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Netflix Tudum: How to watch today’s event hyping Stranger Things, Cobra Kai, more – CNET

Netflix’s Tudum will be a three-hour “fan event” on Sept. 25. Netflix Netflix’s Tudum is a three-hour online “fan event” kicking off Saturday. Named after the distinctive drumbeat at the start of Netflix’s audio-logo, Tudum is set to hype more than 100 Netflix titles with first-look clips, new trailers and conversations with stars and creators.  Netflix has already summed…

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Netflix Tudum: How to watch today’s event hyping Stranger Things, Cobra Kai, more     – CNET

Netflix’s Tudum will be a three-hour “fan event” on Sept. 25.
Netflix
Netflix’s Tudum is a three-hour online “fan event” kicking off Saturday. Named after the distinctive drumbeat at the start of Netflix’s audio-logo, Tudum is set to hype more than 100 Netflix titles with first-look clips, new trailers and conversations with stars and creators.  Netflix has already summed up a lot of what it’ll present. Sections below have full details, but highlights include a secretive reveal related to Stranger Things, which still doesn’t have a fourth season release date yet; a look at the reimagined opening theme to the live-action reboot of Cowboy Bebop (the original title sequence is iconic for fans of the cult-favorite anime); and new clips or trailers from big titles, including Cobra Kai’s fourth season, Bridgerton’s second season, Ozark’s final season, Emily in Paris’ second season, Red Notice, Don’t Look Up, The Sandman and the growing franchise based on The Witcher.

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Other titles that’ll get time in the spotlight include series like La Casa de Papel (aka Money Heist), The Crown and Arcane, as well as films like The Harder They Fall and sequels to Extraction and The Old Guard. And an earlier Tudum trailer also showed Elliot Page will be repping Umbrella Academy, his first major on-screen role shot after he publicly announced being trans.  Here’s everything to know about Netflix’s new spin on hyping its originals, including the full schedule below. 
What is Tudum?  Tudum will be a three-hour online video showcase of some of Netflix’s big original titles. The company has recruited dozens of its stars to show up; they’ll discuss their shows and help release new details, clips, teasers and trailers.This sort of big-tent virtual event is the first of its kind by Netflix, which dominates the streaming world as the biggest subscription service, with 209 million subscribers. But as dominant as it is, Netflix still faces intensifying competition from upstart streaming rivals like Disney Plus, HBO Max, Apple TV Plus and others. Tudum underscores a new marketing experiment stepping up Netflix’s outreach to its various fandoms. Beyond the info included in the event’s trailers and the hour-by-hour rundown released Thursday, there isn’t much precedent for what to expect. But Netflix has experimented with other online fan events during the pandemic, including its own Geeked Week riff on a virtual Comic Con-style event over the course of five days in June. 
Tudum brings to mind events like ComicCon, Disney’s D23 or DC FanDome, which aim to tap into fervor of well-established fanbases. Tudum appears to be Netflix trying to sculpt its own version. But Netflix has yet to cultivate the kind of global, passionate fandoms that rival the likes of Disney’s Marvel and Star Wars, WarnerMedia’s DC or ViacomCBS’ Star Trek. Stranger Things, and more recently The Witcher, have come closest. But other attempts have sputtered, like Jupiter’s Legacy — a superhero drama series that reportedly went spectacularly over budget only for Netflix to scrap plans for future seasons just a month after it premiered. (Netflix isn’t giving up, though: Other projects in the so-called Millarworld of comic-book writer Mark Millar are still going forward, like anime and live-action interpretations of villian-focused Super Crooks.)For one, Netflix doesn’t have the same multi-faceted business model of a Disney, which can pump its fandoms with theatrical movies, spin-off shows, amusement park and cruise experiences and mountains of merchandise. Netflix has been flirting with selling merchandise in its own store recently, but the effort is still in its infancy.  When is Neftix’s Tudum fan event?  Tudum will be a three-hour online stream Saturday starting at 9 a.m. PT/noon ET.  Earlier that day, Netflix will have a separate online fan event, which it’s calling a preshow, focused on Korean, Indian and anime titles, starting at 5 a.m. PT/8 a.m. ET. How do I watch?  Netflix will stream Tudum free simultaneously across most of its major social-media channels and accounts, including its main YouTube channel, as well as its Twitter, Twitch and Facebook pages. (Ironically, though, you can’t watch the event on Netflix itself.)   Tudum will also be streaming on many of Netflix’s localized YouTube channels, in a number of different languages (all listed and linked to near the bottom of the event’s tudum.com website). The preshow focused on Korean, Indian and anime will be on the relevant localized YouTube channels.  What’s the schedule?  Thursday, Netflix provided an hour-by-hour rundown of what to expect during Tudum. That full hour-by-hour rundown is embedded at the bottom of this section.  Some of the highlights include:  Tudum hour one Red Notice — Dwayne Johnson will premiere an exclusive clip of the action comedy also starring Gal Gadot and Ryan Reynolds.Stranger Things season four — Netflix is keeping its cards close to its chest about what Tudum will reveal about the hit series’ fourth season, which still doesn’t have a premiere date. Tudum’s teasers have already shown several Stranger Things cast members showing up for the event. Bridgerton — Cast from the first two seasons discuss the series and debut a first look at season two. La Casa de Papel, also known as Money Heist — Star Álvaro Morte will be on hand, but Netflix hasn’t detailed what to expect. Ozark — Jason Bateman premieres a first-look video at the final season. Tudum hour two The Sandman — The fantasy series, based on the Neil Gaiman DC comic, will release a first-look video from the show as well as character posters.An “anime spotlight” will discuss Super Crooks, Ultraman, A Whisker Away, Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon Eternal The Movie, Aggretsuko and Bright: Samurai SoulExtraction — Star Chris Hemsworth will tease the upcoming sequel of the action movie, which was the most-watched title on Netflix ever (according to the company’s own controversial metrics).Cobra Kai season four — The martial-arts series will release a sneak peek.Arcane — Some details about this animated series, based on League of Legends, are expected to emerge. An “unscripted TV spotlight” is likely to touch on the new Tiger King season.Cowboy Bebop — The live-action reboot of the cult favorite anime show will debut the reimagined opening title sequence. Tudum hour three Emily in Paris season two — The cast will premiere the first teaser of their second season and announce its release date.The Crown season five — Imelda Staunton, who is joining the cast to portray Queen Elizabeth in the award-winning series about the British monarchy, will speak from the show’s fifth-season set.The Umbrella Academy season three — The cast of the superhero series will answer fan questions from behind-the-scenes of filming, which wrapped earlier this year.Army of Thieves — Filmmaker Zack Snyder will help introduce the new trailer to this prequel his The Army of the Dead zombie heist movie, which was one of Netflix’s most-watched titles over the summer.Don’t Look Up — The star-packed comedy will release a new clip from the film, introduced by star Jennifer Lawrence and writer/director Adam McKay.Enola Holmes — Star Millie Bobby Brown will be on hand to discuss something related to the upcoming sequel to the popular Sherlock Holmes-related comedy-caper film.The Witcher — Netflix promises “lots of news” including first looks related to this fantasy franchise, which is set to release the second season of its original show in December followed by a prequel miniseries.The full agenda that Netflix released has additional titles that’ll get time in the spotlight.Tudum agenda by jonathan_skillings What shows and movies will be ‘on stage’ during Tudum?  Earlier in September, Netflix provided the following lineup of titles expected to participate in Tudum, in alphabetical order. Additional titles are expected show up during Tudum, but the previous list included:  AggretsukoA Whisker AwayA Través de mi VentanaArcaneArmy of ThievesBlack CrabBig MouthBridgertonBright: Samurai SoulBruisedThe Chestnut ManCobra KaiColin in Black and WhiteCowboy BebopThe CrownDark DesireDe Volta Aos 15Don’t Look UpEmily in ParisExtraction Finding AnamikaFloor Is LavaThe Harder They FallHellboundHeeramandi Human ResourcesInterceptorInside JobLa Casa de Papel The Old GuardOzarkMaldivasMy NameNew WorldPretty Guardian Sailor Moon Eternal: The MovieRebeldeRitmo SalvajeRed NoticeThe SandmanSex EducationThe Silent SeaSoy GeorginaStranger ThingsSuper CrooksUltramanThe Umbrella AcademyVikings: ValhallaThe WitcherThe Witcher: Blood OriginYoung, Famous and African What stars are showing up for Tudum?  Also earlier in September, Netflix shared a list of celebrities and creators set to participate in Tudum. It includes (but isn’t limited to):  Jennifer AnistonJonathan BaileyJason Bateman Zazie BeetzHalle Berry Millie Bobby Brown Manolo Cardona Henry Cavill John Cho Lily Collins Nicola Coughlan Madhuri Dixit Idris ElbaNathalie EmmanuelKevin Hart Chris Hemsworth Dwayne JohnsonJung Hae-inKai Kim Hee-chul Joe KeeryRegina KingNick Kroll Jennifer LawrenceRalph Macchio Jonathan MajorsGaten MatarazzoAdam McKay Caleb McLaughlin Álvaro Morte Elliot PageElsa PatakyMaite Perroni Maitreyi Ramakrishnan Noomi RapaceAdam Sandler Matthias SchweighöferMaisa Silva Lilly Singh Zack Snyder Song Kang Alejandro Speitzer Omar Sy Charlize Theron Kenjiro TsudaFinn WolfhardWilliam Zabka

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Inventing the iPod: How ‘really big risks’ paid off for Apple – CNET

While joining Apple, the world’s most valuable company, seems like a no-brainer today, things were different back in 2001. That’s when CEO Steve Jobs demanded — not asked — that Tony Fadell join the company to create a groundbreaking device. But the man who would go on to invent the iPod initially balked at the…

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Inventing the iPod: How ‘really big risks’ paid off for Apple     – CNET

While joining Apple, the world’s most valuable company, seems like a no-brainer today, things were different back in 2001. That’s when CEO Steve Jobs demanded — not asked — that Tony Fadell join the company to create a groundbreaking device. But the man who would go on to invent the iPod initially balked at the idea.  “I was like, ‘whoa whoa,”http://www.cnet.com/” Fadell tells me during a Zoom interview to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the iPod on Oct. 23. “Back then to go to Apple you had to be pretty nuts.”In early 2001 while he was developing his own MP3 player, Fadell was tapped as a consultant by Apple, who asked him to come up with different prototypes for a digital music player that would work with the company’s just announced iTunes software. He clearly made an impression on Jobs. “We’re building this, and you’re now going to join us to build it,” Fadell recalled Jobs saying. Of course, Fadell eventually agreed and led the team that built one of the most significant products in Apple’s history — one that is still available on Apple’s site (albeit in a vastly different form). The iPod turned a company struggling with sales and a tiny sliver of the personal computer market into a consumer electronics powerhouse. It also revolutionized the digital music business, effectively destroying CDs and turning Apple’s iconic white MP3 players, and their ubiquitous white headphones, into a status symbol.Most importantly, much of the early work on the iPod paved the road for the iPhone, Apple’s next groundbreaking product. The iPhone changed virtually everything about how we live and interact with our mobile devices and made Apple, now worth $2.42 trillion, the most valuable company in the world. Fadell, who followed up his iPod success by founding smart home product maker Nest Labs (later acquired by Google), talked me through the “crazy” early days of development on the iPod, why he thinks it succeeded and how it somehow endured the test of time. This is his story. Apple declined to add anything to the story. Just a consulting gigFadell, 52, wore a loose-fitting olive polo shirt and a pair of AirPods Max and spoke animatedly in our video chat. The veteran of Silicon Valley, who had stints at Philips Electronics and Apple spinoff General Magic before taking on the Apple gig, recalled those early days. When Apple executive Jon Rubinstein, who had been tasked with creating a music player, came knocking in early 2001, Fadell was already working on his own startup, Fuse Systems, with the goal of creating a mainstream MP3 player. It was a nascent market, with more than a dozen players from different companies including Creative Labs and RCA. The problem: Sales of the devices, which cost a few hundred dollars apiece, only totaled 500,000 units in 2000, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. Fuse itself faced plenty of rejection. Still, Fadell saw the Apple consulting gig as a chance to keep his own project alive. “I’m going to go in and consult,” he said. “I’ll make some money and keep my company going.”He spent roughly seven weeks researching different options for a digital music player, pulling research from his own company. Ultimately, he built three mockups made of Styrofoam, and used his grandfather’s fishing weights to give them the right amount of heft. At the end of March 2001, he presented them to Steve Jobs. Apple veteran Stan Ng had worked with Fadell to prepare a stack of papers for the presentation — this was before the days of slideshows — and prepared him for both Jobs and his reputation for an explosive temper. “Those stories were ingrained in my brain, burned into my brain, so I’m going in nervous,” Fadell said. Jobs immediately took the stack of papers, riffled through the pages and quickly tossed them aside. “Here’s what I want to do,” Fadell recalled Jobs saying, hijacking the conversation and forcing them to dive right in.  Tony Fadell, inventor of the iPod. Composite by Sarah Tew/CNETWhen presenting the models, Fadell did as Ng coached, showing off the worst model first, then the second and, finally, his favorite as the last option.  Jobs seized on it immediately.”Steve picked it up and he’s like, ‘we’re building this and you’re now going to join us to build it,’ and I was like ‘whoa whoa,”http://www.cnet.com/” Fadell said. It’s easy to forget that Apple jumping into this market wasn’t a sure-fire bet. The company’s sales, which came from its Mac computers, were on the decline, and Apple had posted a loss of $195 million in the prior quarter. Fadell, who spent the past decade working on devices with “limited success,” wasn’t sure he could go through disappointment again by building an MP3 player no one would buy. No surprise, but Jobs got his way. ‘Holy shit, is this going to work?’After a few weeks of negotiations with Jobs, Fadell joined Apple in April 2001 and assembled a team made up of Fuse and General Magic employees to put together what would become the iPod. The project immediately faced an uphill challenge. The team needed to work with a lot of new components, including a brand new hard drive from Toshiba that Rubinstein, who oversaw the whole project, identified as the key ingredient for the iPod. Other breakthroughs included new software for the user interface and a then-new kind of lithium ion pack, giving the device 10 hours of battery life that far exceeded anything else in the market. They also had to figure out how to put that Toshiba drive — a (now) old-fashioned spinning-disk type, prone to damage if mishandled — into a portable device that would be shoved into pockets, dropped on the ground and thrown onto tables. On top of that, his team had to integrate Apple’s FireWire file transfer technology so people could quickly transfer their songs. “There were a lot of ‘Holy shit, is this going to work?’ kind of moments,” he said. “We really didn’t know.”All Fadell knew was that he had to get this thing out before Christmas 2001. That’s a tall order, considering it takes about 18 months to develop a new smartphone today. Fadell said he really got started in May — with a launch just five months later. “It was nonstop, seven days a week,” he said. Fadell’s team worked with the industrial design group, led by famed Apple designer Jony Ive, to finalize the look of the iPod. Because the next wave of Macs would embrace white and clear plastic, Apple took the same design language and applied it to the iPod. Along the way, Fadell saw two other projects at Apple scrapped, which fueled him to move even faster to finish (he wouldn’t comment on what those projects were). Then came the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, freezing the nation even as he had to rally the team in that final stretch. “It was absolutely nuts.” That original iPod gave birth to more than a dozen successors.  Apple images composited by Sarah Tew/CNETWhen Jobs unveiled the iPod at an Oct. 23 Apple event at its Town Hall amphitheater in Cupertino, California, the device wasn’t technically done, according to Fadell. The software wasn’t finished, and the company hadn’t signed off on the manufacturing plan. But Jobs gave that pre-1.0 version out to the media in attendance, along with the 20 CDs containing the music that was preloaded on the device. After the launch, he and his team went right back to work. (Reporters who got the prerelease iPod were asked to return them a few weeks later when version 1.0 was released to the market.)None of that stopped the iPod from garnering massive critical praise for its fresh design and innovative scroll wheel. (“Early observers thought it was a speaker,” Fadell mused.) But after the Mac faithful gobbled it up, the iPod, well, hit a sour note. “After that, it was dead,” Fadell said. The secret to the iPod’s successThat may have been Fadell being a bit melodramatic — Apple reportedly sold 125,000 units in that initial holiday stretch — but those sales weren’t going to turn the company around. The willingness to keep going was the critical part of a heart-to-heart conversation Fadell had with Jobs that convinced him to join the company.Fadell asked Apple’s visionary leader if he was willing to go the distance with the iPod, not just investing in this first unit, but to commit to a family of products. Fadell had been through enough scenarios in which a company cancels the first product nine months in because it didn’t want to invest in the next one. In Fadell’s mind, it took three generations to get the ball rolling.  “A lot of people stop midway through the journey, and I wanted to make sure we weren’t going to do that,” he said. Jobs told Fadell he was going to throw marketing dollars at the iPod, pulling resources from its core Mac business. And even though sales of the original iPod and the follow-up version didn’t light any fires, Jobs followed through. “He held up his side of the business, and the rest is history,” he said. It wasn’t until the iPod hit its third generation in 2003, complete with a sleek redesign, that it began to take off as a mass market phenomenon. Fadell said he and Jobs continually pushed each other to take each version further, and he noted that Apple had become the largest consumer of NAND flash memory when the iPod Nano came out.  Steve Jobs introducing the third-generation iPod.   Getty Images”We had this cycle, this heartbeat, every 12 months,” he said. “We took some really big risks to hit it again and again. We weren’t playing it safe. We never rested on our laurels.”The iPod also got another boost in April 2003, when Apple launched the iTunes Music Store, giving people a way to buy music from a catalog of 200,000 digital songs rather than having to rip their own CDs. There had been other digital music players before, but the iPod changed everything. It not only legitimized the category, it absolutely dominated it with more than 80% of the market. Along the way, Apple showed off its marketing prowess and created iconic ads  (remember the iPod silhouette commercials?) to pitch the music and its player. Jobs also paired up with rock band U2 in 2004 on a special-edition, black and red version of the iPod with Bono and The Edge on hand for the introduction.  The original iPod. Connie Guglielmo/CNETBy 2007, a little more than five years after that original launch, Apple sold its 100 millionth iPod. The business peaked in 2008 with sales of 54.8 million units, according to Statista. Fadell was involved with 18 iterations of the iPod. By 2005, Fadell said Apple was already looking at the competitive threat of cellphones, which started packing in music players and cameras. His team played with prototypes that included a full-screen iPod with a virtual click wheel and that essentially combined an iPod Classic and its wheel with a phone. The Mac team had separately built a massive capacitive touchscreen the size of a pingpong table. Fadell said a mashup of all three eventually led to the iPhone, which was introduced in 2007.And Apple changed the world of technology again. Time machineApple still sells an iPod — a $199 iPod Touch that looks more like an iPhone than that original music player — which stands as a testament to its longevity. Fadell, who had a hand in both the iPod Touch and the first three generations of the iPhone, left Apple in 2008, and in 2010 started Nest, which four years later he sold to Google for $3.2 billion. Today, he serves as principal at Future Shape, an advisory and investment firm that works with engineers on different facets of technology.  Fadell, then CEO of Nest Labs, speaking at LeWeb 2013. Stephen Shankland/CNETFadell occasionally goes back to his old iPod. It’s loaded with ’90s and early 2000s alternative music, songs from the Seattle grunge scene, and The White Stripes, who hail from his hometown of Detroit and broke out around that time. Fittingly, it’s a sort of monument to that crazy stretch when he and his team scrambled to build a product that was largely intended to serve the iTunes software, but ended up revolutionizing a market and supercharging Apple’s place in the tech world. “It’s a window of time of my music library, and so you leave it that way,” he said. “You kind of jack in and you’re like, ‘I’m just right back to early 2000s music.’ It’s kind of like a really great mixtape.”

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Scrutiny of Facebook ramps up with flurry of new reports based on leaked documents – CNET

James Martin/CNET The critical spotlight on Facebook intensified this weekend, as several major media outlets published new reports based on the cache of internal company documents leaked by former Facebook employee Frances Haugen.On Saturday, both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal published stories about misinformation and hate speech on Facebook services in India, the…

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Scrutiny of Facebook ramps up with flurry of new reports based on leaked documents     – CNET

James Martin/CNET
The critical spotlight on Facebook intensified this weekend, as several major media outlets published new reports based on the cache of internal company documents leaked by former Facebook employee Frances Haugen.On Saturday, both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal published stories about misinformation and hate speech on Facebook services in India, the company’s largest market. And The Washington Post reported on concern among Facebook employees about the role the site played in the spread of misinformation that helped fuel the deadly Jan. 6 storming of the US Capitol.

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The Post’s report followed stories on Friday by Bloomberg and NBC News that also focused on the spread of misinformation on Facebook in the US, and those reports came on top of similar Friday stories in the Journal and the Times.In its story about the social network and India, the Times reports that in February 2019, a Facebook researcher opened a new user account in Kerala, India, to get an idea of what site users there would see. The researcher followed the recommendations generated by the social network’s algorithms to watch videos, check out new pages and join groups on Facebook. “The test user’s News Feed has become a near constant barrage of polarizing nationalist content, misinformation, violence and gore,” an internal Facebook report said later that month, according to the Times.That echoes the findings of a similar 2019 project conducted by a Facebook researcher in the US, who set up a test account for “Carol Smith,” a fictitious “conservative mom” in North Carolina. In two days, NBC News reported, the social network was recommending that she join groups dedicated to the bogus QAnon conspiracy theory. According to NBC, the experiment was outlined in an internal Facebook report called “Carol’s Journey to QAnon,” a document also referenced by the Times, the Journal and the Post.

“The body of research consistently found Facebook pushed some users into ‘rabbit holes,’ increasingly narrow echo chambers where violent conspiracy theories thrived,” the NBC News report reads. “People radicalized through these rabbit holes make up a small slice of total users, but at Facebook’s scale, that can mean millions of individuals.”The flurry of new reports based on documents leaked by Haugen follows an earlier investigation in the Journal that relied on that same cache of information. The new stories also come after Haugen’s testimony this month before the US Congress as lawmakers in the US and elsewhere wrestle with whether to regulate Facebook and other Big Tech companies, and if so, how. Haugen is scheduled to testify before the UK Parliament on Monday.In a broad sense, the issue has to do with whether Facebook can be relied on to responsibly balance business motives with social concerns and do away with the flood of dangerous content that has spread on its various social-networking platforms. The company’s algorithms drive user engagement, but they can also create problems when it comes to misinformation, hate speech and the like. The issue is complicated by the need to respect free speech while cracking down on problematic posts.Critics say Facebook has already dropped the ball too many times when it comes to policing its platforms and that the company puts profits ahead of people. In her testimony before the US Congress, Haugen alleged that Facebook’s products “harm children, stoke division and weaken our democracy.”Facebook, on the other hand, has said that internal documents are being misrepresented and that a “false picture” is being painted of the social-networking giant. “I’m sure many of you have found the recent coverage hard to read because it just doesn’t reflect the company we know,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in an email to employees earlier this month. “We care deeply about issues like safety, well-being and mental health.”Facebook didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment Saturday on the new batch of reports based on documents leaked by Haugen. In a Friday blog post, the head of Facebook’s integrity efforts defended the company’s actions to protect the 2020 US presidential elections and outlined the steps taken by the social network.In regard to the Times’ report about India, a Facebook spokesman told the news outlet that the social network had put significant resources into technology designed to root out hate speech in various languages, including Hindi and Bengali, and that this year, Facebook had halved the amount of hate speech that users see worldwide.In regard to its “Carol’s Journey to QAnon” report, a Facebook spokesperson told NBC News that the document points to the company’s efforts to solve problems around dangerous content. “While this was a study of one hypothetical user, it is a perfect example of research the company does to improve our systems and helped inform our decision to remove QAnon from the platform,” the spokesperson told the news outlet.

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Surface Duo 2 camera testing: See how Microsoft’s new foldable phone takes photos – CNET

1 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET The Surface Duo 2 comes with a triple-lens camera, unlike the first model which only had a single-lens camera. As a result, the Surface Duo 2 takes crisp and clear photos. But in my testing I’ve found that they’re usually not as well-lit and colorful as photos taken on phones…

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Surface Duo 2 camera testing: See how Microsoft’s new foldable phone takes photos     – CNET

1 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET The Surface Duo 2 comes with a triple-lens camera, unlike the first model which only had a single-lens camera. As a result, the Surface Duo 2 takes crisp and clear photos. But in my testing I’ve found that they’re usually not as well-lit and colorful as photos taken on phones like the iPhone 13 Pro Max and Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3.  2 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET The triple-lens camera consists of a 12-megapixel wide lens, 12-megapixel telephoto lens, and a 16-megapixel ultra-wide lens. This photo was taken with the wide lens.  3 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET Here’s an image taken with the ultrawide-angle lens. It’s clear and detailed, but the sky in the background is a bit dark.  4 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET Here’s a photo taken with the telephoto lens. You can clearly see the text on the bar sign, but the green color in the banner is a little washed-out compared to the same photo taken on the Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3 and iPhone 13 Pro.  5 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET The Surface Duo 2’s 12-megapixel selfie camera gets the job done, but I noticed the color of my hair wasn’t as vibrant in this photo as it was in the image I took on the iPhone 13 Pro Max and Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3. 6 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET Here’s another example of the standard 12-megapixel wide camera in action.  7 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET The Surface Duo 2 managed to snap a colorful photo of this red bicycle in my neighborhood.  8 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET Like many of today’s phones, the Surface Duo 2 also has portrait mode. This photography setting blurs the background to make the subject appear sharp.  9 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET Here’s another photo taken with the Surface Duo 2’s zoom lens. Keep scrolling to see a few more examples of photos taken on the standard wide lens. 10 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET 11 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET 12 of 12 Lisa Eadicicco/CNET

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