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Apple Lobbies for Lower Taxes to Boost US Chip Production

Apple has been lobbying the US government on tax breaks to support domestic chip production, suggesting the iPhone maker is keen to move more of its supply chain to the US.In second- and third-quarter disclosure reports, the company said it lobbied officials from the Treasury Department, Congress and the White House on tax topics including…

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Apple has been lobbying the US government on tax breaks to support domestic chip production, suggesting the iPhone maker is keen to move more of its supply chain to the US.In second- and third-quarter disclosure reports, the company said it lobbied officials from the Treasury Department, Congress and the White House on tax topics including “issues related to tax credits for domestic semiconductor production.”Since releasing its first custom processor in 2010, chips have become a major performance differentiator for Apple. The company designs some of these components in house, but outsources production to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing. Many other parts for Apple devices are made in China. That has exposed the company to import tariffs and other risks from a trade war between the US and China. Taiwan, where TSMC operates, has also become an increasing focus of geopolitical tension between China and the US.Apple’s recent lobbying coincides with a push by the company and its partners to move some production away from China and even back to the US in a few cases. There’s also a broader effort by the US semiconductor industry to get government support for increased domestic production.Apple’s US lobbying efforts are now mostly led by company veteran Tim Powderly, who was promoted around the time Cynthia Hogan, Apple’s prior top US lobbyist, left to join former vice president Joe Biden’s campaign. An Apple spokesman declined to comment.Earlier this year, TSMC said it would build a $12 billion (roughly Rs. 88,268 crores) chip plant in Arizona, and the company has been lobbying officials there for tax breaks.In 2013, Apple started making a low-volume Mac Pro computer in the US Last year, it started using the same plant in Texas to conduct final assembly for a new version. That decision came after the company was granted breaks on tariffs.Apple also sources components from several chipmakers that build some of their products in the US, including Broadcom and Texas Instruments. Apple also has started using Qualcomm again for iPhone modems, and the San Diego, California-based chipmaker builds some products domestically via production partner Global Foundries.Intel, the current maker of the Mac’s main processors, builds some of its chips in the US. However, when Apple moves to its own Mac chips next month, that will mean shifting production of that component to Taiwan.-With assistance from Ian King and Ben Brody© 2020 Bloomberg L.P.Are iPhone 12 mini, HomePod mini the Perfect Apple Devices for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

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Remote work could be silver lining of pandemic for some veterans, including those with PTSD

The global coronavirus pandemic has created an unprecedented increase in remote work arrangements for Americans –– a Gallup survey conducted in early August revealed that more than 30 percent of American workers are mostly or completely remote, and record levels of cases and hospitalizations may keep people working from home for the foreseeable future. Global…

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The global coronavirus pandemic has created an unprecedented increase in remote work arrangements for Americans –– a Gallup survey conducted in early August revealed that more than 30 percent of American workers are mostly or completely remote, and record levels of cases and hospitalizations may keep people working from home for the foreseeable future. Global War on Terrorism-era veterans stand to benefit from this shift, according to experts and veterans interviewed by Military Times. As of October, recent veterans currently enjoy a lower unemployment rate — 6.2 percent — than the general population. But for the estimated 11 to 20 percent of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who experience PTSD symptoms in a given year, and for veterans navigating the complex Veterans Affairs scheduling and rating process even for other conditions, an in-person office environment can pose significant challenges. “Work from home may be helpful to somebody with PTSD because it eliminates environmental irritants…that can have nothing to do with getting your job done,” said Carrie Elk, a therapist specializing in PTSD treatment and founder of the Elk Institute for Psychological Performance & Health, in a phone interview with Military Times. “Sometimes folks with PTSD have a lower threshold for frustration or agitation” and that can make them less comfortable and productive in a traditional work environment. Non-profit groups supporting veterans employment initiatives both confirm the increase in remote positions coming available and their benefit for veterans needing a more flexible or PTSD-friendly work environment. “Since March, we’re seeing a lot more of the work from home, work remote types of jobs becoming available,” said Bryan Rollins, national director of the Wounded Warrior Project’s Warriors to Work program, in a video interview. Rollins oversees a team of 42 that works “one on one” with wounded or disabled vets and hosts larger events with the goal of helping them find employment. Rollins says that out of the approximately 1,400 hires their job board has facilitated since mid-March, approximately 20 percent – or around 280 – have been in permanent remote positions. Other employers have adapted to the pandemic by making new positions temporarily remote, he explained, and even federal agencies have cut back on the red tape that previously restricted telecommuting. As for why the positions are beneficial to the veterans he serves, Rollins cites the potential reduction in distractions from an in-person working environment as helpful for vets with PTSD, as well as geographic flexibility enabling remote-employed veterans to live near a support system or any specialized medical care they may need. Sign up for the Education & Transition Newsletter Transitioning out of the military? Get the best education, employment and entrepreneurship tips from Military Times. (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Air Force Times Daily News Roundup. Military Times reached two veterans hired for remote work since the start of the pandemic to discuss their experience thus far. “I wouldn’t be able to do this” Retired U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Brady Busby poses for a photo while on deployment to Afghanistan in 2009. (Courtesy photo) Brady Busby, a retired Army signals intelligence chief warrant officer, recently started working for SelectQuote, an insurance company. In a video interview, Busby said he deployed seven times during his Army career, including three where he was assigned or attached to special operations forces. After severe PTSD, a traumatic brain injury, and a back injury forced him to retire from the Army in 2012, Busby had difficulty managing his symptoms while transitioning to a civilian career. “I have flashbacks; I have uncontrolled emotions sometimes. If I’m in a crowded area, I can’t really focus on any one thing too long,” he said. Busby’s oldest daughter died by suicide in 2018, exacerbating what he described as “complex PTSD.” After graduating from the University of Colorado in 2015, he worked part-time as a fly-fishing guide, he said. His daughter’s death led him to move to Arizona just before the start of the pandemic, he explained. He struggled to find full-time work until SelectQuote hired him for a fully-remote position in May. If the job weren’t remote, he said, “I wouldn’t be able to do this.” He worries that the stress of a difficult Phoenix commute and being in an in-person workspace would affect his ability to connect with clients and be successful. He credits his new work with “letting [him] help people” and “giving [him] more of a drive.” “I’m actually doing a lot better mentally now that I’m a subject matter expert in a different field.” “It’s like stars aligned” Recently-retired Navy veteran Kenneth Bond landed a remote job as a senior consultant for Deloitte in May after watching traditional opportunities dry up at the onset of the pandemic. Remote work has allowed Bond, who was a Navy supply officer and budget analyst, to relocate post-retirement to be closer to his family “support system” in Texas. He also credits the work arrangement for giving him the flexibility to meet his personal and medical needs. “[In Texas,] my family and I can create a lifestyle balance that supports my engagement with Wounded Warrior Project, the VA medical system, and a few other things that are on my plate,” he explained. The systemic shift to remote work was “a game-changer” that made the job search much easier from Texas. Bond explained it would be a challenge to balance his medical needs and family needs with a traditional in-person consulting job. “I can do [my job] from the comfort of this room. I don’t have to travel…I don’t have to be away from my family. And, frankly, I don’t have to be in a…business office where tons of people are coming and going.” He said an in-person job “may have been a non-starter,” as a result. It took him more than three months to coordinate his VA care for his post-service disability and get settled following his move. Ironically, Bond’s team works with the VA, according to a report published by Deloitte. “Being able to [work] remotely for Deloitte, it’s like stars aligned,” Bond concluded. “The future of work is here now.” The limits of remote work Remote work may have one potentially serious drawback for veterans, though. Veterans who work from home may be at greater risk of social isolation, according to Elk, the PTSD expert. “Sometimes folks with PTSD tend to isolate, and working remotely could exacerbate the isolation, which can lead to not such a great place for somebody who’s reliving memories in their mind.” Loneliness can be a contributing risk factor for death by suicide even among veterans who don’t experience PTSD, according to a 2019 flyer published by the VA. Elk thus suggests veteran remote workers “remind [themselves] and make sure” to find social groups and camaraderie through events like virtual happy hours or other groups in their lives. That’s exactly what Brady Busby did when he organized a veterans group among SelectQuote employees. “Now we have a group for SelectQuote with hundreds of veterans,” Busby said. “We’re all getting together [virtually]…and everyone’s saying the time they served and posting pictures.” Busby also is involved with non-profit organizations that aim to get veterans involved with fly-fishing and similar outdoors activities. Bond, the Navy veteran, volunteers with the American Red Cross. But Elk cautioned that even well-managed remote work is not a cure for vets with PTSD, though it can help reduce symptoms. “It doesn’t change anything about their trauma,” she said. “That takes treatment to resolve.”

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Best Cyber Monday 2020 deals: Save now on Kindle Oasis and Paperweight, Tomorrow deals on Chromebook, Dyson, and even more deals on Monday – CNET

This story is part of Holiday Gift Guide 2020, CNET’s gift picks with expert advice, reviews and recommendations for the latest tech gifts for you and your family. Black Friday is here and that means we’re only a few days away from Cyber Monday. This year, more than ever, we expect Cyber Monday to be…

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This story is part of Holiday Gift Guide 2020, CNET’s gift picks with expert advice, reviews and recommendations for the latest tech gifts for you and your family.

Black Friday is here and that means we’re only a few days away from Cyber Monday. This year, more than ever, we expect Cyber Monday to be little more than an extension of the Black Friday sale events spanning the whole month of November, and we’re already seeing some of the deals that will be available from a few brands and retailers. Now, we strongly advise against waiting for Cyber Monday. If you have your eye on something and it’s on sale for Black Friday, buy it now. There’s little chance it will be cheaper after today. But if nothing you’ve seen already for Black Friday has compelled you to pull out your credit card, here are the best deals we’ve seen so far for the Black Friday after-party that is Cyber Monday. Many of these deals actually start Saturday, but a few won’t kick in until the big Monday. Some have already begun even though they were slated for tomorrow. Grab the deals now while they’re hot!

Black Friday 2020 sales and deals

Amazon

The Kindle Oasis usually sells for $250, but you can save $75 on Cyber Monday. This ad-supported model has 8GB RAM and a 7-inch 300 ppi Paperwhite display and is fully waterproof for casual bathtub reading.

Amazon

The Fire HD 8 has an 8-inch display (the 8 is for its size, not a version number), 32GB storage and a 12-hour battery life. Usually $90, you can snag one for $55 on Cyber Monday.

Molly Price/CNET

They’re usually $25, but you can snap up these handy Wemo Smart Plugs for just $15 on Cyber Monday. Use them to control anything you can plug in with Siri, Alexa or Google Assistant. About 45% smaller than the previous model, this plug won’t cover both outlets, leaving the second one free to use.

Tineco

Tineco’s A10 Spartan is a lightweight cordless stick vacuum that has a 25-minute run time and a handy trigger lock for continuous power. It easily converts from a full-size vacuum to a handheld for small cleanups. The wall charger conveniently also stores the accessories.

Amazon’s ever-popular Kindle Paperwhite comes in a handful of colors, is fully waterproof (because who knows where you’re going to want to do some reading) and, as the name suggests, has an easy-on-the-eyes Paperwhite display. The best part? The battery only needs a recharge about once every three or four weeks. It’s usually $130, but you can save $45 on Cyber Monday.

Deals starting Nov. 28

Sarah Tew/CNET

The Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 are hard to talk about without comparisons to the iconic Quiet Comfort 35 II. They sound better, have more features (including Alexa and Bose AR and USB-C charging) and let you hear the world around you with transparency mode. Read our Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 review.

Hisense’s expansive 65-inch TV features a 4K LED display with a 120Hz refresh rate, and DTS Virtual:X audio. The Android TV streaming video software can be controlled by voice via Google Assistant, plus it has Bluetooth and Chromecast support. 

Best Buy

You’d be hard-pressed to find a cheaper laptop. This two-in-one convertible touchscren from Lenovo is a Chromebook with a MediaTek MT8173C processor, 4GB RAM and 32GB of storage. The display is a 1,366×768-pixel HD IPS screen, and the laptop can be used as a standard clamshell, tented or flipped around into a tablet. It includes an HDMI port to output to a monitor or television and includes a card reader for photo (and other file) transfers.

Chefman

The Chefman ToastAir 6-Slice Convection Toaster Oven does double duty as an air fryer. It has a temperature range from 200 F to 450 F and includes seven presets for different baking tasks. The spacious 20-liter interior accommodates six slices of toast and most standard baking pans — you can even fit a 5.5-pound chicken without trouble.

Dyson

Dyson’s V7 Animal is good for people with pets thanks to its ability to clean up pet hair from any surface in your home. It weighs less than 6 pounds and does double duty as a full-height stick vacuum or a handheld vac for smaller messes, and runs for about 30 minutes on a charge.

Linksys

This Linksys AC1200 dual-band router is regularly priced at $90. It has speeds up to 867Mbps, four Ethernet ports for connecting to your wired devices and one USB 3.0 connection for adding external storage devices to your network.

Bowflex

This deeply discounted Bowflex treadmill features a 7.5-inch full-color LCD console that displays information like distance, resistance and even calories you’ve burned in real time while the hand grip monitors your heart rate, and it includes Bluetooth connectivity as well. It’s powered by a 3.75-continuous-horsepower motor that drives a 20×60-inch tread belt. You can incline up to 15 degrees.

Cyber Monday deals starting Nov. 30

HyperX

On Cyber Monday only you can save $40 on the HyperX Cloud Flight S Wireless Gaming Headset. It features 7.1 virtual surround sound and a 30-hour battery life with Qi wireless charging.

David Carnoy/CNET

CNET’s David Carnoy calls the Tribit StormBox Micro “one of the best-sounding pocket-size speakers I’ve heard.” Usually priced at $40, this speaker is fully waterproof and offers 8 hours of battery life. Read our Tribit StormBox Micro review.

Marseille

The Marseille mClassic is a plug-in dongle that promises to upgrade the graphics of your Nintendo Switch, original Xbox, PlayStation 3 or other legacy console by upscaling them to 1440p resolution.

Nixplay

Usually $260, you can save 15% on the Nixplay Seed Wave 13.3-inch Wi-Fi Digital Picture Frame from Cyber Monday through Dec. 6. It’s a wide-screen HD digital photo frame with a pair of built-in Bluetooth speakers. You can pair your phone, tablet or PC to stream music through the frame while displaying your favorite photos.

Linksys

The Linksys MR8300 is a tri-band router that promises to deliver speeds up to 2.2Gbps throughout your home. It has a four-port Ethernet switch built in and you can extend the wireless network by adding a Velop Mesh Wi-Fi node anywhere in your home.

Looking for Black Friday shopping tips? Listen to the Cheapskate Show podcast below, and sign up for Cheapskate deal alerts via text message. Only one text per day, opt out anytime.

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Black Friday 2020 phone deal: The OnePlus 7T hits an all-time-low $300 – CNET

The OnePlus 7T features, among other things, three rear cameras. Angela Lang/CNET This story is part of Holiday Gift Guide 2020, CNET’s gift picks with expert advice, reviews and recommendations for the latest tech gifts for you and your family. In the old days, OnePlus made bargain phones. With the arrival of the OnePlus 8…

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The OnePlus 7T features, among other things, three rear cameras.
Angela Lang/CNET
This story is part of Holiday Gift Guide 2020, CNET’s gift picks with expert advice, reviews and recommendations for the latest tech gifts for you and your family.
In the old days, OnePlus made bargain phones. With the arrival of the OnePlus 8 earlier this year, however, the company moved squarely into the premium category. No more bargains, then? Actually, here’s one: For a limited time, and while supplies last, B&H has the unlocked OnePlus 7T for $300. That’s the lowest price I’ve seen; previous deals had it $100 higher. You can choose between the glacier blue and frosted silver colors.Compatible with both AT&T and T-Mobile networks, this phone isn’t even a year old. It’s notable for its lightning-fast processor, three rear cameras, smooth 90Hz screen and in-screen fingerprint reader. It comes with Android 10 right out of the box. Alas, there’s no wireless charging, which is a deal-breaker for me.

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I learned all that and more from reading CNET’s OnePlus 7T review, which you’ll want to read as well. At the time, $600 seemed like a pretty good deal for a phone with such high-end specs. Now it’s $300 less.Even so, the OnePlus 7T faces stiff competition from the newer likes of the Apple iPhone SE ($399), Google Pixel 4A ($349) and Samsung Galaxy A51 ($399). But, wow, this brand has legions of devoted fans, so if you’ve been waiting for a good deal to come along, this is it.Your thoughts?Read more: The best Black Friday phone dealsRead more: The best phones for 2020

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First published earlier this year. Updated to reflect new availability.   Read more: All the latest OnePlus couponsCNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and check out our CNET Coupons page for the latest promo codes from Best Buy, Walmart, Amazon and more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page.

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