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Best Buy Sunday sale: Apple Watch price slashed, 82-inch 7 Series Samsung for $1400 and more – CNET

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day 2021, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal. Best Buy is jumping the queue on Prime Day with a number of “Flash Sales” you can take advantage, including solid discounts on the latest Apple Watch Series 6 (if you…

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Best Buy Sunday sale: Apple Watch price slashed, 82-inch 7 Series Samsung for $1400 and more     – CNET

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day 2021, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

Best Buy is jumping the queue on Prime Day with a number of “Flash Sales” you can take advantage, including solid discounts on the latest Apple Watch Series 6 (if you like red, at least). You can expect that Best Buy will drop many more deals in the next few days as the Prime Day sales heat up. Below, we’ve highlighted some of our favorite deals as of Father’s Day (June 20).

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OnePlus Nord 2: A great 5G phone for an affordable £399 starting price – CNET

The OnePlus Nord 2, also called the “flagship killer,” has some impressive specs and performs well all round.  Andrew Hoyle/CNET OnePlus calls its brand-new Nord 2 the “flagship killer,” and I get why. This phone has impressive specs, performs well and when paired with a reasonable starting price (only £399 here in the UK), it’s…

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OnePlus Nord 2: A great 5G phone for an affordable £399 starting price     – CNET

The OnePlus Nord 2, also called the “flagship killer,” has some impressive specs and performs well all round. 
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
OnePlus calls its brand-new Nord 2 the “flagship killer,” and I get why. This phone has impressive specs, performs well and when paired with a reasonable starting price (only £399 here in the UK), it’s designed to offer everything you’d need from a phone without emptying your bank account. A powerful processor, a solid dual rear camera setup, 5G connectivity, super fast charging — and it’s not bad to look at either. The phone became available for purchase yesterday for those living in continental Europe, the UK and India.Read more: OnePlus Nord 2 vs. Nord vs. Nord CE vs. OnePlus 9: Comparing OnePlus’ latest phonesLike the previous Nord — and the cheaper Nord CE, launched just a few weeks back — the Nord 2 will not be on sale in the US. It’s destined for the UK and wider Europe, where it’ll cost £399 for the version with 8GB of RAM and 128GB of storage or £469 with 12GB of RAM and 256GB of storage. For reference, £399 converts to about $540 or AU$740. But no, it doesn’t really “kill” any flagships. It’s not as powerful as a “true” flagship like the iPhone 12 Pro Max or S21 Ultra, nor will its camera skills attract the world’s most demanding photographers. The flagship that I feel is most at risk is OnePlus’s own 9 series, which shares many features with the Nord 2, yet has a much higher starting price of £629 ($729). 

I’ve spent a short amount of time with the Nord 2 ahead of its unveiling, and here are the five things I like most about it. A powerful MediaTek processor  OnePlus has typically used Qualcomm’s Snapdragon line of processors for its phones but it went with MediaTek’s Dimensity 1200-AI chip for the Nord 2. You’ll notice absolutely no difference in use — it’s the same as any other Android phone — but you will notice that it’s surprisingly powerful for the price.  While it’s not up there with the iPhone 12 Pro Max in terms of benchmarks, it did beat the Pixel 5 and wasn’t far below the more expensive OnePlus 9. It’s certainly powerful enough for gaming, photo editing and video streaming and navigating around the Android 11 interface is smooth and stutter free. The OnePlus Nord 2 houses a powerful processor, a dual rear camera setup, 5G connectivity and super fast charging. 
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
Android 11 software The Nord 2 runs Android 11 at its core, over which OnePlus has slapped its usual Oxygen software. I really like OnePlus’s software as it’s neat, easy to use and doesn’t try and load the phone up with too many bundled services and bloatware. As a result, the phone remains nippy and trouble-free for longer. It’s particularly important on lower and midrange phones that might not cope as well with being bogged down by services. The result here is a phone with smooth performance that I expect to remain for some time to come.  OnePlus says it’s guaranteed to get at least two years of Android upgrades — so an update to Android 12 this fall and Android 13 next year is a given — with an additional year of security updates after that.  The OnePlus Nord 2 runs Android 11 software. 
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
Incredible fast charging The Nord 2 has the same 65-watt fast charging seen on the OnePlus 9 series and it’s amazing. It’ll take the phone from empty to full in only about 30 minutes, which makes it amazing for giving it a quick boost before you head out from home. The 4,500-mAh battery should still give you a day of use from a charge, but when you can recharge so quickly, battery life becomes somewhat less of an issue. Even better is that a 65-watt fast charger comes in the box, so you don’t need to scour Amazon for one. What the phone doesn’t have is wireless charging, but I don’t see that as a particular problem.  The OnePlus Nord 2 has speedy charging with 65-watt support.
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
Vibrant, sharp display The Nord 2’s display measures 6.43 inches and boasts a resolution of 2,400×1,080 pixels, which is sufficient to make tiny text look nice and sharp. It’s an AMOLED panel, making it extremely vibrant too: great for videos, photos or playing whatever colorful game is currently making the rounds on the Google Play Store. It has a 90Hz refresh rate which is a touch lower than the 120Hz of the OnePlus 9 series, but I doubt you’d be able to tell any real difference in day-to-day use. It’s silky smooth when scrolling around the interface, but you can also turn it down to a more regular 60Hz, which will apparently help save battery life.  The main cameras on the OnePlus Nord 2 are a 50-megapixel lens combined with a 8-megapixel super-wide lens.
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
Decent rear cameras We haven’t done our full suite of camera tests yet, but what we’ve seen from the cameras so far looks good. The main sensor is a 50-megapixel affair — the same one seen in the OnePlus 9’s ultrawide camera. Outdoor images look well-exposed, with plenty of detail and natural-looking colors.  OnePlus Nord 2 outdoor camera test, standard lens.
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
OnePlus Nord 2 outdoor camera test, standard lens.
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
OnePlus Nord 2 outdoor camera test, super-wide lens.
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
OnePlus Nord 2 outdoor camera test, standard lens with 2x digital zoom.
Andrew Hoyle/CNET
The 8-megapixel super-wide lens is noticeably less detailed, but it too seems capable of capturing good-looking outdoor images. There’s an on-screen option for 2x zoom but there isn’t a zoom lens, so that 2x is based on digitally cropping the shot. Results still look good, but it’s worth keeping in mind that you won’t get maximum quality doing this.  There’s also technically a 2-megapixel monochrome sensor, which is totally pointless in my opinion as a photographer. If you want good-looking black and white images, use the regular camera and apps like Adobe Lightroom or Snapseed to have full control over converting to mono. Frankly, I feel OnePlus could have pulled this out and lopped another 20 quid or so off the price.  OnePlus Nord 2 specs

Display size, resolution, refresh rate

6.43-inch AMOLED, FHD+ (2,400×1,080 pixels), 90Hz

Pixel density

410ppi

Dimensions (Inches)

6.25×2.88×0.32 in.

Dimensions (Millimeters)

158.9×73.2×8.25 mm

Weight (Grams)

6.66 oz; 189g

Software

Android 11

Camera

50MP (main), 8MP (wide-angle), 2MP (mono)

Front camera

32-megapixel

Video

4K

Processor

MediaTek Dimensity 1200-AI processor

Storage

128/256GB

RAM

8/12GB RAM

Fingerprint reader

No

Battery

4,500 mAh

Price

In-display

Connector

USB-C

Headphone Jack

No

Special features

5G-enabled, 65W fast charging, 90Hz, dual stereo speaker, face unlock

Price (USD)

Approximately $540 (converted from UK price)

Price (GBP)

£399

Price (AUD)

Approximately AU$740

Discover the latest news and best reviews in smartphones and carriers from CNET’s mobile experts.

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Huawei P50 series unveiled: Not one, but two camera bumps on these superphones – CNET

Huawei/Screenshot by Sareena Dayaram/CNET Huawei has taken the wraps off its latest superphone series. It unveiled the P50 and P50 Pro in an online event Thursday, each of which are getting a China-only release for now. The main superpower of Huawei’s phones has long been their cameras — and the P50 lineup is no exception. In fact,…

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Huawei P50 series unveiled: Not one, but two camera bumps on these superphones     – CNET

Huawei/Screenshot by Sareena Dayaram/CNET
Huawei has taken the wraps off its latest superphone series. It unveiled the P50 and P50 Pro in an online event Thursday, each of which are getting a China-only release for now. The main superpower of Huawei’s phones has long been their cameras — and the P50 lineup is no exception. In fact, you can see the emphasis Huawei put on the cameras as soon as you look at the phones: Both the P50 and P50 Pro have not one but two camera bumps, which together take up more than a third of the phone’s rear width. This wasn’t entirely a surprise, since Huawei had teased images and videos of the lineup ahead of the event, but it does make for an eye-catching new design, which does away with the dual hole-punch design of the P40 series.The P50 Pro has four cameras on its rear: a 50-megapixel main, a 64-megapixel telephoto, a 40-megapixel monochrome and a 13-megapixel ultrawide lens. The P50 has a similar camera bump, but it has one less lens. There’s a 50-megapixel main camera, a 12-megapixel telephoto and a 13-megapixel ultrawide. Surprisingly, the base version has better optical zoom than the Pro version (5x versus 3.5x optical zoom). Each has 13-megapixel selfie cameras.Huawei’s P50 lineup was launched in China on Thursday.
Huawei
Beyond the camera, the P50 series stacks a range of enviable features, as expected (see the specs list below for more details). A crisp and smooth OLED display, a large battery, fast charging (66 watts) and powerful processors. The P50 series comes in two variants — one powered by the company’s own Kirin 9000 chipset and the other by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 888 4G CPU. Qualcomm was granted permission to sell chips to Huawei last year. These chipsets are backed up by 8GB of RAM and 256 or 512GB of flash storage. You may recall Huawei phones no longer feature Google apps — a consequence of crippling US sanctions. But the P50 series is one of Huawei’s first new lineups to debut the company’s own operating system, Harmony OS, which the Chinese telecom had developed in-house to replace Google Mobile Services in its smartphones. When the P50 launches internationally, it should provide Huawei with the opportunity to gauge consumer response to the company’s in-house software and whether it’ll gain wider adoption among international shoppers amid the backdrop of Huawei’s eroding smartphone market share.  Huawei’s Richard Yu unveiled the company’s P50 series in a virtual launch event.
Huawei/Screenshot by Sareena Dayaram
Huawei is starting out with a China release before the series gets an international rollout (if it ever does), though specs may vary slightly based on your country. The P50 Pro starts at 5,988 yuan (roughly $930, £665 or AU$1,256), while the P50 starts at 4,488 yuan (roughly $695, £500 or AU$940).Key specsHuawei P50 Pro 4GDisplay: 6.6-inch OLED, 120Hz, 2,700×1,228 pixels, 450ppiDimensions: 158.8×72.8×8.5mmCamera: 50-megapixel main, 64-megapixel telephoto, 40-megapixel monochrome, 13-megapixel ultrawideProcessor: Snapdragon 888 4GBattery and charging: 4,360 mAH, 66-watt charging, 50-watt wirelessWater and dust resistance: IP68 ratingHuawei P50 4GDisplay: 6.5-inch OLED, 90Hz, 2,700×1,224 pixelsDimensions: 156.5×73.8×7.9mm Camera: 50-megapixel main, 13-megapixel ultrawide, 12-megapixel telephotoProcessor: Snapdragon 888 4GBattery and charging: 4,100 mAh, 66-watt chargingWater and dust resistance: IP68 rating

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2021 Mercedes-Benz S580 review: The benchmark once again – Roadshow

Bring back hood ornaments. Andrew Krok/Roadshow Imagine the pressure of making a new Mercedes-Benz S-Class. This car is supposed to be the peak of Everest for buyers who want a full-fat luxury car, and every successive generation should add more to the pile without forgetting its raison d’être, which means there’s a lot riding on…

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2021 Mercedes-Benz S580 review: The benchmark once again     – Roadshow

Bring back hood ornaments.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow

Imagine the pressure of making a new Mercedes-Benz S-Class. This car is supposed to be the peak of Everest for buyers who want a full-fat luxury car, and every successive generation should add more to the pile without forgetting its raison d’être, which means there’s a lot riding on every new model. All that hard work has paid off, though, because the 2021 Mercedes-Benz S-Class is an absolute banger, once again setting the standard for all other luxury cars.

LikeTop-tier rideMakes you feel like a million bucksSweet augmented-reality HUD

Don’t LikeConfounding sunroof controls

The 2021 Mercedes-Benz S580 is damn near the perfect luxury car, although styling is subjective, and I’ll be the first to admit that the latest iteration of Mercedes’s design language isn’t my favorite. My sole complaint is that the rear end is Eeyore-tier droopy, with a chrome unibrow spanning the width of the trunk, which is my absolute least favorite 21st-century flourish.The rest of the S580’s exterior is all about class. Despite wearing the more aggressive bumpers and side skirts of the $4,300 AMG Line package, my tester is still rather demure. The 21-inch AMG alloy wheels have a pretty trad-luxe look to them, too. This car doesn’t need crazy angles or cut lines to make a statement — it’s just a big, fancy sedan, carving its way through traffic with a properly old-school hood ornament leading the charge.

2021 Mercedes-Benz S580 wants to coddle at every opportunity
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If for some reason I don’t feel like a million bucks walking up to the Mercedes S580, I sure feel like it once the doors open — actually, no, before, thanks to electronic door handles that pop out from the body as I approach. The S-Class has long had  the plushest interiors in the auto industry, and that continues with the 2021 model. The black Nappa leather is soft, and not only are the front seats supportive as heck, on the S580 they come standard with an excellent multi-contour massage function. The rear seats are roomier than before, with plenty of headroom and legroom for me to splay out.The S580’s interior design borrows heavily from the Vision EQS concept, with a large swath of wood trim running the width of the dashboard, punctuated by pairs of vents on either side. The 12.8-inch OLED infotainment screen rises up from the center console, leaving enough space behind it for an additional storage tray. The cover beneath the screen moves to reveal two normal-sized cup holders, a wireless charging pad and an extra tray for masks, keys or other pocket detritus. Under the armrest, there’s enough space for a small purse, while the door pockets are just big enough to hold some large drink containers. There’s no massive binnacle surrounding the 12.3-inch gauge display, which means the dashboard stays nice and low, making for excellent forward visibility.

Plunk down an extra $3,000 and the space in front of the gauges turns into a giant projector for one seriously impressive head-up display. Not only will it deliver the usual information readouts like speed and direction of travel, it can also work with local vehicle-to-infrastructure tech to display the time remaining on a red light. My favorite part, though, is the augmented-reality integration that the S-Class shares with its electric EQS sibling, displaying upcoming turns as arrows that grow closer as the intersection does, as well as highlighting traffic when adaptive cruise control is active. The information is always where it needs to be, too, thanks to eye-tracking cameras built into the gauge display, which can function in a trick 3D Mode for a little extra visual flair. Flipping through the many available layouts and menus is made easy thanks to touchpad-style buttons on the steering wheel.

The big ol’ screen in the middle of the S580 runs an updated version of the MBUX infotainment system we’ve seen in every other Merc, and it works as well as ever in this iteration. It’ll run wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, but there are also four USB-C ports in the center console for front-seat occupants to use. The touchscreen collects smudges like no other, but it’s responsive, and it’s pretty darn impressive, too, especially when it’s running a fullscreen map. The bottom part of the display always shows climate controls, with a smattering of physical buttons beneath that for changing driving modes, turning up the volume, engaging the hazard lights or reading my fingerprint to pull up my personal settings (not mandatory).The display’s angle is perfect for visibility, although you can accomplish 90% of what you need to by voice command alone.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
The only controls that frustrate me are found overhead. This S580 has two sunroofs, one per row, and they are controlled with the most infuriating touch slider known to man. I spent an entire week trying to figure out the logic behind how it works, but no matter what directions my fingers go, it does everything — opens and closes the front panel, tilts the front panel, engages the front panel’s sun shade — except the one function I actually want it to. I despise it on the EQS, and I despise it here.What’s impossible to despise, though, is the 2021 Mercedes S580’s ride. It is, simply put, the best in the segment, with an adaptive air suspension that preternaturally eliminates nearly every inch of bad road underfoot, feeling pillowy smooth almost all the time. The S-Class floats down the road, and combined with thick glass, driver and passengers alike will be all but shut off from the world on the other side. The suspension lowers and stiffens when put into Sport or Sport Plus mode, and while the S580 does a pretty good impression of a full-size sport sedan, I’d recommend waiting for an AMG variant if you really want to give it the ol’ what-for. This thing may corner well, but what it really wants to do is luxuriate at all possible opportunities.It’s hard to be uncomfortable in these seats. The S580 is bound to be a road trip king for those thrones alone.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
The S580’s powertrain is nice and smooth. Under the hood is a 4.0-liter twin-turbocharged V8 producing 496 horsepower and 516 pound-feet of torque, augmented by a 48-volt mild hybrid system that can throw another 21 hp and 184 lb-ft into the mix, usually when leaving a stop or pushing the accelerator into the firewall. The V8 is plenty potent on its own, but with this bit of electrification, the S580 feels like it runs on a never-ending well of motive force. A nine-speed automatic transmission does its thing with near imperceptibility, and optional rear-axle steering (4.5 degrees, $1,300, although 10-degree steering is also available on some variants) means it’s pretty darn easy to navigate parking lots and other tight confines. The EPA rates the S580 at 17 mpg city and 25 mpg highway, and while the city estimate seems spot on, I’m able to squeeze out something closer to 30 mpg on the highway.If a V6 feels like overkill in the twilight years of the internal combustion engine, the S500 might scratch your itch, instead. This model ditches two cylinders, opting for a turbocharged straight-6 making 429 hp and 384 lb-ft. It, too, has the EQ Boost mild hybrid system, as well as standard all-wheel drive and the same nine-speed automatic. It’s a little more efficient, though, coming in at an EPA-estimated 20 mpg city and 29 mpg highway.This may be the final generation of the combustion-powered S-Class, and this 4.0-liter V8 sings one heck of a swan song if that’s the case.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
There are some very capable driver aids willing to lend a hand. Standard full-speed adaptive cruise control combines efforts with lane-keeping assist to keep the vehicle centered in its lane at the pace of traffic, eliminating the tedium of longer commutes but still requiring hands on the wheel and eyes pointed down the road. While active, though, the driver aids make soft inputs and keep the ride comfortable. For parking, the infotainment screen can show a 360-degree area around the car, which I can twist and spin on the screen to make sure I’m staying in all the lines. Parking sensors combine efforts with the ambient lighting to give me an additional layer of warning in case I get too close to a wall or another car.It shouldn’t come as a surprise that the 2021 Mercedes-Benz S-Class ain’t cheap. The S580 starts at $117,350, and a limited number of aesthetic and functional enhancements bump my tester’s price up to $131,500 — and there’s still an AMG variant or two that will live above this one, in addition to the big-boy Maybach. The S500 and its straight-6 engine are thankfully a little less expensive, coming in at $110,850. Thank goodness.Mercedes’ closest competitors, the BMW 7 Series and Audi A8, are both high-quality luxury cars in their own right, but it’s hard to recommend anything other than the S-Class. The standard bearer remains at the front of the pack, and should stay there for a while. 

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