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Barry Jenkins gives first look at ‘The Underground Railroad’

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{videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);videoPinner.animateDown();}}},onContentReplayRequest: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);var $endSlate = jQuery(document.getElementById(containerId)).parent().find(‘.js-video__end-slate’).eq(0);if ($endSlate.length > 0) {$endSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–active’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’);}}}},onContentBegin: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.enable();}/* Dismissing the pinnedPlayer if another video players plays a video. */CNN.VideoPlayer.dismissMobilePinnedPlayer(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.mutePlayer(containerId);if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) 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Amid COVID, Zoom is helping build communities for those displaced from shelters – CNET

Elizabeth Softky moved from a homeless shelter to a motel by the Pacific Ocean in March. Tech has helped her stay connected to friends and medical professionals. James Martin/CNET This story is part of Tech for a Better World, stories about the diverse teams creating products, apps and services to improve our lives and society.…

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Elizabeth Softky moved from a homeless shelter to a motel by the Pacific Ocean in March. Tech has helped her stay connected to friends and medical professionals.
James Martin/CNET
This story is part of Tech for a Better World, stories about the diverse teams creating products, apps and services to improve our lives and society.

Like most of us, Elizabeth Softky needs her phone and computer. They are her lifeline to stay connected to friends, family and health care providers during the coronavirus pandemic. But for Softky, connection is extra essential. In March, she was evacuated from a homeless shelter to a motel, an experience shared with several thousand other people in California facing homelessness when the pandemic began.  Now in her own room in a small motel on the coast of Northern California, Softky is continuing to get back on her feet after losing her home and livelihood while she fought cancer last year. Her tech devices are a big help. In an extreme version of the lockdown faced by others in the state, about 14,000 formerly unhoused Californians have been living in motel and hotel rooms for months, mostly alone. They’re riding out the coronavirus pandemic in a program the state hopes will keep huge numbers of vulnerable people from getting COVID-19. It’s only a small fraction of the estimated 150,000 people experiencing homelessness in the state. Still, states around the country are looking to California as a model for how to protect people who may have been living in tents, cars or crowded homeless shelters while dealing with severe illnesses, addiction and advanced age, all of which put them at high risk of complications from the novel coronavirus.  For some hotel residents like Softky, tech has proven instrumental for making the new system work.  The motel room gave her a chance to reflect on what she’d been through. It also made her lonely. “It was like, wow,” she said, “I’ve never felt this hunger for human contact.”  Other hotel residents are in a similar situation. While people undoubtedly benefit from moving into their own rooms from shelters, tents or cars, loneliness is a major concern. Now, there’s not much to distract them from thoughts of hard times and traumatic experiences, said Emily Watters, a psychiatrist who treats patients through a county homeless services program in the San Francisco Bay Area. “It’s just such a gift to be able to see my patients have their own room, and have a chance to heal,” Watters said. However, it leaves them without “this whole community that keeps people going and keeps people surviving the trauma.” 

Keep track of the coronavirus pandemic.

Creating digital communities Softky uses her smartphone and laptop to go to Zoom church services and keep up with her Meetup group from the town she lived in years before she lost her home of 14 years. She uses them to talk to doctors about her treatment. And she uses them to talk to a volunteer named Joan Scott through a program called Miracle Friends. Started by entrepreneur Kevin Adler as an offshoot of his nonprofit Miracle Messages, Miracle Friends connects people who’ve been evacuated to hotels with volunteers who can talk with them on the phone. The idea is to provide a social connection to relieve what Adler calls “relational poverty,” or the loss of friends, family and community that many people experience when they become homeless. “Our broader theory of change is that relational poverty is poverty,” Adler said, adding, “loneliness is deadly.” Softky outside of the hotel where she’s been living during the pandemic.
James Martin/CNET
Before the pandemic, Miracle Messages tried to connect people who were homeless with family or friends. Now, it’s partnering with homeless services in San Francisco to connect hotel residents with friendly volunteers. So far it has made more than 100 matches. Scott, the volunteer, talks and texts frequently with Softky. The two quickly learned they had plenty to talk about. “They did a random match-up, but we have so much in common,” Scott said. Both are born volunteers. In her role as senior director of corporate responsibility at Dolby Laboratories in San Francisco, Scott creates volunteer programs for the company’s employees and finds organizations for the company to support financially. Though Softky is the one receiving help now, she won an award for her volunteerism in college, and she ran a literacy nonprofit for six years before getting her cancer diagnosis.  Navigating a health care crisis Dave Nelson, another hotel resident at the Northern California hotel, is using video services to keep up with physical therapy and fitness classes to help recover from an emergency leg amputation in October. Nelson struggled to do his rehab exercises at the homeless shelter where he’d been living because the open-plan facility was full of obstacles and other people. Now, from his hotel room, he’s not just doing physical therapy. He’s also connecting to tai chi and yoga classes on his computer. “It’s not as good as going to a yoga class,” Nelson said, but it’s still a good way to stay on track with his recovery. He also talks with Kris Foss, a Miracle Friends volunteer, about once a week.  Foss said she wanted to get involved because homelessness is such a big problem in the Bay Area. Talking with Nelson has been interesting and educational, she added. Nelson, an aeronautical engineer, was flying to Southern California for a contract job last year when a gangrene infection prompted doctors to amputate his leg after he stopped on a layover in San Francisco. After that, he wasn’t able to travel on for the contract job. His health insurance was due to kick in shortly, when the job started, but he didn’t have it when he needed it. “I never expected to talk to someone with a story like this,” Foss said. “His story is so emblematic of our health care crisis in this country.” ‘They’re people to be loved’ While health emergencies are common among the people staying in hotels, others are fighting addiction. Tech can help them stay connected to 12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous, said Antonia Fernandez, an addiction counselor in Northern California. It’s not perfect, because the group chemistry is different when people aren’t there in person. Some of her clients don’t like the video meetings or struggle with the tech needed to connect. But it works for others, and there are some nice benefits, too. “You can attend a meeting in Hawaii right from your living room,” Fernandez said, adding, “you get different faces all the time.” Adler, the creator of Miracle Friends, hopes more volunteers will connect with homeless people in their communities. There’s plenty of focus, rightfully so, on solving the systemic problems that lead to homelessness, he said. But he added that the personal impact of living without a home should remain in focus. “People who experience homelessness are not problems to be solved,” Adler said. “They’re people to be loved, just like you and me.”

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Android vs. iPhone: 6 stellar features Apple fans wish their phones had – CNET

Android phones have some features that might make iPhone owners jealous. Sarah Tew/CNET With the release of iOS 14, Apple added several features that Android owners can no longer claim as bragging rights. For example, the iPhone now has picture-in-picture capabilities so you can watch a video and keep using your phone. Not to be…

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Android phones have some features that might make iPhone owners jealous.
Sarah Tew/CNET
With the release of iOS 14, Apple added several features that Android owners can no longer claim as bragging rights. For example, the iPhone now has picture-in-picture capabilities so you can watch a video and keep using your phone. Not to be outdone any longer, Apple added home screen widgets and the ability to customize app icons. Oh, and there’s even an app drawer now, called App Library. It’s unclear of the iPhone 12’s MagSafe feature is a benefit over Android, but we’re starting to warm up to it. Despite Android 11 adding new features like Quick Controls or a built-in screen recording tool, the update didn’t really add anything iPhone owners don’t already have access to. Nonetheless, Android users still have plenty of bragging rights over iPhone users. From being able to use two apps at the same time to Google Assistant and more customization options are, for now at least, some of the features Android owners can claim as their own.

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Below are 6 things Android still does better than the iPhone. Facts. Don’t worry, though. I’ve also given Android the same treatment by highlighting what the iPhone does better. Also facts.

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Use the apps you want, not the apps Google wants you to use Yeah, yeah, yeah. Apple added the ability to set your default app for email or web browsing in iOS 14, but that’s it. Google has given Android users the ability to set their default apps for a number of different tasks. Want to use a different app for text messaging than what came preinstalled? Do it. In fact, you should use Google Messages as your default app for its sweet chat features that are getting closer to being an iMessage equivalent. Finding the setting for default apps can take a little digging, but at least it’s there. 
Screenshots by Jason Cipriani/CNET
It isn’t hard to see which apps have been labeled as default on your Android device: Open the Settings app and go to Apps & notifications > Default apps. To change the defaults, select the app category, such as Phone app or Browser app and choose from the options.  Google Assistant is always ready for you. 
Jason Cipriani/CNET
Google Assistant for the win iPhone users have Siri, but Android gives you Google Assistant. Google Assistant is a much more sophisticated tool than Apple’s Siri for a slew of reasons, but the most important one is that it makes use of Google’s impressive database.  Google Assistant can understand common requests for businesses and names, plus it gets requests right more often than wrong. It also returns high-quality responses, drawing from Google Search, a tool that Siri doesn’t have access to. Google Assistant also tightly integrates with the phone’s other functions, to tell you when it’s time to leave for your next meeting and warn you that traffic will be heavy on the way home. If you have any Google Home or Nest Home smart speakers or other compatible devices, you can also use Assistant on your phone to control smart devices around your house like lights, outlets or your thermostat — even from afar. Split Screen is easy to use on an Android phone and increases the versatility of a phone. 
Jason Cipriani/CNET
And it’s built right into your Android device. “OK, Google” and “Hey, Google” are the two wake phrases. If you need help knowing what to ask, you can ask Google Assistant for a list of commands: “OK, Google, What can you do?” iPhone owners can also install the Google app to use Assistant, but it’s not built in and it’s not the default personal assistant.  Use two apps at once through split-screen mode Even though iPadOS supports using multiple apps at the same time, iOS 14 and the iPhone do not. Android users, however, have had split-screen apps since 2016 with the release of Android 7.0 Nougat. Using two apps is helpful if you’re trying to look up a contact’s phone number to send to someone on Facebook Messenger, or if you need to reference information in a document when composing an email. It’s unclear why Apple hasn’t added this feature to the iPhone yet, but perhaps it has something to do with the size of windows on the iPhone’s display as compared with the larger iPad ($284 at Back Market).  The easiest way to use split-screen mode is to open the multitasking view and tap on the app’s icon at the top of its multitasking card — it’s the same icon you use to launch the app from your home screen. Select Split screen from the list of options, then select the second app you want to have open at the same time. (These steps might vary depending on which Android phone you use. For example, Samsung phones have their own version of the interface.) Move icons around to arrange them, or delete them and only use the app drawer. 
Sarah Tew/CNET
You can adjust the size of each app by dragging the small handle between the two apps to expand or decrease how much space each app takes up. Read more: Best portable chargers and power banks to buy for Android in 2020   Customize your home screen just how you like it Apple’s approach to the home screen is still locked to placing all installed apps in a rigid grid, although you can now add widgets to the homescreen and mix up the overall look. However, the home screen on Android devices don’t follow a grid layout, allowing you to place apps anywhere you’d like. Both platforms let you make folders containing groups of apps. The benefit of Android’s approach is that you can customize the home screen by arranging app icons in any pattern of your choosing. The way your Android phone’s home screen looks is because of its launcher. But you’re not stuck with what comes preinstalled. 
Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET
You can use launchers to fully customize your phone Launchers are the epitome of Android customization. These apps let you completely change how you interact with the home screen, the app drawer and even the app icons on your phone. Using a launcher on your Android phone allows you to customize almost every aspect of how your phone looks and behaves, making your phone even more personal than it already is.  Launchers like Nova Launcher, Microsoft’s Launcher, Apex Launcher and Action Launcher all add their own twists and features to your Android phone. For example, another popular Android launcher, Evie, emphasizes using a search bar to quickly find and open apps, or anything else on your Android phone for that matter. It’s minimalism at its finest.  I recommend taking some time to research the various launchers, trying a couple of them and really customizing the look and feel of your phone. Just be forewarned: The deeper you dive into the world of launchers, the more time and energy you’re going to spend on tweaking your setup. It’s hard to imagine a world where Apple ever lets something like this happen for the iPhone, although it appears it is loosening its grip on how much iPhone users can change the look of their homescreen. The Wallpapers app is a must for any Android user. 
Jason Cipriani/CNET
Never get bored thanks to automatically changing wallpapers If taking the time to find and customize a launcher feels like a lot of work, there’s another way to make your Android phone constantly feel fresh and it’s yet another thing your iPhone friends can’t do — use Google’s Wallpapers app.  The Wallpapers app refreshes the wallpaper on your home screen and lock screen daily, without you having to do a thing.  There are several different categories of wallpaper styles to choose from. Pick your favorite and let the app take care of the rest. Personally, I like to use the geometric shapes category. The wallpapers are unique and colorful. Granted, the iPhone now has wallpapers you can pick from that change based on whether or not dark mode is activated. But even then, it’s still the same wallpaper two times a day. If you’re ready to switch to Android, or are looking to get more from the Android phone you already own, check out our list of the best Android phones of 2020. If you’re new to the OS, make sure to change these Android settings right away. Then after that, we have some helpful tips for using Android 10. 

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YouTube TV review: Multichannel live TV streaming for the jet set – CNET

Sarah Tew/CNET You’ve probably heard the phrase “change is the only constant.” Its author, Greek philosopher Heraclitus, was talking about life itself, but it applies to live TV streaming services too. For the first half of 2020 YouTube TV was our Editors’ Choice in premium services, but then the company raised its price by 30%, from…

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Sarah Tew/CNET
You’ve probably heard the phrase “change is the only constant.” Its author, Greek philosopher Heraclitus, was talking about life itself, but it applies to live TV streaming services too. For the first half of 2020 YouTube TV was our Editors’ Choice in premium services, but then the company raised its price by 30%, from $50 to $65. As a result we started recommending Hulu Plus Live TV instead. Inevitable, however, Hulu has raised its price to $65 as well, matching YouTube TV. Now that they’re the same price, YouTube TV is once again our favorite higher-end TV service for cord cutters, offering the most channels and best features. 

LikeMore channels than any competitor, including PBSSuperb cloud DVRExcellent on-screen interface and handy search bar

Unlike Hulu, YouTube’s price hike brought some extra channels such as Comedy Central, MTV and Nickelodeon. Google’s service now offers 76 of the top 100 channels, handily beating Hulu and the rest of the premium-priced competition, namely AT&T TV Now and Fubo TV. Its channel selection includes numerous cable staples and all four local networks — ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC — in most markets nationwide. YouTube TV is also the only multichannel streaming service with local PBS stations. In short, you might not even miss cable. Beyond channels, YouTube TV is easy to use, slick and fast on a variety of TV and mobile devices. Its cloud DVR is the best in the business, with unlimited storage and pretty much all the capabilities of a hardware DVR such as TiVo. 

The big snag, of course, is the price. For people used to the myriad channels and easy DVR of cable or satellite, it could be worth the extra expense over an entry-level service. For cord cutters who want more savings, however, Sling TV Blue at $30 per month is still pretty great and is especially suited to people on tighter budgets. What do you get? YouTube TV is different from YouTube, the free video service with more than 2 billion users a month. YouTube TV offers an experience similar to cable TV, with live channels and on-demand content available on a variety of devices. It works with Apple TV, Roku, Android TV, Chromecast, Amazon Fire TV along with numerous smart TVs, phones, tablets and web browsers.  The service operates in much the same way as competitors — there’s a program guide, a DVR and dozens of channels. But what really separates YouTube TV from other premium ($50-plus a month) services such as AT&T TV Now, Hulu with Live TV and FuboTV? Let’s take a look.

Top live TV streaming services compared

AT&T TV Now

FuboTV

Hulu Plus Live TV

Sling TV

YouTube TV

Base price

$55/month for 45-plus channels

$60/month for 100-plus channels

$65/month for 60-plus channels

$30/month for 30-plus (Orange) or 45-plus (Blue) channels

$65/month for 85-plus channels

Free trial

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC channels

Yes, in many markets

Yes, in many markets

Yes, in many markets

Fox and NBC only in select cities

Yes, in many markets

Simultaneous streams per account

2 ($5 option for 3)

2 ($6 option for 3)

2 ($15 option for unlimited)

1 (Orange), 3 (Blue)

3

Family member/user profiles

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Cloud DVR

Yes (50 hours, 200 hours for $10 a month)

Yes (30 hours, 500 hours for $10 a month)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Fast-forward through or skip commercials with cloud DVR

No (Yes with $15 option)

Yes

No (Yes with $10 option)

Yes

Yes

YouTube TV’s channel selection is excellent, with more from our list of 100 top channels than any other competitor. That said, more channels doesn’t necessarily mean more of what you want: Some services such as FuboTV lean heavily on sports while others are more wide-ranging. It’s best to check the list at the end of this article, which compares individual channels across services, to make sure you’re getting the channels you want. Like Hulu, YouTube TV doesn’t offer any add-on channel packages, although it does have a handful of single-channel add-ons like Showtime, Epix, HBO and HBO Max to your subscription.  What’s it like to use? YouTube TV’s user interface is fairly simple. There are three top-level tabs broken into Library, Home and Live. Library is where your DVR content lives. Home is where both featured and live thumbnails appear. The Live tab is a familiar-looking program grid which shows currently playing and upcoming shows. You can search for content from the top of any page, which makes it relatively easy to jump straight to the content you want. You can also perform searches with a compatible voice remote or Google Assistant.  You can connect to YouTube to watch related clips.
Ty Pendlebury/CNET
The service’s tie-in to YouTube proper is welcome — with YouTube originals included — though it could be more tightly integrated, especially on TV devices. For example, a content page appears when you press the Go To button on a show, and a Related on YouTube item appears at the bottom. It would be helpful to have thumbnails of related interviews and trailers appear more prominently on this page without having to delve into menus. The DVR works well and includes the ability to rewind and fast-forward freely through recordings, even ones that aren’t yet completed. The Roku interface offers a 15-second skip by default while the Apple TV’s control system is even better. You can use the touch pad to scroll through videos — and it’s glorious! It’s so much fun and thumbnails make it relatively easy to home in on the part you want. The DVR enables you to fast-forward and rewind, while Apple TV enables you to scrub through the timeline.
Sarah Tew/CNET
In the past, when a show appeared in a network’s on-demand library, it would automatically replace the version in your cloud DVR. That means you’d lose the ability to fast-forward through commercials. YouTube TV says it got rid of that restriction in October 2018, but some CNET readers have complained that it still occurs at times. Additionally, YouTube TV’s DVR is not truly unlimited. The shows expire after nine months, but this is still a lot longer than the 30 days you get with most rivals. YouTube TV won’t save you as much money At $50 YouTube TV was very attractive, but as the service has added more channels it also added further costs. When you add that $65 monthly fee to the $50 you’re already paying for internet, it means you’re paying over $110 a month. Many cable TV providers will give you a TV-and-internet bundle for around the same money. Prices vary a lot, of course, and with cable you probably have to pay rental equipment fees, taxes and other extras. And cable providers usually reserve the best bundle pricing for people who sign a contract. The same goes for new “streaming” offerings such as AT&T TV and Comcast’s Infinity Flex. Like Hulu with Live TV, Sling TV and others, YouTube TV is contract-free, so you can cancel at any time. Streaming services also have other advantages over cable. They’re easier to watch on phones and tablets, for example. At $65 per month, however, you’ll have to be coming from a relatively expensive cable bill to realize substantial savings with YouTube TV.  The service comes with a comprehensive program guide.
Sarah Tew/CNET
Should you get YouTube TV? If price is no object, YouTube TV is my favorite live streaming service, but at $65 the value proposition could be tough for some people. If you don’t want to be beholden to a traditional cable company it’s a great alternative, though you don’t save that much money. But as has happened in the case of Hulu Plus Live TV being cheaper if someone offers a better deal you can just switch without hassles. If you’re a hardcore cord cutter though, Sling TV Blue offers a compelling package especially when paired with an antenna or an AirTV 2.  Below you’ll find a comparison of the top 100 channels offered by a few of YouTube TV’s competitors. For more information and comparisons with additional services, check out the full article.Top 100 channels compared

Channel

YouTube TV ($65)

Hulu with Live TV ($65)

Fubo TV ($60)

AT&T TV Now ($55)

Sling Blue ($30)

Sling Orange ($30)

Total channels:

76

60

65

45

38

26

ABC

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

CBS

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Fox

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

NBC

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

PBS

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

CW

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

MyNetworkTV

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

Channel

YouTube TV ($65)

Hulu with Live TV ($65)

Fubo TV ($60)

AT&T TV Now ($55)

Sling Blue ($30)

Sling Orange ($30)

A&E

No

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

ACC Network

Yes

Yes

$

$

No

$

AMC

Yes

No

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

Animal Planet

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

No

BBC America

Yes

No

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

BBC World News

Yes

No

$

$

$

$

BET

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Big Ten Network

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

$

No

Bloomberg TV

No

Yes

No

$

Yes

Yes

Boomerang

No

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

Bravo

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Channel

YouTube TV ($65)

Hulu with Live TV ($65)

Fubo TV ($60)

AT&T TV Now ($55)

Sling Blue ($30)

Sling Orange ($30)

Cartoon Network

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

CBS Sports Network

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

No

Cheddar

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cinemax

$

$

No

$

No

No

CMT

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

$

CNBC

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

CNN

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Comedy Central

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cooking Channel

No

$

$

$

$

$

Destination America

No

$

$

$

$

$

Discovery Channel

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

No

Disney Channel

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Disney Junior

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

$

Disney XD

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

$

DIY

No

$

$

$

$

$

E!

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

EPIX

$

No

No

$

$

$

ESPN

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

ESPN 2

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

ESPNEWS

Yes

Yes

$

$

No

$

ESPNU

Yes

Yes

$

$

No

$

Channel

YouTube TV ($65)

Hulu with Live TV ($65)

Fubo TV ($60)

AT&T TV Now ($55)

Sling Blue ($30)

Sling Orange ($30)

Food Network

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

Fox Business

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

Fox News

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Fox Sports 1

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Fox Sports 2

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

$

No

Freeform

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

FX

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

FX Movies

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

$

No

FXX

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

FYI

No

$

Yes

$

$

$

Golf Channel

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

$

No

Hallmark

No

No

Yes

Yes

$

$

HBO

$

$

No

$

No

No

HGTV

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

History

No

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

HLN

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

$

IFC

Yes

No

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

Investigation Discovery

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

Lifetime

No

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

Lifetime Movie Network

No

$

Yes

$

$

$

Channel

YouTube TV ($65)

Hulu with Live TV ($65)

Fubo TV ($60)

AT&T TV Now ($55)

Sling Blue ($30)

Sling Orange ($30)

MLB Network

Yes

No

$

$

$

$

Motor Trend

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

Yes

MSNBC

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

MTV

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

$

$

MTV2

No

No

$

$

$

$

National Geographic

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Nat Geo Wild

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

$

No

NBA TV

Yes

No

$

$

$

$

NBC Sports Network

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Newsy

Yes

No

$

No

Yes

Yes

NFL Network

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

NFL Red Zone

$

No

$

No

$

No

NHL Network

No

No

$

$

$

$

Nickelodeon

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Nick Jr.

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Nicktoons

No

No

$

$

$

$

OWN

Yes

No

Yes

$

No

No

Oxygen

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

Paramount Network

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

$

Channel

YouTube TV ($65)

Hulu with Live TV ($65)

Fubo TV ($60)

AT&T TV Now ($55)

Sling Blue ($30)

Sling Orange ($30)

Science

No

$

$

$

$

$

SEC Network

Yes

Yes

$

$

No

$

Showtime

$

$

$

$

$

$

Smithsonian

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

No

No

Starz

$

$

No

$

$

$

Sundance TV

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

$

Syfy

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Tastemade

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

$

TBS

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

TCM

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

Telemundo

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Tennis Channel

Yes

No

$

$

$

$

TLC

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

No

TNT

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Travel Channel

Yes

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

TruTV

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

$

TV Land

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

$

USA Network

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

VH1

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

$

$

Viceland

No

Yes

Yes

$

Yes

Yes

Weather Channel

No

No

Yes

$

No

No

WE tv

Yes

No

Yes

$

$

$

Channel

YouTube TV ($65)

Hulu with Live TV ($65)

Fubo TV ($60)

AT&T TV Now ($55)

Sling Blue ($30)

Sling Orange ($30)

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