerClassId);videoPinner.init();} else {CNN.VideoPlayer.hideThumbnail(containerId);}}},onContentEntryLoad: function(containerId, playerId, contentid, isQueue) {CNN.VideoPlayer.showSpinner(containerId);},onContentPause: function (containerId, playerId, videoId, paused) {if (mobilePinnedView) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleMobilePinnedPlayerStates(containerId, paused);}},onContentMetadata: function (containerId, playerId, metadata, contentId, duration, width, height) {var endSlateLen = jQuery(document.getElementById(containerId)).parent().find(‘.js-video__end-slate’).eq(0).length;CNN.VideoSourceUtils.updateSource(containerId, metadata);if (endSlateLen > 0) {videoEndSlateImpl.fetchAndShowRecommendedVideos(metadata);}},onAdPlay: function (containerId, cvpId, token, mode, id, duration, blockId, adType) {/* Dismissing the pinnedPlayer if another video players plays an Ad */CNN.VideoPlayer.dismissMobilePinnedPlayer(containerId);clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);videoPinner.animateDown();}}},onAdPause: function (containerId, playerId, token, mode, id, duration, blockId, adType, instance, isAdPause) {if (mobilePinnedView) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleMobilePinnedPlayerStates(containerId, isAdPause);}},onTrackingFullscreen: function (containerId, PlayerId, dataObj) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleFullscreenChange(containerId, dataObj);if (mobilePinnedView &&typeof dataObj === ‘object’ &&FAVE.Utils.os === ‘iOS’ && !dataObj.fullscreen) {jQuery(document).scrollTop(mobilePinnedView.getScrollPosition());playerInstance.hideUI();}},onContentPlay: function (containerId, cvpId, event) {var playerInstance,prevVideoId;if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘restoreEpicAds’);}clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);videoPinner.animateDown();}}},onContentReplayRequest: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);var $endSlate = jQuery(document.getElementById(containerId)).parent().find(‘.js-video__end-slate’).eq(0);if ($endSlate.length > 0) {$endSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–active’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’);}}}},onContentBegin: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.enable();}/* Dismissing the pinnedPlayer if another video players plays a video. */CNN.VideoPlayer.dismissMobilePinnedPlayer(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.mutePlayer(containerId);if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘removeEpicAds’);}CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoSourceUtils.clearSource(containerId);jQuery(document).triggerVideoContentStarted();},onContentComplete: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘restoreFreewheel’);}navigateToNextVideo(contentId, containerId);},onContentEnd: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(false);}}},onCVPVisibilityChange: function (containerId, cvpId, visible) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleAdOnCVPVisibilityChange(containerId, visible);}};if (typeof configObj.context !== ‘string’ || configObj.context.length 0) {configObj.adsection = window.ssid;}CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;CNN.VideoPlayer.getLibrary(configObj, callbackObj, isLivePlayer);});CNN.INJECTOR.scriptComplete(‘videodemanddust’);They also want to jam together at the nightclub where Takeshi filmed the video that led to the guitar’s discovery — they’ll play “Takin’ Care of Business” and Bachman said he’s going to learn one of Takeshi’s songs.”This guy is my guitar brother. Takeshi is my brother,” Bachman said. “I can’t even talk to him because he’s Japanese, he doesn’t understand me, but when we play the guitar together on Zoom, there’s this connection.”Bachman said they’ve been collecting video footage throughout the experience in the hope of turning it into a documentary. He wrote a song about his lost guitar while working on a new Bachman & Bachman album with his son, and he said it will probably go on the soundtrack.”To me, it’s the most incredible Cinderella story of all time, except that when midnight comes the guitar won’t turn into a pumpkin, and neither will I, and I’ll actually have my guitar back at the end of the story,” Bachman said.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code

Celebrity News

James Kennedy, Raquel Leviss Had a ‘Tumultuous Relationship’ Before Split

Better off apart? Vanderpump Rules stars James Kennedy and Raquel Leviss went through “some real struggles” before they split and ended their engagement. “It was a tumultuous relationship,” a source exclusively tells Us Weekly of the DJ, 29, and the former pageant queen, 26. “[Raquel] still wants the best for him. They had a happy…

Published

on

By

James Kennedy, Raquel Leviss Had a ‘Tumultuous Relationship’ Before Split

Better off apart? Vanderpump Rules stars James Kennedy and Raquel Leviss went through “some real struggles” before they split and ended their engagement.

“It was a tumultuous relationship,” a source exclusively tells Us Weekly of the DJ, 29, and the former pageant queen, 26. “[Raquel] still wants the best for him. They had a happy time together. … She’s also grown as well and this relationship outgrew her. She has grown into being a strong woman.”

James Kennedy and Raquel Leviss Gregory Pace/Shutterstock; Chelsea Lauren/ShutterstockThe breakup “was definitely a hard decision” for the pair, the insider adds, noting that “there was a little discourse after the engagement” that prompted their split.
The British reality star celebrated two years of sobriety in July. During the season 9 premiere of Vanderpump Rules two months later, Leviss called her then-fiancé “California sober,” clarifying that he still smoked weed.
Kennedy “grew up a lot” once he stopped drinking, the source says, noting that the musician “changed as a person” after giving up alcohol. Leviss “was there for a lot” of her ex’s ups and downs, but in the end, Kennedy and the Sonoma State University alum simply didn’t see eye to eye.

“They both want different things,” the insider adds. “They don’t have love anymore in terms of a romantic relationship, but they still have love for each other as friends. … They’re really trying to figure out what their lives look like now that they’ve split. They have a lot of admiration and respect for each other.”
The Bravo personalities made their romance Instagram official in February 2016, two months after meeting on New Year’s Eve. Kennedy popped the question earlier this year.
“THE LOVE OF MY LIFE, said yes. 💍 💕,” he gushed via Instagram in May alongside a PDA photo from the Palm Springs, California, proposal.
At the time, Leviss shared the milestone in a post of her own, writing, “James proposed at the iconic Empire Polo Fields of ‘RACHELLA’ Friday night… and I said YES! I’m over the Coachella moon ✨🌵🌙 #RACHELLA.”
Seven months later, the duo announced that they chose to go their separate ways. “After these 5 wonderful years we had together, we decided we have two different goals and made the decision to call off the engagement,” Leviss wrote via Instagram on Sunday. “We love each other very much, but we aren’t in love anymore. We want nothing but the best for each other so please keep any thoughts positive. Sending Love.”

Kennedy shared an identical statement on his own social media account. Two days prior, he and the California native filmed the season 9 reunion special of Vanderpump Rules. A source later confirmed that the split will be discussed in more detail during the episode.
Shortly after the breakup made headlines, Leviss gave fans a glimpse of herself packing as she prepared to move out of the apartment she shared with Kennedy.
“Raquel’s staying strong,” the first source tells Us. “She has been with friends while also working with James to figure out the best possible route [for moving forward]. They’re trying to be private through all of this.”
With reporting by Diana Cooper
Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories!

Continue Reading

Celebrity News

Jen Shah Claims ‘The Housewife & the Shah Shocker’ Caused ‘Irreparable Damage’

UPDATE Monday, December 6: The US Attorney opposed Shah’s motion to dismiss her case on Friday, December 3, on the basis that “the defendant has not and cannot demonstrate any likelihood of success on the merits of any such motion.” The Bravo personality’s legal team argued in response that the court should consider the government…

Published

on

By

Jen Shah Claims ‘The Housewife & the Shah Shocker’ Caused ‘Irreparable Damage’

UPDATE Monday, December 6:
The US Attorney opposed Shah’s motion to dismiss her case on Friday, December 3, on the basis that “the defendant has not and cannot demonstrate any likelihood of success on the merits of any such motion.”
The Bravo personality’s legal team argued in response that the court should consider the government officials who chose to participate in The Housewife & the Shah Shocker.
“Make no mistake, the Government cannot shift the blame to Hulu or ABC News for the manner in which the final program was edited,” the legal docs stated on Monday, December 6. “The Government and its agents publicly expressed their opinions to the press about a pending case, therefore the Government is fully accountable for all that followed. Like any wrongdoer, the Government is entirely responsible for the entire damage caused by its violation of the rules.”
The filing also claimed that “improper and unrepentant conduct of the prosecution team has caused irreparable damage to Ms. Shah’s rights to a fair trial, free from prejudice.”
Original story below:
After Hulu dropped their The Housewife & the Shah Shocker documentary about Jen Shah‘s legal issues, the reality star is requesting that her charges be dropped as well.

In court documents obtained by Us Weekly, attorneys for Shah, 48, filed a letter that requested her case be dismissed on the basis that the new doc violated the Real Housewives of Salt Lake City star’s right to a fair trial. According to the paperwork, Shah’s legal team is arguing that there won’t be an “untainted jury pool” now that the documentary is available for everyone to watch ahead of her March 2022 trial.
“Ms. Shah respectfully requests that the Court grant her leave to file a motion to dismiss the indictment,” the legal docs, which were filed on Tuesday, November 30, read. “Given both the extensive viewership of Hulu nationwide and Ms. Shah’s public notoriety, a change in venue would not protect Ms. Shah’s rights, nor would alternative remedies such as a detailed voir dire or emphatic jury instructions.”
Shah made headlines in March when she and her assistant Stuart Smith were charged with conspiracy to commit wire fraud in connection with telemarketing and conspiracy to commit money laundering.

“Jennifer Shah, who portrays herself as a wealthy and successful businessperson on ‘reality’ television, and Stuart Smith, who is portrayed as Shah’s ‘first assistant,’ allegedly generated and sold ‘lead lists’ of innocent individuals for other members of their scheme to repeatedly scam,” Manhattan U.S. Attorney Audrey Strauss said in a press release following Shah’s arrest. “In actual reality and as alleged, the so-called business opportunities pushed on the victims by Shah, Smith, and their co-conspirators were just fraudulent schemes, motivated by greed, to steal victims’ money.”
The ABC News documentary, which dropped on Hulu on Monday, November 29, features interviews from two alleged victims, the agents that are part of the investigation and legal experts.
Homeland Security Investigations Acting Special Agent in Charge Rick Patel addressed Shah’s alleged involvement in selling “lead lists,” saying, “The folks that are behind this are pros at what they do. It is disgusting. And what we’d like to tell any victim is, it’s not your fault, please come forward, because we need your help to make sure this doesn’t happen to more people.”

In the November filing, Shah’s attorney argued that that the interviews with Homeland Security Investigations offered details on her case that weren’t previously made public in an effort to “poison the jury pool.”
Although Shah and her team didn’t provide a comment for the documentary, her aunt Lehua Vincent showed support for her niece.
“This is the most difficult time for our entire family. The Jen Shah that I know is a woman who has come from a culture that is deeply rooted in honesty, loyalty and hard work,” Vincent said. “There’s just no way that Jen has the ability to be harmful or hurtful or disrespectful. You are innocent until proven guilty … and I believe her to be nothing but innocent.”

Ahead of the Hulu doc’s premiere, Smith, 43, changed his initial not guilty plea and instead plead guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud, money laundering and obstruction of justice.
“He admitted to hiding ownership and money, defrauding elderly people and lying to the Federal Trade Commission in a deposition, which constituted perjury,” attorney Ronald Richards, who is not involved with the case but who appeared in The Housewife & the Shah Shocker, told Us on November 19.
With reporting by Diana Cooper
Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories!

Continue Reading

Celebrity News

Relive Taylor Swift and Conor Kennedy’s Whirlwind Romance: Photos

Young love! Taylor Swift and Conor Kennedy had a whirlwind romance worthy of a love song — which the musician seemingly documented in her hit “Begin Again.” The Grammy winner was first linked to Kennedy in the summer of 2012 after she was spotted spending time with the iconic family in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts over…

Published

on

By

Relive Taylor Swift and Conor Kennedy’s Whirlwind Romance: Photos

Young love! Taylor Swift and Conor Kennedy had a whirlwind romance worthy of a love song — which the musician seemingly documented in her hit “Begin Again.”
The Grammy winner was first linked to Kennedy in the summer of 2012 after she was spotted spending time with the iconic family in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts over the 4th of July.
Swift, who has been vocal about her love for the family over the years, was introduced to Conor after connecting with his aunt Rory Kennedy a year prior.
The “Lover” singer was contacted by Rory for concert tickets in 2011, which is what started her friendship with the family. Swift later attended Sundance Film Festival’s January 2012 screening of Ethel, which is Rory’s HBO documentary about her mom and Conor’s grandmother, Ethel Kennedy.
“She’s a great friend of all of ours,” Rory told reporters during the Television Critics Association panel in August 2012 after she invited Swift to visit the family’s compound one month prior. “She’s awesome, and we love her.”
Ethel noted at the time that she wasn’t the Conor and the “Evermore” singer’s matchmaker, but she did comment on whether she could see Swift becoming a Kennedy down the line. “We should be so lucky,” the Kennedy matriarch told reporters at the TCA event.

After initially being linked to Conor’s cousin Patrick Schwarzenegger over the American holiday, the “Exile” songstress was spotted spending time with Conor on several occasions during the month of July, before Us Weekly confirmed their romance the following month.
Following the death of his mother, Mary Kennedy, who died by suicide in May 2012, Swift has been a “real shoulder to cry on,” a source told Us in August 2012, noting that the country-turned-pop singer is “really smitten” with Conor.
“She’s obsessed with the family,” a second source exclusively told Us of Swift in August 2012.
The twosome’s romance, however, was short lived with them parting ways “quietly” in September of that year, according to an insider.
“It was just a distance thing,” the source told Us in October 2012 of the “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” singer and the then-high school senior. “No hard feelings. They’re fine.”
Scroll down to relive their whirlwind romance from beginning to end:

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!