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UAE, Austria sign Comprehensive Strategic Partnership agreement

Declaration launches a new stage of cooperation between the two countries. His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, and Sebastian Kurz, Federal Chancellor of the Republic of Austria, today attended the signing of the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between the UAE…

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UAE, Austria sign Comprehensive Strategic Partnership agreement

Declaration launches a new stage of cooperation between the two countries.

His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, and Sebastian Kurz, Federal Chancellor of the Republic of Austria, today attended the signing of the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between the UAE and Austria.
The joint declaration made by the two countries reaffirms their commitment to expanding their relations and launching a new stage of cooperation to achieve their shared goals and drive growth in their countries.
The agreement was signed by Dr. Sultan bin Ahmed Al Jaber, UAE Minister of Industry and Advanced Technology, and Alexander Schallenberg, Austria’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, in the presence of Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan; Sheikh Mohammed bin Hamad bin Tahnoun Al Nahyan, Chairman of Abu Dhabi Airports; Mohamed Mubarak Al Mazrouei, Under-Secretary of the Crown Prince Court of Abu Dhabi, Ibrahim Salem Al Musharakh, UAE Ambassador to Austria, Mag. Gernot Blumel, Austria’s Minister of Finance, and Dr. Margarete Schramböck, Minister for Digital and Economic Affairs.
Below is the full text of the joint declaration:
Areas of Focused Cooperation

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Kuwait Times September 27, 2021

Daily E- Paper – Kuwait Times   Click above icon to download full news paper   The post Kuwait Times September 27, 2021 appeared first on Kuwait Times.

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Kuwait Times September 27, 2021

Daily E- Paper – Kuwait Times

 

Click above icon to download full news paper

 

The post Kuwait Times September 27, 2021 appeared first on Kuwait Times.

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MP says exiled activists will be pardoned soon

The National AssemblyBy B Izzak KUWAIT: MP Mohannad Al-Sayer said yesterday he believes that a decision to pardon a number of opposition ex-MPs and activists – who have been living abroad for several years – will be issued soon. “We will be pleased shortly with the return of our brothers who are living abroad,” Sayer…

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MP says exiled activists will be pardoned soon

The National AssemblyBy B Izzak
KUWAIT: MP Mohannad Al-Sayer said yesterday he believes that a decision to pardon a number of opposition ex-MPs and activists – who have been living abroad for several years – will be issued soon. “We will be pleased shortly with the return of our brothers who are living abroad,” Sayer said in reference to around a dozen opposition figures who have been living in self-exile for over three years in Turkey.
The opposition figures left the country in the summer of 2018 to escape harsh jail terms issued by the state’s highest court, which convicted them of taking part in storming the National Assembly building during an anti-corruption protest in Nov 2011. Sayer said opposition lawmakers support any initiative for cooperation on this issue and reject politicizing it.
The opposition has been pressing to pass legislation in the Assembly that would issue a general pardon to the exiles and other prisoners jailed on political and freedom of expression charges. But their attempt has so far been unsuccessful and efforts are currently underway to secure a decree by HH the Amir to pardon them.
Last week, nine of the exiled figures issued a statement in which they criticized the failed efforts of the opposition MPs and accepted a reported initiative to pardon them as part of a dialogue for national reconciliation. Former MP Faisal Al-Mislem, one of the exiles, wrote on Twitter yesterday that if no pardon is issued, then opposition MPs must submit the general pardon legislation in the first session of the Assembly’s new term in late October.
Meanwhile, MP Abdulkarim Al-Kandari yesterday submitted a draft law calling to set up a new agency to track down and recover public funds that had been stolen and deposited in special accounts abroad or invested in projects. The bill proposes the agency should be chaired by a senior judge.
The agency will follow verdicts issued by Kuwaiti or foreign courts regarding public funds and then work to bring them back. The lawmaker said public funds have been the target of theft and embezzlement for many years, and charged that the government has not paid attention to recover such funds, which necessitates the establishment of a special agency.
 

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Iceland almost gets female-majority parliament

Iceland briefly celebrated electing a female-majority parliament on Sunday, before a recount showed there will still be more men than women in the chamber, state broadcaster RUV reported. The initial vote count had female candidates winning 33 seats in Iceland’s 63-seat parliament, the Althing, in an election that saw centrist parties make the biggest gains.…

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Iceland almost gets female-majority parliament

Iceland briefly celebrated electing a female-majority parliament on Sunday, before a recount showed there will still be more men than women in the chamber, state broadcaster RUV reported.
The initial vote count had female candidates winning 33 seats in Iceland’s 63-seat parliament, the Althing, in an election that saw centrist parties make the biggest gains.
Hours later, a recount in northwestern Iceland changed the outcome, leaving female candidates with 30 seats, a tally previously reached at Iceland’s second-most recent election, in 2016.
Still, at almost 48 percent of the total, that is the highest percentage for women legislators in Europe. On the continent, Sweden and Finland have 47 percent and 46 percent women’s representation in parliament, respectively.
According to the Inter-Parliamentary Union, Rwanda leads the world with women making up 61 percent of its Chamber of Deputies, with Cuba, Nicaragua and Mexico on or just over the 50 percent mark. Worldwide, the organisation says just over a quarter of legislators are women.
Iceland, a North Atlantic island of 371,000 people, was ranked the most gender-equal country in the world for the 12th year running in a World Economic Forum (WEF) report released in March.
“The female victory remains the big story of these elections,” politics professor Olafur Hardarson told RUV after the recount.
Iceland’s Finance Minister, leader and top candidate of the Icelandic Independence Party Bjarni Benediktsson (left) and party delegates react to the results being shown on a monitor in Iceland’s capital Reykjavik, on September 25, 2021, during the country’s parliamentary elections to elect members of the Althing [Halldor Kolbeins/ AFP]Iceland’s voting system is divided into six regions and the recount in western Iceland was held following a tight contest in the northwest constituency, according to Ingi Tryggvason, the head of the electoral commission there.
“We decided to hold a recount because the result was so close,” Tryggvason told the AFP news agency, adding that no one had requested the recount.
The move did not affect the overall election result.
The three parties in the outgoing coalition government led by Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir won a total of 37 seats in Saturday’s vote, two more than in the last election.
The coalition has brought Iceland four years of stability after 10 years of political crises, but Jakobsdottir’s Left-Green Movement emerged weakened after losing ground to its right-wing partners, which both posted strong showings.
The Left-Green Movement won only eight seats, three fewer than in 2017, raising questions about Jakobsdottir’s future as prime minister.
The centre-right Independence Party took the largest share of votes, winning 16 seats, seven of them held by women. The centrist Progressive Party celebrated the biggest gain, winning 13 seats, five more than last time.
The three parties have not announced whether they will work together for another term, but given the strong support from voters, it appears likely. It will take days, if not weeks, for a new government to be formed and announced.
Iceland’s Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir and top candidate of the Left-Green Movement casts a ballot at a polling station in Iceland’s capital Reykjavik on September 25, 2021 [Halldor Kolbeins/ AFP]Speaking to private broadcaster Stod 2 on Sunday, Jakobsdottir refused to be drawn on the coalition’s future discussions, saying only that her government had received “remarkable” support in the election.
Progressive Party leader Sigurdur Ingi Johannsson and Independence Party leader Bjarni Benediktsson said they were open to discussing a continuation of the coalition.
Benediktsson told Stod 2 it was “normal for parties that have worked together for four years and had good personal relations” to try to continue together.
But he told public broadcaster RUV he was not sure they would succeed.
He also said he would “not demand” the post of prime minister.
The unusual coalition mixing left and right came about in a bid to bring stability after years of political upheaval.
Deep public distrust of politicians amid repeated scandals sent Icelanders to the polls five times between 2007 and 2017.
This is the first time since 2003 that a government has retained its majority.
Climate change had ranked high on the election agenda in Iceland due to an exceptionally warm summer by Icelandic standards – with 59 days of temperatures above 20C (68F) – and shrinking glaciers.
But that did not appear to have translated into increased support for any of the four left-leaning parties that campaigned to cut carbon emissions by more than Iceland is committed to under the Paris Climate Agreement.
One candidate who saw her victory overturned by the recount was law student Lenya Run Karim, a 21-year-old daughter of Kurdish immigrants who ran for the anti-establishment Pirate Party.
“These were a good nine hours,” said Karim, who would have been Iceland’s youngest-ever legislator.

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