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Don’t carry your COVID vaccine card. Here are ways to store it on your phone – CNET

You’ll need your vaccination card to enter restaurants, gyms and other venues across the country.  US Department of Defense For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO and CDC websites. Given the White House’s new vaccine mandates that include government workers, school districts and larger employers, it’s more important than…

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Don’t carry your COVID vaccine card. Here are ways to store it on your phone     – CNET

You’ll need your vaccination card to enter restaurants, gyms and other venues across the country. 
US Department of Defense

For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO and CDC websites.

Given the White House’s new vaccine mandates that include government workers, school districts and larger employers, it’s more important than ever to keep your COVID-19 vaccine card handy. Cities and counties across the country are also requiring proof of vaccination to attend live indoor events and enter gyms, restaurants and bars. That goes for kids, too, who may soon be eligible for the vaccine.The vaccines have proven time and again to be highly effective in preventing severe illness. Over the summer, as the delta variant spread across the US, the number of COVID-19 cases climbed. The bulk were among the unvaccinated, who accounted for over 97% of all hospitalizations and deaths as of July. With the federal vaccination mandates, the White House aims to stem the surge and also to put pressure on those who haven’t yet gotten vaccinated.That rectangular paper card you received when you were vaccinated is your ticket to proving that you’re vaccinated. (And if there’s still room on the card, it can show you got a booster shot from Pfizer, Moderna or Johnson & Johnson when those are available.)But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn’t have a record of your vaccination status. So, what if you lose it, or it gets damaged? We have a couple tips if that happens. But rather than carrying around the card, take a few minutes to add a digital copy of your vaccination card to your phone. By the way, you probably shouldn’t laminate it, since it prevents your health care provider from updating it with future booster shots. Here are a few options I’ve found while researching how to safely store my vaccination card. 

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There isn’t just one way to show proof of vaccinationThe US doesn’t have a single online system or app you can use to show proof of vaccination on your phone. Instead, what qualifies as proof varies by city, county and even business. Some places may accept a picture of your vaccination card; others may require you to use an app that’s authorized at state level.  It’s a confusing mess, to put it mildly. I strongly urge you to take a few minutes to research what your city, county or state will accept as proof, as it can vary.  For example, concert producer AEG Presents will accept a “physical copy of a COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card, a digital copy of such card or such other proof as is permitted locally.” Along with school mandates, many colleges are are also requiring students and employees to be vaccinated. Seattle University, for example, requires students to be vaccinated to attend in-person classes via an online form that uploads photos of the front and back of the vaccination card.When in doubt, look for information on the business’s website, or call the local health department and ask for clarification. This is bound to save you time, headaches and being turned away at the door. Save your card easily on an Android device or iPhoneIf you have an iPhone, with an update coming soon for iOS 15 you’ll be able to add your vaccine card to your Apple Wallet to present to whenever you need to show you’re fully vaccinated. (You can keep a copy in the Health app right now.) Over on Android, you can add your vaccine card to the Google Pay app. I need to remind myself each time where my card is in Google Pay, so I added a shortcut icon to my home screen to quickly find it.Samsung has an app just for you Samsung now gives Galaxy phone owners the option to add proof of vaccination to Samsung Pay, its wallet app. By having direct access to your vaccination record, you won’t have to fiddle around with creating photo albums and tapping through multiple screens before you’re able to show it to a bouncer at your local watering hole.  Samsung Galaxy device users can store proof of vaccination in Samsung Pay by downloading the CommonHealth app.
Samsung
To add your card to Samsung Pay, you’ll need to download the CommonHealth app (Samsung’s partner) from the Google Play Store. Follow the prompts in the app to verify your vaccination status. Once the app confirms you’ve indeed gotten the shots, you’ll be prompted to download a Smart Health Card to Samsung Pay.  That card is what you’ll then show to anyone requesting you show proof of vaccination.  Use your phone to take a clear photo of your cardIs that too much fuss? The simplest way to have a digital record of your vaccine status is to snap a picture of your vaccination card and keep it on your phone. The CDC even recommends keeping a picture of your card as a backup copy.  Taking a photo of your card — front and back — is the quickest and easiest way to store it on your phone. 
Sean Booker/CNET
Simply use the camera app on your phone to snap the photo. You can favorite the photo to quickly locate it or store it in a notes app, a folder or somewhere that’s easy to remember so you don’t have to endlessly scroll your camera roll to find it. Make sure you’re in a well-lit area and get close enough to the card that its dates and details are legible. I also suggest putting the card on a dark surface, while remaining conscious of shadows of your arms or the phone on the card itself.  Here’s an example of one way to save your vaccination card as a new photo album. On an iPhone, open the Photos app, select the Albums tab and then tap the + sign in the top left corner followed by New Album. Give the album a name and then tap Save. Next, select the photos of your card to add it to the album.  On an Android phone, it depends on which app you’re using, but the process should generally be the same. If you’re using the Google Photos app, open the app and then select the picture of your vaccination card. Tap the three-dot menu button in the top-right corner, followed by the Add to Album button. Select +New album and give it a name such as “Vaccination Card” and tap the checkmark button when you’re done. Look for apps based on your location, like ExcelsiorSome states — including California, Colorado, Hawaii, New York and Oregon — offer some form of digital vaccination card. The myColorado app requires you to create an account, verify your identity and then add your digital driver’s license to your phone. After you’ve done that, you can then add your myVaccine record to the app. 
Sarah Tew/CNET
Louisiana’s LA Wallet app takes a similar approach to Colorado’s, allowing you to add your driver’s license and proof of vaccination to your phone.  California’s implementation requires you to fill out a form to verify your identity, after which you’ll receive a text message or email with a link to a QR code you can save to your phone. When scanned, the code will offer proof of vaccination. The link will also include a digital copy of your vaccination record.  MyIR Mobile is another app used by several state health departments to provide a digital copy of your vaccination card. Currently, if you live in Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Dakota, Washington, West Virginia or Washington, DC, this is the app you’ll use.  The Notes app on the iPhone has a built-in scanner that makes it really easy to quickly scan your vaccination card and store a copy. 
Screenshots by Jason Cipriani/CNET
More options to digitally store your vaccination cardI’ve had a large number of readers reach out to me about this article, each one offering advice and guidance about storing a proof of vaccination card. Some suggestions include well-known airport security service Clear. In fact, some concert and exhibition halls are requiring attendees use Clear to verify their vaccination status to attend a show. You can go to clearme.com/healthpass to download the app and get your card added. VaxYes is another service that verifies your vaccination status and then adds your vaccination card to Apple Wallet. I’ve read that you can add your card to the Google Pay app, but after signing up and going through the process myself, I don’t see the option on a Pixel 5 running Android 12. If your local municipality or employer used the CDC’s Vaccine Administration Management System, then you can use the VAMS website to access your vaccination records. I had more than one reader reach out to me about using this system to show proof of vaccination, but without an account myself, I’m unable to go through the process of accessing a vaccination record. Another suggestion I received from multiple readers is to use a scanner app on your phone and store a scanned copy of your vaccination card in something like your OneDrive personal vault or a password manager (almost all of them offer some sort of secure file storage) instead of storing the photo in Google Photos or Apple’s iCloud photos. On an iPhone, you can use the scanner that’s built into the Notes app. On Android, Google’s Stack PDF scanner will be enough to get the job done.This story updates as the national vaccine conversation continues. For more information about the forthcoming booster shots, make sure to read this. We have up-to-date details about the delta variant, as well as delta plus and the lambda variant.

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The pandemic changed our relationship with our phones and Samsung’s upgrading accordingly – CNET

Samsung’s Galaxy S21 (left) and Galaxy S21 Ultra. Sarah Tew/CNET The COVID-19 pandemic required us to to work, attend school and socialize from home — meaning our tech reached a new level of importance in our lives. Although the lockdowns are over, the time we spent at home in 2020 gave Samsung plenty of ideas…

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The pandemic changed our relationship with our phones and Samsung’s upgrading accordingly     – CNET

Samsung’s Galaxy S21 (left) and Galaxy S21 Ultra.
Sarah Tew/CNET
The COVID-19 pandemic required us to to work, attend school and socialize from home — meaning our tech reached a new level of importance in our lives. Although the lockdowns are over, the time we spent at home in 2020 gave Samsung plenty of ideas for how the smartphone experience could be improved.Those takeaways surface in One UI 4, Samsung’s next major software update, which rolled out earlier this month starting with the Galaxy S21 series. 

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“We looked at preexisting features and understood what was receiving more usage because of the pandemic and we reinforced that,” Hyesoon Sally Jeong, Samsung’s vice president and head of framework research and development, told CNET via a translator. The update largely focuses on improving areas like privacy, ease of use, personalization and communication, elements that Samsung noticed had become particularly important as many people began spending more time on their phones during the shutdown period. It’s another example of the broader shift that’s occurred across the tech industry as companies began tailoring their products to facilitate remote work and socialization.Read more: Apple iPhone 14 Max, Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra and other exciting phones to look out for

One such feature in Samsung’s update is the ability to record audio and video during conference calls, an addition that was inspired by remote learning. “We realized that our users might want to record the audio or video while they have remote interactions with their teachers or students,” Jeong said. “So teachers might want to record the audio or video conference to monitor the lessons or sessions they had taught to students.” But perhaps the biggest change that influenced Samsung’s strategy when designing One UI 4 was the increased amount of time we’ve spent on our smartphones. A recent study published in the JAMA Pediatrics Journal found that screen time doubled among teenagers during the pandemic, not including virtual learning. As such, Samsung is trying to make its smartphones easier to look at for long periods of time with cosmetic updates coming in One UI 4. “In terms of visual design, we made a lot of design-related decisions based on the key principle of comfort,” Hyun Kim, head of Samsung’s core user experience group, also said to CNET via a translator. “Because screen time increased, comfort for your eyes [and] reducing eye fatigue has become more important than ever before.”The company made aesthetic changes to its software such as reducing the number of colors in the user interface and adjusting the size and layout of fonts. It also worked with Google to enable screen dimming that’s darker than what was previously possible when using the phone in low light environments. Samsung’s emoji pair feature — which lets you send two emojis at once — was also sparked by the way we relied on our phones for communicating and socializing in 2020.  Read more: Google is still no Samsung, but the Pixel 6 might change everythingSamsung’s software update is just one example of the pandemic’s lasting impact on the way tech companies design and develop their products. That influence can be seen in Apple’s iOS 15 software, too. One of the update’s headlining features is SharePlay, which lets you easily watch movies and TV or listen to music with others over FaceTime. Such functionality would have been particularly handy during the shutdown period when many people were seeking ways to hold virtual movie nights over Zoom. CES 2021 also showcased the best efforts of tech companies to make products that reflected lifestyle changes caused by the pandemic. In addition to Razer’s high-tech face mask and a temperature-taking doorbell, we also saw laptops with better cameras that were seemingly designed for remote work.

Aside from the additions mentioned above, One UI 4 also brings features like a new privacy dashboard, the ability to choose whether to share your precise location with apps, more uniform widgets with rounded corners and more color palettes for customizing your phone’s theme. The software is now available for the Galaxy S21 lineup and will be coming soon to older Galaxy S phones, Galaxy A phones and Samsung’s foldable devices and tablets.

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Samsung Galaxy S22 vs. Galaxy S21 FE: What we’re expecting from Samsung’s next Galaxy phones – CNET

The Galaxy S21. The rumored Galaxy S22 is expected to be its successor, while the Galaxy S21 FE would be a budget version of the S21.  Sarah Tew/CNET It’s been almost a year since Samsung announced the Galaxy S21 lineup, which means it’s likely almost time to see what’s next. Samsung typically announces its main…

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Samsung Galaxy S22 vs. Galaxy S21 FE: What we’re expecting from Samsung’s next Galaxy phones     – CNET

The Galaxy S21. The rumored Galaxy S22 is expected to be its successor, while the Galaxy S21 FE would be a budget version of the S21. 
Sarah Tew/CNET
It’s been almost a year since Samsung announced the Galaxy S21 lineup, which means it’s likely almost time to see what’s next. Samsung typically announces its main Galaxy S devices in the early part of the year, and we’re also expecting to see another new Galaxy phone in early 2022: the Galaxy S21 FE.If you’re a Samsung fan looking to buy a new phone next year, there’s a good reason why you might find yourself deciding between two devices. The Galaxy S22 is expected to be the successor to the Galaxy S21, meaning it’ll be the least expensive model in Samsung’s new Galaxy S family. And the Galaxy S21 FE will likely be a more budget-friendly version of the Galaxy S21. So both the S22 and the S21 FE are expected to be on the lower end of the spectrum when it comes to price.

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There’s likely to be a notable cost difference between them, though. The Galaxy S22 will probably be a couple of hundred dollars more expensive than the Galaxy S21 FE, and rumors suggest it’ll include a sharper camera and faster processor to justify that difference. Still, the Galaxy S21 FE might have an edge when it comes to screen size and battery life.Here’s a closer look at what we’re expecting to see based on the rumors. Samsung Galaxy S21 FE (rumored) vs. Galaxy S22 (rumored)

Samsung Galaxy S21 FE (rumored)

Samsung Galaxy S22 (rumored)

Display

6.4 AMOLED 2,340 x 1,080; 120Hz refresh rate

6.06 AMOLED FHD+; 120Hz refresh rate

Processor

Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 5G

Qualcomm Snapdragon 898 5G

Main camera

32-megapixel, 12-megapixel, 8-megapixel

50-megapixel, 12-megapixel, 12-megapixel

Front camera

12-megapixel

10-megapixel

Battery and charging

4,3720 mAh capacitiy; fast charging

3,700 mAh capacity; fast charging

Storage

128GB or 256GB

256GB

RAM

6GB or 8GB RAM

8GB

Connectivity

5G, LTE, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5.0

5G, LTE, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5.0

The Galaxy S22’s screen may be smaller The Galaxy S22 is shaping up to be Samsung’s option for those who prefer a compact phone, similar to the Galaxy S10e. The Galaxy S22 may come with a 6.06-inch screen, according to specifications published by prominent leaker Ice Universe. The Galaxy S21 FE, on the other hand, is expected to feature a 6.4-inch display, according to information posted on China’s TENAA certification website spotted by MyFixGuide. Both phones are expected to come with display refresh rates that can reach up to 120Hz. If the leaks turn out to be true, the Galaxy S22 will be smaller than both the Galaxy S21 and Galaxy S20, while the Galaxy S21 FE will fall between the sizes of the Galaxy S21 and Galaxy S21 Plus. But the Galaxy S22 could have a higher-resolution main camera The Galaxy S22 is expected to come with a 50-megapixel wide lens, a 12-megapixel ultra-wide lens and a 12-megapixel telephoto lens. That’s according to Twitter leaker Tron, who has a mixed track record when it comes to reporting on unreleased Samsung products. (He correctly said the Galaxy Z Fold 3 would be slimmer than its predecessor, but he also said the Galaxy Z Flip 3 would cost $1,249 even though it starts at $999.99). The Dutch website Galaxy Club, which has been posting a lot of leaks that have yet to be confirmed about the Galaxy S22 series and Galaxy S21 FE, also says the Galaxy S22 will have a 50-megapixel main sensor and a 12-megapixel wide sensor. It also suggests the phone could come with a 10-megapixel front camera.If these rumors turn out to be true, the Galaxy S22 will have a much sharper main sensor than the Galaxy S21 FE, but a slightly less sharp selfie camera. Samsung’s rumored budget phone will reportedly come with a triple-lens camera that includes 32-megapixel, 12-megapixel and 8-megapixel sensors, according to MyFixGuide, which also suggests the Galaxy S21 FE will have a 12-megapixel front camera. 
Sarah Tew/CNET
The Galaxy S22 will likely run on a newer and faster processor Performance appears to be one area where the Galaxy S22 could shine over the Galaxy S21 FE. Samsung’s next major Galaxy S entry will likely run on the newest Qualcomm smartphone processor. Since the chipmaker is expected to unveil its next-generation smartphone processor during its Snapdragon Summit on Nov. 30, there’s a chance we’ll see this new chip arrive in the Galaxy S22 family. Samsung also makes its own line of Exynos processors, but those chips are usually available only in certain markets — not including the US. And that’s a shame, because the next version of Samsung’s Exynos chip sounds like it could potentially bring a big leap forward in graphics performance. Samsung and AMD are collaborating on a future Exynos chip, which will bring high-end gaming features like ray tracing to Samsung phones. But Samsung and AMD haven’t revealed further details about the chip, such as when it’ll launch or which products it’ll be in.The Galaxy S21 FE, by comparison, is expected to run on the Qualcomm Snapdragon 888, according to MyFixGuide, the same processor that powers the Galaxy S21. That means we can probably expect performance that’s similar to the Galaxy S21, which’ll likely be considered a previous-generation product in the not too distant future.But the Galaxy S21 FE is expected to have a bigger batterySamsung is seemingly focusing on screen size and battery life with its next budget phone. The Galaxy S21 FE is rumored to have a 4,370 mAh battery capacity, according to the MyFixGuide leak. The Galaxy S22, on the other hand, is expected to come with only a 3,700 mAh battery, according to leaks from Ice Universe and Galaxy Club. That would make it smaller than the Galaxy S21’s 4,000 mAh battery. But keep in mind that the Galaxy S22 is also rumored to be smaller.In terms of memory and storage, we’re expecting to see 8GB of RAM and 256GB of space. That’s according to a YouTuber called Super Roader, who claims to be a former employee of Samsung’s wireless division. The amount of RAM we could see in the Galaxy S21 FE is less clear. The previously referenced MyFixGuide report suggests it’ll include 8GB of RAM, while a separate report from the same website, based on details that appeared on the Google Play Console, indicate 6GB of RAM. It’s possible the phone will come in two variants, since both MyFixGuide reports say the phone will come in 128GB or 256GB storage options.

The Galaxy S22 will likely be more expensive than the Galaxy S21 FEWe don’t know how much these phones will cost, and we haven’t seen any reports or rumors that provide an indication of price. But based on last year’s pricing pattern, the Galaxy S22 would be about $800 if Samsung takes the same approach as it did with the Galaxy S21 lineup. The Galaxy S20 FE, on the other hand, was priced at $700 at launch, while the standard Galaxy S20 began at $1,000. So the Galaxy S21 FE should be around $300 less expensive than the standard Galaxy S21, which starts at $800. Of course, that’s assuming Samsung retains the same pricing structure as it did with the Galaxy S20 and Galaxy S20 FE.Should you buy the Galaxy S22 or the Galaxy S21 FE?Before a product is actually announced, it’s impossible to know whether you should buy it. Based on the rumors, though, it sounds like the Galaxy S21 FE is ideal for those who prioritize screen size and battery life and staying well below the $1,000 threshold. The Galaxy S22 will likely be better suited for those who want a more premium device with a sharper camera, faster performance and a more pocket-friendly design.

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Smart home holiday vacation checklist: Prep your house to be home alone – CNET

The appeal of the smart home is, in part, the management and monitoring that can happen while you’re out running errands or at work. Your smart home can perform just as well if you’re gone for days or even weeks, with the right setup.If you’re hitting the road this holiday season, we have the tips…

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Smart home holiday vacation checklist: Prep your house to be home alone     – CNET

The appeal of the smart home is, in part, the management and monitoring that can happen while you’re out running errands or at work. Your smart home can perform just as well if you’re gone for days or even weeks, with the right setup.If you’re hitting the road this holiday season, we have the tips you need to leave your smart home home alone with confidence.  Read more: The best travel gifts | Best DIY home security systems to buy in 2021The new Amazon Smart Thermostat is currently our top pick for smart home climate control. 
Amazon
Thermostats If you have a smart thermostat, most types will detect that you’re away and offer a way to change the thermostat remotely. After all, that’s probably why you bought the thing in the first place. It’s a nice perk when you’re out for a few hours or a workday. For longer periods of time or for thermostats that include a vacation mode, it’s a good idea to check the threshold settings before an extended absence. These temperatures are the minimum and maximum your system will allow before it kicks in. To save energy, set them to a bit colder and warmer than you would if you were home.

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Sure, you can adjust the temperature remotely, but the whole idea here is to set it and go. So before you leave, set the temperature ranges on your thermostat so you can save money while keeping your home safe.  Read more: Amazon Smart Thermostat review: A steal at $60High and low temperature thresholds save the most energy when they are set closer to the outside temperature than you would probably prefer when at home. However, they should still be safe enough for your home.  If you have shades or window coverings, it’s best to lower them in your absence.
Tyler Lizenby/CNET
Lights and shadesMy parents always left the TV on when we were away so people would think we were home. I thought it was a weird game of pretend as a kid, but now as a homeowner it makes sense. Lighting isn’t a fail-safe protection against intruders, but having your lights or TV set to mimic human activity is a good start. Smart switches and schedules can do just that. Read more: Our review of the Lutron Serena Remote Controlled ShadesA good rule of thumb is that outdoor lights should be on at night and off during the day, while indoor lights should go on and off in different rooms. If you have smart switches, consider creating a schedule based on time of day that replicates what you’d typically do while home. You can also set smart light bulbs to power on and off intermittently. If you have automated window shades, consider setting them to stay down while you’re away. Keeping lights on might deter crime, but leaving your shades open could turn your living room into a window display for a burglar. The Ring Alarm Pro is our top pick for DIY smart home security. 
Hobie Crase/CNET
Cameras, doorbells and security systems You have plenty of choices when it comes to both DIY smart home security systems and professionally monitored ones. While they do most of the work for you once they’re out of the box, it’s important to give them a quick status check before you leave. Security settings will differ depending on what products you have.Regardless of brand, it’s a good idea to make sure all the integrated motion sensors, cameras, locks and doorbells have fresh or fully charged batteries and notifications correctly enabled to reach the right emergency contacts.  Read more: Our review of the Ring Video Doorbell 4When it comes to cameras and smart doorbells, be sure the lens is free of dirt, cobwebs or decor that might obstruct the view. If you’ve turned down motion sensitivity or set your camera to ignore motion in some areas around your home, now is a good time to put those features back to maximum vigilance. Finally, ensure all notification settings are set to notify the appropriate people at the appropriate times.Be sure detectors and sensors are powered up and ready to notify you in case of an incident. 
Chris Monroe/CNET
Environment detectors Leak, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors offer peace of mind every day, and even more so when you’re out of town. Making sure all of these have fresh batteries, a solid Wi-Fi connection, updated apps or firmware and correct notification settings is worth a few minutes of your time before you hit the road.  Read more: Smoke detector placement guide: Where and how to install sensorsIf your detectors aren’t connected to a live monitoring service, it’s even more important to get a notification sent to the right mobile device. That way, you can ask a friend or neighbor to check out any suspicious alerts.   The iRobot Roomba S9 is our favorite robot helper.
iRobot
Robot vacuums and other small appliances There are several robot vacuum cleaners out there with some version of a scheduling option. If that’s a feature you use often, turn it off while you’re away. If no one’s home to make messes, the vacuum doesn’t need to run. Plus, if you’ve enhanced the sensitivity of the motion detector portion of your security system, a robot vacuum could trigger false alarms.Read more: Our review of the iRobot Roomba S9 Plus vs. Neato Botvac D7 ConnectedYou’ll save battery life and wear and tear on your vacuum by making sure it isn’t running when it doesn’t need to. The same goes for other small appliances that might run on a smart schedule or with smart switches. Run through your list of managed devices to be sure everything is on or off accordingly. 
Getty Images
The human element Yes, smart homes are cool. They can do a lot for you on a daily basis, and they keep you connected to home when you’re hundreds of miles away. Still, smart homes aren’t perfect, and it’s a good idea to have one or two very trusted (and tech-savvy) humans keeping an eye on things. Whether it’s sharing a camera feed, security code or plain ol’ house key, knowing someone could physically check on your home if anything looked suspicious will help you travel happier.

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