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CLIA announces 2021 North America Hall of Fame cruise industry award winners

WASHINGTON D.C. – Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) has announced the 2021 North America Hall of Fame Cruise Industry Awards. The awards identify individuals and organizations whose efforts and accomplishments represent a significant contribution to the cruise industry in the United States and Canada. Award winners were inducted at the Hall of Fame Cruise Industry…

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WASHINGTON D.C. – Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) has announced the 2021 North America Hall of Fame Cruise Industry Awards. The awards identify individuals and organizations whose efforts and accomplishments represent a significant contribution to the cruise industry in the United States and Canada. Award winners were inducted at the Hall of Fame Cruise Industry Awards Gala Dinner during the CLIA Cruise360 conference in Hollywood, Florida on Thursday, July 29, 2021.“The Hall Of Fame winners represent the best of the best -innovative, visionary and committed-this group demonstrates passion, dedication and a continued commitment to propel the cruise industry forward,” said Kelly Craighead, CLIA President and CEO. “CLIA is honored to acknowledge the hard work of these exceptional industry leaders.”CLIA congratulates the 2021 North America Hall of Fame Cruise Industry Award winners:Lifetime Achivement Award WinnerAwarded to an individual who is a lifetime champion of cruise travel and has made monumental contributions to the cruise industry.Scott Koepf – Senior Vice President of Strategic Development, Cruise PlannersAfter getting bitten by the travel bug, Scott was compelled to open one of the country’s first cruise-only travel agencies just two weeks after his first cruise. Over the course of his career, Scott took on many leadership roles including with Club Med, Sitmar Cruises, Cruise Holidays International, GalaxSea Cruises, Sabre, Nexion, Avoya Travel – his impact was wide-reaching. Today, he is Cruise Planners’ Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning leading events, training, and strategic partnerships where he is able to make a positive impact on the network’s 2,500 travel advisors across the country. Scott also gives back to the industry by writing regular sales articles tapping into his personal stories about being a football player, opera singer and shipboard entertainer, leading to his two well-known monikers “The Sales Coach” and “The Singing Salesman.” As a natural entertainer, Scott leverages his on-stage presence with tried-and-true sales advice to inspire travel advisors from all walks of life and all over the world including in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.He has passionately served in leadership positions for National Association of Cruise Only Agencies (NACOA), National Association of Career Travel Advisors (NACTA) and American Society of Travel Advisors (ASTA). Scott is the current chair of the Strategic Trade Advisory and Review Board (STARBoard) for CLIA.Travel Agency Innovator Award WinnerAwarded to a CLIA Travel Agency Member or Premier Agency Member that has demonstrated innovative and visionary leadership in their approach to promoting cruise travel, growing their cruise travel sales, and supporting their affiliated travel advisors.KHM Travel GroupA CLIA Premier Agency Member and a leading host agency, KHM Travel Group empowers, educates, supports, and promotes independent travel agents through a unique program focused on personal support and agent development. Led by a set of thirteen Core Values, KHM Travel Group’s 70+ dedicated team members share their knowledge and passion to help agents reach their goals in the rewarding travel industry.Founded in 2005, KHM Travel Group has always been committed to helping both new and experienced agents grow their businesses through a variety of innovative educational opportunities and resources. Webinars, Facebook Lives, hands-on events, and even a weekly talk show are just a few of the ways KHM Travel Group connects agents with the latest information from CLIA and other important industry partners and associations.As a proud CLIA Premier Member and CLIA Strategic Trade Advisory and Review Board (STARBoard) Member, KHM Travel Group champions the efforts of CLIA to amplify the reach of its campaigns to both the travel community and the traveling public. Over the years, the host agency has also contributed ideas and feedback to help CLIA develop a variety of training tools for its members.KHM Travel Group is located in Brunswick, Ohio with over 4,000 independent agents across the country.Elite Cruise Counsellor of the Year Award WinnerAwarded to an Individual Agent Member who has demonstrated their career commitment to professional development through achievement of Elite Cruise Counsellor or Elite Cruise Counsellor Scholar status – the pinnacle of CLIA certification – with the requisite sales requirements, as well as, someone that has significantly impacted the travel agent landscape through contributions to their agency.Jeannie Lipphard, ECCJeannie began her travel career in 2001 with mentor Diane Mason, ECCS, and by 2005 went out on her own after obtaining her CLIA certifications: ACC, MCC, ECC, then ECCS (as well as LCS).  Jeannie has maintained ECCS status with CLIA since 2005.  CLIA education in the early part of her career set Jeannie up to be successful and within just a few years of entering the cruise travel industry, she became a top producing cruise travel advisor.  Since moving over to host agency Nexion Travel Group (Travel Leaders) in 2013, Jeannie has been a top 10 or top 5 producing agent each year using the education provided by CLIA as well as the support and tools provided by Nexion. 

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‘We have been hit by a fish!’ Lest we forget the great submarine vs. swordfish battle of 1967

Marvin McCamis, Valentine Wilson, and Edward Zarudzki comprised a three-man crew operating the Navy-owned deep-sea submersible ALVIN (DSV-2) in July 1967 when they were attacked by an unusual enemy.“We have been hit by a fish!” one of the sub’s pilots shouted.At a depth of approximately 2,000 feet off the coast of Florida, the research submersible,…

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Marvin McCamis, Valentine Wilson, and Edward Zarudzki comprised a three-man crew operating the Navy-owned deep-sea submersible ALVIN (DSV-2) in July 1967 when they were attacked by an unusual enemy.“We have been hit by a fish!” one of the sub’s pilots shouted.At a depth of approximately 2,000 feet off the coast of Florida, the research submersible, best known for exploring the wreck of the HMS Titanic, was conducting an up-close investigation of a curious coral specimen when it was suddenly blindsided by an aggravated swordfish (no relation to the catastrophic John Travolta and Halle Berry disaster of 2001).The scraping noise bewildered the crew, each believing the sound to be the result of drifting or a depth miscalculation. Looking out the porthole, however, they saw the sub was stationary.“The co-pilot who was watching out through the starboard porthole … recoiled from it,” Zarudzki recalled in a written statement. “Outside the starboard porthole I saw a large fish, apparently captive, violently trying to disengage itself and in the process tearing some of the skin and flesh [from] its back.”Thanks to ALVIN’s curvaceous disposition, the blow delivered by the swordfish glanced from its intended target before becoming wedged in a crevice between the upper and lower sections of the sub’s fiberglass hull.Never having been briefed on what to do in the event of encountering a kamikaze swordfish, the crew launched into a quick conference to ensure there were no leaks or debilitating damage. When they discovered there was, in fact, a minor — albeit unthreatening — leak, the team opted to surface.As the sub ascended from the watery depths, “the pilot requested the swimmers who attach the mooring lines to ALVIN to throw a noose around the fish’s tail, securing it to the [ship],” Zarudzki’s account read. “The submarine was then guided onto the cradle and hoisted aboard the catamaran mother ship.”There, the crew came face-to-face with their sabre-snouted foe, a 196-pound catch measuring 8 feet long that the crew surmised had rammed ALVIN after the sub startled it from its deep-sea vibe sesh.The now-surfaced fish fought violently, severing its own sword before being hoisted by its tail aboard the catamaran.It took the crew two hours to separate fish from sub. Afterward, it was “dressed aboard and over 100 lbs. of steak was deep frozen,” Zarudski wrote.“The following day delicious steaks were enjoyed by the crew.”Mariner myth suggests it was this very incident that yielded the old seaman’s proverb, “I love the fishes ‘cause they’re so delicious. Gotta go fishin’. I could eat them everyday, and my mom says that’s OK.”Remember that? Pepperidge Farm remembers.Observation Post is the Military Times one-stop shop for all things off-duty. Stories may reflect author observations.
J.D. Simkins is a writer and editor for Military Times, and a USMC veteran.

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NatGeo’s ‘9/11: One Day in America’ is a painstaking portrait of horror, resilience & hope

“Are you ready? Okay, let’s roll.”The final words of Todd Beamer, one of the four men believed to have overpowered hijackers on United Airlines Flight 93, match the sustained tone of National Geographic’s latest six-part memorialization of the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.9/11: One Day in America, an all-new, comprehensive retelling of the infamous day…

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“Are you ready? Okay, let’s roll.”The final words of Todd Beamer, one of the four men believed to have overpowered hijackers on United Airlines Flight 93, match the sustained tone of National Geographic’s latest six-part memorialization of the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.9/11: One Day in America, an all-new, comprehensive retelling of the infamous day that launched a forever war and shocked the world, can only be described as heartbreakingly thorough. With never-before-seen footage and all-new interviews, the documentary series from the production team of Dan Lindsay and T.J. Martin (“Undefeated” and “LA 92”) is a devastating yet mesmerizing portrait of America on perhaps the nation’s worst day in generations.While the documentary begins like many accounts that preceded it — imagery of New York City firefighters and businessmen who worked at the World Trade Center — little time elapses before realizing this series is different.Image taken by NOAA’s Cessna Citation Jet on Sept. 23, 2001, from an altitude of 3,300 feet. (NOAA) Audio and video footage spans past and present narratives while highlighting vantage points that range from the casual New Yorker standing horrified outside of a taxi to the frantic personnel inside the actual towers.Calls previously released from American Flight 11 are included, as is an account of one man working in the WTC whose sister and niece were onboard the plane that hit the North Tower. There’s the fire chief who lost his brother after giving him one final order, a mother who hoped her kind-hearted son could be a killer when he needed to be, a security officer who sang people to safety, a man buried alive and left behind, a fighter pilot faced with a decision to kill innocent Americans — and herself with them — before another plane reached its target.Still, perhaps the most beautiful aspect of this oft-agonizing and meticulous series lies not within the footage of witnesses, but in the moments of hope and resiliency that underscore those fateful events and the days that followed.Viewers will watch horrified one moment as clouds of ash, smoke and debris swallow screams and people alike, only to be rejuvenated the next by a woman, who should have died, sitting in a hospital bed happily showcasing a gift from her fiancé, or even a former Marine-turned-firefighter recounting the heroism of a colleague who saved his secretary.Every viewer may know how the story ends, but this immersive retelling leaves no doubt as to why that day 20 years ago should remain prominent in our memories.“This was my world, never to be the same again,” one interviewee says.That same sentiment will no doubt resonate with viewers.National Geographic’s 9/11: One Day in America is currently available to stream on Hulu, and will air in three-episode segments on the National Geographic channel on Sept. 10 and 11.Rachel is a Marine Corps veteran and Master’s candidate at New York University. She’s currently an Editorial Fellow for Military Times.

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The Best Digital Cameras for Taking Gallery-Ready Black-and-White Photographs

When it comes to monochromatic digital cameras, seeing the world in black and white isn’t a fault—it’s an asset. To take black-and-white or monochrome shots on most conventional digital cameras, you’re forced to pick between two imperfect options: You can turn on monochrome shooting mode, which often just re-filters the color in black and white,…

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When it comes to monochromatic digital cameras, seeing the world in black and white isn’t a fault—it’s an asset. To take black-and-white or monochrome shots on most conventional digital cameras, you’re forced to pick between two imperfect options: You can turn on monochrome shooting mode, which often just re-filters the color in black and white, or you can color-correct your pictures in postproduction. However, because of the way most camera sensors encode light—and in turn color—both processes tend to rob the image of crispness and depth. True monochrome shooting offers a solution: Light is directly recorded on the sensor rather than filtered by a Bayer mosaic, the traditional digital color encoding technology. Monochrome-only cameras lack Bayer filters altogether, and some multipurpose mirrorless cameras have “true” black-and-white modes that sidestep color encoding. Both options are capable of capturing hyper-detailed images, all in shades of gray. Here are the five best monochrome shooters on the market.

1. Fujifilm X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital Camera
Commit fully to the retro bit with this high-end offering by Fujifilm, consistently the most photogenic (har, har) camera brand on the market. This model is available in black, silver, and “Dura Black,” but the real highlights are the blacks and silvers it can render through its top-of-the-line X-trans CMOS 4 sensor (APS-C). In fact, the X-Pro3 is the first in Fujifilm’s Pro line to offer a dedicated monochromatic color mode. That doesn’t just mean black and white: You can choose a focal color from an on-screen spectrum and snap away. With its advanced sensor and low-light capabilities, the raw image processing of this camera has to be seen to be believed.

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Fujifilm X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital Camera

$1,799.95

2. Sony a7R III Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera
At its launch in 2015, the Sony 7R II was a towering presence at the intersection of hobbyist and professional-quality mirrorless cameras, and the Sony 7R III features small but appreciable improvements, including faster autofocus and longer battery life. Not everyone may know that 7R series cameras are amazing not only for color but for black-and-white shots as well. You can shoot in one of two monochrome modes: rich tone and high contrast. Rich tone essentially operates like an HDR shot, combining three successive black and white images to create a smoother, softer, lower-contrast hybrid image. For images that are crisper and less textured, high-contrast mode is your best bet.

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Buy:
Sony a7R III Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera

$2,298.00

3. Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera
The a6000 takes some of the muscle of the Sony a7R II and squeezes it into a more affordable (albeit slightly older) package. Released in 2014, this camera also offers high-contrast and rich-tone monochrome modes, plus all manner of other color-adjusted shooting options: posterization (in both B&W and color), pop color, retro effects, partial color (R/G/B/Y), HDR painting, and more. And boy, does it punch above its weight—or rather, its price tag. Its Exmore CMOS sensor and BIONZ X image processing technology still stack up against newer cameras. This is your one-stop camera for achieving all kinds of unconventional effects without sacrificing image quality, and it’s compatible with any E-mount series lens.

Buy:
Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera

$2,298.00

4. Leica Q2 Monochrom Full Frame Compact Digital Camera
It’s in the name: This is the truest monochrome camera on our list. The Leica Q2 completely lacks color filters, meaning black-and-white images are captured directly on its 47.3 full-frame monochrome sensor. Unlike the mirrorless cameras on our list, this is a point-and-shoot digital camera with a fixed lens (Summilux 28 mm f/1.7 ASPH). But it’s going to blow any other point-and-shoot you’ve owned out of the water. Its extremely fast-acting autofocus homes in on subjects in 0.15 second, it can shoot in 4K video, and it boasts an amazingly broad ISO range of 100 to 100,000. You can preview your shots on a 3-inch touchscreen LCD display, then share them via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. Plus, it’s resilient, with a compact, weather-sealed body.

Buy:
Leica Q2 Monochrom Full Frame Compact Digital…

$6,164.02

5. Sigma DP3 Quattro Compact Digital Camera
The DP3 Quattro may be one of the most difficult to pin down cameras on the market. It’s nominally a point-and-shoot, with a fixed 50mm F2.8 lens (equivalent to a 75mm lens on a 35mm SLR camera). But, like the Q2, it’s not your mom’s digital camera. Its finesse in monochrome shots comes from its unique Foveon X3 Direct Image Sensor: Rather than process color through a pixel-based Bayer filter, it captures light through a three-layered sensor, one for each base color (red, green, blue). This gives colors a depth and richness equivalent to 39 megapixels in conventional color filter array sensors, and it lends extra oomph to monochromatic shots. It’s not going to be the best pick for low-light (high ISO) or action shots, but for portraits, landscape, and detail work, it really shines. And if you like to stand out from the crowd, you’ll also like its unconventionally thin and wide body design.

Buy:
Sigma DP3 Quattro Compact Digital Camera

$1,122.86

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