Connect with us
[adrotate group="1"]

Technology

Lenovo Flex 5 Chromebook review: More Chromebook for now and later – CNET

Josh Goldman/CNET Lenovo released one of the best Chromebooks of 2020 with its IdeaPad Duet two-in-one, a 10-inch Chrome OS tablet with a detachable keyboard and touchpad. However, while its small size and performance are awesome for mobility, they’re limiting if you need to spend hours using it for work. For that, Lenovo’s 13.3-inch IdeaPad…

Published

on

Lenovo Flex 5 Chromebook review: More Chromebook for now and later     – CNET

Josh Goldman/CNET
Lenovo released one of the best Chromebooks of 2020 with its IdeaPad Duet two-in-one, a 10-inch Chrome OS tablet with a detachable keyboard and touchpad. However, while its small size and performance are awesome for mobility, they’re limiting if you need to spend hours using it for work. For that, Lenovo’s 13.3-inch IdeaPad Flex 5 Chromebook is the better bet. It’s also a two-in-one, but it’s more a laptop than a tablet. With the Flex 5, you’re getting a larger display, a full-size backlit keyboard and better everyday performance with its 10th-gen Core i3 processor. 

LikeExcellent performance and battery life for its priceUSB-C ports for charging on both sidesUSI pen-enabled display

Don’t LikeMemory can’t be upgradedDisplay too dim for outside work

Like many Chromebooks right now, though, the IdeaPad Flex 5 Chromebook (also sold as the Lenovo Chromebook Flex 5) is in short supply. It was originally priced at $410 but is currently bouncing between $480 and $490. Still, even at that higher price, the Flex 5 is a good deal for what you’re getting. In the UK, the configuration is better and more expensive at £530. Lenovo doesn’t currently offer the IdeaPad Flex 5 Chromebook in Australia, but my system’s price converts to AU$578.Lenovo IdeaPad Flex 5 Chromebook

Price as reviewed

$410

Display size/resolution

13.3-inch 1,920×1,080-pixel touch display

Processor

2.1GHz Intel Core i3-10110U

Memory

4GB DDR4-2666 (soldered)

Graphics

Integrated Intel UHD Graphics

Storage

64GB eMMC

Ports

2x USB-C (3.1 Gen 1), 1x USB-A, audio/mic jack, MicroSD card slot

Networking

802.11ax (Wi-Fi 6) , Bluetooth 5.0

Operating system

Chrome OS

Weight

3 pounds (1.3 kg)

It’s a bit big to use as a handheld tablet, but on a desk, it’s just fine. 
Josh Goldman/CNET
Better than your average budget ChromebookMost Chromebooks that are less expensive than the Flex 5 typically have smaller displays, all-plastic bodies and slower processors. Spending a bit more for this Lenovo is worth it because it’s simply better. The body is only slightly larger than 11.6-inch models like those commonly used by school districts. However, the larger 13.3-inch display here makes a big difference when scrolling through learning sites or just whenever you need more of your work on the screen all at once. 

While the display’s color and contrast are fine, the screen is a bit dim. I found myself regularly trying to increase it beyond its max setting. This was mostly when I was using it in a bright room near a window or outside. Otherwise, the display was good enough, and it is USI (Universal Stylus Initiative) pen-enabled and will work with Lenovo’s USI Pen. The two-in-one design is nice to have for watching videos, casual gaming and presentations. 
Josh Goldman/CNET
Above the display is a serviceable 720p webcam. The mic quality is fine, too, so you should have no trouble being seen and heard on your next Google Meet. Virtually no Chromebooks, Windows laptops or MacBooks have decent full-HD-or-better webcams, which is a shame now that everyone’s using them non-stop. Along with a USB-C port on the right side is a volume rocker and power button, all of which can be accessed in tablet mode. but watch out, because the power button is easy to press accidentally when you steady the laptop to plug something into a port on the left side. It’s not a big deal since Chrome asks what you want to do — power off, sign out or lock — before it does anything; it’s just annoying. Lenovo did put USB-C ports on both sides, though, and you can charge the Chromebook from either. 

The keyboard is easy to read with or without the backlight on. 
Josh Goldman/CNET
Zipping through work to get to playThe rest of the Flex 5 is just roundly good. The keyboard is comfortable with a pleasing snappiness to it. Plus, it’s backlit, which is something you won’t find on cheaper models. The touchpad is nothing special but gets the job done with minimal lag and is just big enough. Overall performance is better than I expected, given the system’s 4GB of memory. I didn’t experience any sluggishness while working in Google Docs and Sheets, streaming video or music and doing basic photo editing. Then again, I also keep my number of open Chrome tabs under 20. The biggest issue is you can’t add more memory later since the 4GB here is soldered on. Battery life is pretty good, too, coming in at 11 hours and 22 minutes on our streaming video test. For more typical work use, I’d expect around 7 to 8 hours of use but it’s all going to depend on what you’re doing.The Flex 5 Chromebook
Josh Goldman/CNET
I played a couple of Android games from the Google Play store and didn’t experience any slowdowns doing that, either. And if you want to take advantage of Google’s streaming game service, Stadia, or Nvidia’s GeForce Now service, you’ll appreciate the Flex 5’s fast Wi-Fi 6 support (though you’ll likely need a new router to take advantage of it). If you need a Chromebook as a primary device, the Lenovo Chromebook Flex 5 ($479 at Amazon) is an excellent option, especially if or when the price drops back down to its regular $410. Cheaper Chromebooks can certainly help you get your work done right now. The Flex 5’s features and performance should keep you going longer, though, and for only a bit more money. 

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code

Phones

Acer’s new smart speaker is a colorful contribution to the market – CNET

Acer’s new smart speaker will be available in early 2021. Acer If you’re interested in smart speakers, but not impressed by what you’ve seen from Amazon, Google or Apple, there are third-party speakers out there. Acer on Wednesday announced the Acer Halo, a $109 smart speaker with DTS sound, LED display and more.The Acer Halo sits…

Published

on

By

Acer’s new smart speaker is a colorful contribution to the market     – CNET

Acer’s new smart speaker will be available in early 2021.
Acer
If you’re interested in smart speakers, but not impressed by what you’ve seen from Amazon, Google or Apple, there are third-party speakers out there. Acer on Wednesday announced the Acer Halo, a $109 smart speaker with DTS sound, LED display and more.The Acer Halo sits on a base lit up by RGB lighting you can customize. The glowing lights can sync with streaming music, too. That music streams from a speaker with DTS sound designed to project in 360 degrees to fill the room.

For more like this
Subscribe to the TVs, Streaming and Audio newsletter, receive notifications and see related stories on CNET.

On the front of the speaker’s gray fabric cover, an LED light display provides visual information like weather or time. Acer is working on an app that will let you personalize the message or image displayed via LED.An LED display on the front of the speaker displays information.
Acer
The smarts behind this speaker come from Google Assistant. You’ll use the usual “Hey, Google” voice command to request music, podcasts, news and answers to questions. The Acer Halo is equipped with two far-field omnidirectional microphones to detect ambient noise and voice commands. A physical switch is available to mute the microphones.Acer isn’t the first third-party manufacturer to try its hand at a smart speaker. We’ve seen successful models from Bose and Sonos, among others. The Acer Halo Smart Speaker will be available in North America in early 2021 starting at $109. Its European price of 119 euros converts to about £110 or AU$200. 

Now playing:
Watch this:

This luxury speaker brings Alexa smarts to art gallery…

6:55

Continue Reading

Technology

Best upcoming Xbox Series X games you’ll need to play – CNET

If you’re one of the lucky ones who managed to snag an Xbox Series S/X preorder, you probably know the launch lineup by heart. But while the games that launch alongside a console are key, if you’re weighing whether or when to buy a console, titles in the pipeline are often more important.So, other than…

Published

on

By

Best upcoming Xbox Series X games you’ll need to play     – CNET

If you’re one of the lucky ones who managed to snag an Xbox Series S/X preorder, you probably know the launch lineup by heart. But while the games that launch alongside a console are key, if you’re weighing whether or when to buy a console, titles in the pipeline are often more important.So, other than Microsoft’s excellent Game Pass service, what reasons do you have to buy either an Xbox Series S or X? Here are five. Assassin’s Creed Valhalla
Ubisoft

For more like this
Subscribe to the CNET Now newsletter for our editors’ picks of the most important stories of the day.

With Halo Infinite being delayed until 2021, Assassin’s Creed Valhalla is now the Xbox Series X’s biggest launch title. True, you’ll be able to play it on Xbox One, PS4 and PS5, but that won’t stop it from being a big hit among new Series X owners. Valhalla takes Assassin’s Creed into England, but the English aren’t the stars of the game: the Vikings are. Valhalla is all about the Norse invasion into England in the ninth century. So, yeah, Assassin’s Creed Valhalla is likely to be pretty gnarly. Tetris Effect: ConnectedBuying a new console for a puzzle game sounds strange (unless your memories of PSP launch game Lumines are as fond as mine), but Tetris Effect was far more exciting than your typical puzzler. It was named Game of the Year by several publications, an usual feat for a game in its category. Tetris Effect: Connected adds online co-op and competitive multiplayer, and launches alongside the Xbox Series S/X on Nov. 10.Halo Infinite
Microsoft
Halo Infinite was meant to be the killer app of not just the Xbox Series X but also Game Pass. Master Chief’s next adventure was to release on Microsoft’s Netflix-esque service on Nov. 10, Series X launch day, but in August it was delayed until 2021. So that’s the bad news. The good news is the delay will ultimately mean a more polished, spectacular Halo Infinite. It’ll be available, via Game Pass, on Xbox Series X, PC and Xbox One. FableOne for the distant future, the storied Fable franchise is getting an Xbox Series X reboot. The game was announced back in July, but we didn’t see any gameplay in its debut trailer. That means, despite reports that development began in 2018, the next Fable will hit the platform in late-2021 or 2022. But, considering the popularity of the first three Fable games, it’s looking to be a big hit when it does drop. Forza Motorsport
Microsoft
The PlayStation 5 has Gran Turismo, and the Xbox Series X will have Forza Motorsport. It was announced at the same event as Fable and, like Fable, we don’t know when it’s going to launch. But we do know, based on almost every other Forza game, that it’ll probably be excellent. Plus, a Forza game came out every year between 2012 and 2018, but we’ve not gotten one since 2018’s Horizon 4. That means we’re due for one soon.

Continue Reading

Technology

Huawei ban timeline: Sweden bans Chinese company from its 5G networks – CNET

Huawei makes some striking phones, but they aren’t available in the US. César Salza / CNET en Español Huawei is a huge telecommunications supplier and phone manufacturer, but it’s a pariah in countries like the US. There’s been no shortage of scrutiny of the Chinese telecom giant in recent years, and countries have been banning the use…

Published

on

By

Huawei ban timeline: Sweden bans Chinese company from its 5G networks     – CNET

Huawei makes some striking phones, but they aren’t available in the US.
César Salza / CNET en Español
Huawei is a huge telecommunications supplier and phone manufacturer, but it’s a pariah in countries like the US. There’s been no shortage of scrutiny of the Chinese telecom giant in recent years, and countries have been banning the use of its equipment in their 5G networks. Its phones are also virtually invisible in the US, despite its massive presence around the world.The company’s chairman had predicted that 2020 would be “difficult” for Huawei, and there certainly have been challenges. The US continues to pressure allies to block Huawei from their next-generation 5G wireless networks. In July, the UK opted to ban Huawei from its 5G infrastructure: The company’s gear must be removed by 2027 — a decision that Huawei found “disappointing” as 5G becomes increasingly mainstream. Read more: Huawei and China-US tensions: Where do we go from here?

Discover the latest news and best reviews in smartphones and carriers from CNET’s mobile experts.

The core issue with Huawei has been concerns about its coziness with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies. It’s the reason why the US banned companies from using Huawei networking equipment in 2012 and why the company was added to the US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security Entity List in May 2019, following an executive order from President Donald Trump effectively banning Huawei from US communications networks. A year later, Trump extended the order until 2021.Read more: Not just Huawei: A guide to China’s biggest and best smartphone makersThe US initially offered a reprieve to companies, allowing them to work with Huawei through a temporary general license, but the Commerce Department accused the company of exploiting the rules to continue using American technology in its semiconductor design. It tightened those rules in August 2020 and said the temporary general license wouldn’t be extended further.Huawei has long denied any wrongdoing and continues to maintain its innocence.Read more: Huawei P40 Pro Plus’ 10x optical zoom camera puts iPhone and Samsung to shameIt can be tough to keep pace with the sheer number of headlines, so here’s a timeline going back to 2018.2020Oct. 20, 2020: Sweden bans Huawei from its 5G networks.Oct. 8, 2020: UK Parliament cites “clear evidence” Huawei colluded with Chinese state.Oct. 1, 2020: UK found a flaw of “national significance” in Huawei tech, a government report says.Sept. 30, 2020: China reportedly prepares antitrust probe into Google following Huawei prompt.Sept. 29, 2020: BT picks Nokia to power 5G networks as UK starts to phase out Huawei.Sept. 23, 2020: Huawei chairman labels ongoing US bans as “non-stop aggression.”Sept. 10, 2020: Huawei says it’s bringing Harmony OS to phones and expanding it to other hardware-makers. It also reveals new headphones, watches and laptops.Sept. 4, 2020: FCC estimates it’ll cost $1.8B to remove Huawei, ZTE equipment from US networks.Aug. 24, 2020: India will quietly remove Huawei equipment from its networks as border tensions rise, a report says.Aug. 19, 2020: Huawei says its older Android phones will continue to get software and security updates even though its Google license has expired.Aug. 17, 2020: US tightens restrictions on Huawei’s access to American chips.Aug. 13, 2020: India takes steps to lock Huawei and ZTE out of its 5G rollout.July 30, 2020: Huawei takes Samsung’s crown to become world’s biggest phone maker, analyst says.July 29, 2020: Qualcomm settles long-running Huawei patent spat.July 20, 2020: China reportedly considers action against Nokia and Ericsson if EU bans Huawei.July 15, 2020:  Trump administration hits Huawei workers with US visa restrictions.July 14, 2020: UK follows US in banning Huawei from its 5G network.July 3, 2020: Huawei brings Uber rival Bolt to its AppGallery store.June 30, 2020: Huawei and ZTE officially designated national security threats by FCC.June 25, 2020: Trump administration designates Huawei as backed by Chinese military.June 17, 2020: Huawei reveals which phones will get EMUI 10.1 update.June 15, 2020: Commerce Department lets US companies work with Huawei on developing 5G standards.June 10, 2020: NATO boss supports the UK’s review of Huawei’s role in its 5G rollout.June 9, 2020: Huawei insists it “grew up in the UK” and wants to play a significant role in the country’s 5G deployment.June 4, 2000: Documents reportedly reveal Huawei covered up ownership of Iranian affiliate in scheme to sell prohibited US tech.June 3, 2000: Canadian telecoms effectively lock Huawei out of country’s 5G development.June 2, 2020: US Senator Tom Cotton tells British politicians he thinks China is trying to use Huawei to “drive a hi-tech wedge between” America and the UK.June 1, 2020: Huawei reportedly turns to rival chipmakers to weather US clampdown.May 27, 2020: Huawei CFO loses case to dismiss extradition to the US.May 26, 2020: UK launches fresh probe into Huawei’s role in future 5G plans. Huawei announces partnership with Youtube rival Dailymotion.May 22, 2020: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson reportedly looks to reduce Huawei’s role in country’s 5G networks.May 18, 2020: Huawei criticizes new US rules as “pernicious” and “arbitrary,” and China reportedly prepares to take “forceful countermeasures” against US tech companies.May 15, 2020: Commerce Department tightens export controls on Huawei, and extends Temporary General License for another 90 days.May 14, 2020: Trump extends executive order targeting Huawei for another year.May 7, 2020: US rule might let American companies work with Huawei on 5G.May 1, 2020: Huawei Australia’s carrier business drops 21% for 2019 as 5G ban bites.April 29, 2020: Huawei reportedly expands partnership with European chipmaker in the face of increasing US restrictions on suppliers.April 21, 2020: Huawei reports 1.4% revenue increase for the first quarter of 2020 as it grapples with the coronavirus pandemic. Also, senior British official reportedly says UK is unlikely to reconsider “firm” decision to allow Huawei access to non-sensitive parts of its 5G network.April 20, 2020: Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei downplays his influence over the company in a South China Morning Post profile.April 17, 2020: Chinese teaser video showcases Huawei’s Nova 7 phone series ahead April 23 reveal.April 15, 2020: BT delays removal of Huawei equipment from EE’s core network by two years.April 13, 2020: Huawei warns that disrupting its involvement in Britain’s 5G rollout would do the country “a disservice.”April 2, 2020: Huawei signs non-aggression patent pact as it joins Open Invention Network.March 31, 2020: Huawei reports smallest profit increase in three years as US ban takes its toll.March 27, 2020: Huawei reportedly starts working on cloud gaming platform with Tencent, the biggest games company in the world.March 26, 2020: Huawei reveals P40 Pro Plus, P40 Pro and P40, along with smart assistant Celia. Also, senior US officials reportedly agree on new rules to cut Huawei off from global chip suppliers.

Now playing:
Watch this:

Huawei unveils P40, P40 Pro and Pro Plus

10:57

March 24, 2020: Huawei P40 and P40 Pro apparently leak online ahead of launch.March 12, 2020: Trump signs law to prevent US rural telecom carriers from using Huawei network equipment, and France is reportedly planning to allow some Huawei gear in its 5G network.March 11, 2020: US officials reportedly postpone a meeting on potential new restrictions on sales of technology to Huawei and China, and the Commerce Department extends Huawei license through May 15.March 9, 2020: Huawei cancels P40 launch event due to coronavirus, and US envoy reportedly presses Canada over Huawei role in 5G network.March 6, 2020: Huawei reportedly projects major drop in phone sales amid US sanctions.March 4, 2020: Nokia and Ericsson pitch themselves to US lawmakers as Huawei 5G alternative. Also, Huawei pleads not guilty to new US criminal charges in 2018 case and FCC’s Brendan Carr says US “cannot treat Huawei as anything other than a threat to our collective security.”March 3, 2020: US senators urge UK to reconsider use of Huawei gear in its 5G network.March 2, 2020: Leaked documents reportedly reveal Huawei’s role in shipping prohibited US gear to Iran.Related story: Huawei P40 Pro specs, P40 Pro Plus and P40 vs. P30 Pro and Mate 30 Pro: What’s new and what’s different?Feb. 28, 2020: Huawei will spend €200 million on new 5G plant in France.Feb. 27, 2020: FCC starts collecting data on Huawei use in US networks, and Senate passes bill banning government purchases of Huawei gear.Feb. 26, 2020: Officials from Huawei and Defense Department spar at cybersecurity panel.Feb. 24, 2020: Huawei will launch its P40 Pro in Paris on March 26, its upgraded Mate XS foldable will be available outside China and the company is bringing a new tablet, speaker and green MateBook X Pro laptop to Europe. And Trump reportedly accuses British Prime Minister Boris Johnson of “betrayal” in a heated phone call about Huawei 5G decision.Feb. 23, 2020: Google warns people against sideloading its apps on Huawei’s P40 phones.Feb. 21, 2020: The White House reportedly is planning a 5G summit to combat Huawei.Feb. 20, 2020: Huawei makes an aggressive 5G infrastructure product pitch to European nations.Feb. 18, 2020: A judge dismisses a Huawei suit challenging the US government’s equipment ban.Feb. 14, 2020: Huawei gets another 45-day reprieve from Commerce Department.Feb. 13, 2020: The Justice Department charges Huawei with racketeering and theft of trade secrets.Feb. 11, 2020: The US reportedly finds Huawei has backdoor access to mobile networks globally.Feb. 7, 2020: Attorney General William Barr suggests that US take a “controlling stake” in Ericsson or Nokia to counter Huawei.Feb, 6, 2020: Huawei hits Verizon with lawsuits alleging patent infringement, and it’ll reportedly join forces with Vivo and Oppo against Google Play Store.Feb. 5, 2020: Vodafone says implementing UK and European Huawei restrictions could take five years.Feb. 3, 2020: Huawei asks FCC to drop national “unlawful and misguided” security risk label, and updates its “ultralight” MateBook D laptops.Jan. 30, 2020: Australian politicians dismiss talk of revisiting Huawei 5G ban.Jan. 29, 2020: EU allows Huawei for 5G, but warns states to limit core network access.Jan. 28, 2020: UK gives Huawei the green light to build the country’s non-core 5G network, with some limitations, while an analyst says Huawei is the world’s top 5G phone vendor.Jan. 24, 2020: The Pentagon reportedly blocked even tighter rules on US companies selling to Huawei.Jan. 23, 2020: Huawei postpones its China developers conference due to deadly coronavirus outbreak.Jan. 20, 2020: Huawei will use TomTom’s navigation software and data after losing Google Maps.Jan. 16, 2020: Huawei Mate XS foldable phone will reportedly be cheaper and smaller, while images of purported Huawei P40 Pro hint at many camera features.Jan. 15, 2020: Huawei shipped nearly 7 million 5G phones last year, and it’s reportedly spending $26 million courting developers to build apps for its phones.Jan. 14, 2020: The US presses British officials to block Huawei from its 5G network, and US senators propose over $1B in 5G subsidies to counter Huawei dominance.Jan. 9, 2020: Sen. Tom Cotton unveils a bill to stop the US from sharing intelligence with countries that use Huawei 5G technology.Jan. 7, 2020: Huawei is allowed to participate in India’s 5G trial phase.Read more: China wants to dominate the most important tech of our time2019Dec. 31, 2019: Huawei boosted phone sales in 2019 but predicts a “difficult” 2020.Dec. 26, 2019: Huawei rebuts suggestions that Chinese state support drove its growth.Dec. 20, 2019: Huawei’s new P40 Pro rumored to have 10x optical zoom.Dec. 19, 2019: Greenland opts for Sweden’s Ericsson over Huawei for 5G rollout.Dec. 18, 2019: Huawei opens 5G innovation center in London.Dec. 17, 2019:  Huawei will launch the P40 Pro in March without Google support, and Spain’s Telefonica says it’ll drastically reduce Huawei gear use for its core 5G network.Dec. 16, 2019: US House of Representatives passes bill barring government from buying Huawei gear. Dec. 15, 2019: Norway’s Telenor says Huawei will still play a role in the country’s 5G rollout.Dec. 13, 2019: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou wins court order to receive documents for her arrest and extradition.Dec. 8, 2019: Huawei will bring Harmony OS to more products next year, but not phones.Dec. 5, 2019: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson takes selfie with Huawei phone after hinting at ban.Dec. 4, 2019: Huawei slams FCC’s new restrictions as unconstitutional in legal challenge.Dec. 3, 2019: Huawei cut US components out of Mate 30 in wake of Trump’s ban, and US judge disqualifies Huawei lawyer from fraud and sanctions case, citing conflict of interest.Dec. 2, 2019: Huawei predicts Australia’s 5G ban will force it to cut 1,500 jobs.

Now playing:
Watch this:

What is going on between Huawei and the US?

4:59

Nov. 29, 2019: Huawei will apparently fight the FCC decision to exclude it from federal subsidies.Nov. 26, 2019: Huawei and Samsung see jump in phone sales for third quarter, while others see decline.Nov. 25, 2019: Huawei unveils its iPad Pro rival, the MatePad Pro, for China.Nov. 22, 2019: The FCC bars Huawei and ZTE from billions in federal subsidies, while senators want Trump to halt licenses that let US companies sell to Huawei.Nov. 21, 2019: Microsoft scores license to export software to Huawei.

Now playing:
Watch this:

Huawei P40 Pro and Plus first impressions: CNET editors…

5:24

Nov. 20, 2019: Huawei Mate X’s folding screen costs $1,000 to fix.Nov. 19, 2019: Huawei says US license extension doesn’t change the fact that it’s being treated unfairly.Nov. 12, 2019: Huawei is reportedly giving staff $286 million in bonuses for sticking through US ban.Nov. 8, 2019: Trump’s tech chief slams countries for “opening their arms” to Huawei.Nov. 7, 2019: Huawei founder says the company’s coping fine with the US trade ban, but stresses the need for open collaboration.Nov. 5, 2019: Hungary will reportedly work with Huawei in building its 5G network.Nov. 4, 2019: US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says licenses allowing US companies to sell equipment to Huawei “will be forthcoming very shortly.” Nov. 1, 2019: Huawei might be working on an iPad Pro-style tablet.Related story: Huawei Watch GT 2e gets a sporty look, new health features.Oct. 31, 2019: The UK general election has apparently delayed the decision on giving Huawei access to the UK’s 5G network again. Also, Huawei ships 66.7 million phones in 2019’s third quarter.Oct. 28, 2019: The Federal Communications Commission says it’ll cut off funding to wireless carriers using Huawei and ZTE equipment. 

Oct. 23, 2019: Huawei launches the Mate X foldable phone in China and celebrates hitting 200 million phone shipments two months sooner than it did last year. Also, the company’s cybersecurity chief says it’d be easier to bribe telecom staff than build backdoors into networks.Oct. 21, 2019: A Huawei executive acknowledges the company’s struggling without Google support.Oct. 16, 2019: Huawei sold a whole bunch of phones despite the US ban, while a Mate X unboxing video hints at the foldable phone’s imminent release. Also, Germany caused an uproar with draft network security rules that would let Huawei work on its 5G networks.Oct. 15, 2019: Huawei and Sunrise co-build a 5G research center in Switzerland.Oct. 9, 2019: Trump is reportedly ready to approve sales of US goods to Huawei.Oct. 4, 2019: Malaysian telecom Maxis signs up with Huawei for 5G.Oct. 2, 2019: Huawei Mate 30 phones apparently lose backdoor access to Google apps.Related story: Can Huawei Mate 30 Pro’s camera beat iPhone 11’s? These photos speak for themselves.   Sept. 30, 2019: Huawei opens flagship store in Shenzhen.Sept. 26, 2019: Huawei apparently is making 5G base stations without US parts, and Norway says it won’t ban the company from its 5G rollout.Sept. 19, 2019: Huawei unveils the Mate 30 Pro phone, Watch GT 2 and Vision TV during an event in Munich. Sept. 18, 2019: Huawei urges Australia to embrace Chinese products during its “explosion of innovation,” and its Mate 30 event lineup apparently leaks a day early.Sept. 12, 2019: Huawei’s founder is ready to sell his company’s 5G tech to a Western buyer. Separately, Huawei is selling MateBook laptops with Linux preinstalled in China.Sept. 10, 2019: Huawei drops a lawsuit against the US government after its telecom equipment is returned.Sept. 9, 2019: Microsoft President Brad Smith wants the US government to offer more evidence to back up its Huawei ban. Also, US prosecutors charge a Chinese professor with fraud for allegedly taking a California company’s tech for Huawei’s benefit.Sept. 8, 2019: Huawei’s Mate X foldable phone could go on sale in October.Sept. 6, 2019: Huawei skirts US ban with “new” P30 Pro, but only the colors are new. It also shows off the 5G Kirin 990 chip that’ll power its Mate 30.Sept. 3, 2019: Huawei accuses US of using cyberattacks and threats to disrupt its business. It also intends to give universities $300 million annually despite the US trade ban.Sept. 2, 2019: Huawei announces that the Mate 30 series launches Sept. 19.

Now playing:
Watch this:

Huawei shows off Bluetooth smart glasses

0:52

Aug 27, 2019: US reportedly receives more than 130 requests for Huawei licenses, but none have been issued yet. Also, new Huawei phones reportedly won’t be able to use Android.Aug. 23, 2019: Huawei reckons the US ban will cost its phone division $10 billion, and sheds 100 Australian jobs after being banned from country’s 5G rollout.Aug. 22, 2019: Huawei says it has no plans to launch a Harmony-powered phone. Related story: HarmonyOS: What’s with Huawei’s Android-replacement operating system?  Aug. 19, 2019: US Commerce Department extends reprieve allowing companies to work with Huawei.Aug. 18, 2019: Trump says he doesn’t want to do business with Huawei due to the “national security threat” it represents.Aug. 16, 2019: Huawei’s founder expresses confidence that UK “won’t say no to us” in its 5G rollout.Aug. 15, 2019: Huawei pushes back the launch of its Mate X again, and might be working on its own version of Google Maps.Aug. 14, 2019: Huawei is apparently researching 6G wireless internet connectivity.Aug. 13, 2019: India remains undecided on letting Huawei sell its 5G networking equipment in the country.Aug. 9, 2019: Huawei unveils its Android replacement “Harmony,” while Trump says the US won’t do business with Huawei.Aug. 7, 2019: Trump administration says it’ll ban government from doing business with Huawei, and Republican senators target Google over Huawei project.Aug. 6, 2019: Huawei Twitter poll reveals its followers think it’s owned by the Chinese government, but people on Facebook disagree.Aug. 4, 2019: Huawei will reportedly release a cheap phone powered by its Hongmeng OS in late 2019.July 31, 2019: Huawei beat iPhone with 17% global market share in 2019’s second quarter, research firm said.July 30, 2019: Huawei reported revenue surge despite US ban, and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Trump administration could decide on licenses allowing Huawei sales by next week.July 29, 2019: Huawei and Google were reportedly working on a smart speaker before ban.July 26, 2019: Chinese authorities suspect FedEx illegally held back over 100 Huawei packages, report said.July 25, 2019: Electronics company reportedly “seized” $100M of Huawei goods following US ban.July 24, 2019: United Arab Emirates telecom says US ban on Huawei isn’t an issue for its 5G network. July 23, 2019: Huawei lays off more than 600 US workers due to blacklisting.July 22, 2019: Leaked documents suggested that Huawei secretly helped build North Korea’s wireless network. Also, the White House gathering tech execs for a meeting where Trump reportedly said Huawei licensing deals will be “timely.”July 19, 2019: Huawei says Hongmeng OS isn’t designed as an Android replacement.July 16, 2019: Bipartisan group of senators introduces 5G legislation that would keep Huawei blacklisted.July 15, 2019: Canada may wait until after October elections to decide on Huawei ban, while the US will reportedly let Huawei sell to companies within weeks. Also, Huawei reportedly plans major layoffs at its US research labs.July 9, 2019: US will allow licensed sales to Huawei, but it remains blacklisted.July 7, 2019: Huawei CEO says its HongMeng OS alternative is ‘likely’ faster than Android, but needs its own app store.July 4, 2019: US government tries to get Huawei lawsuit thrown out.July 3, 2019: Huawei remains on Commerce Department’s blacklist despite Trump’s latest decision.July 2, 2019: Huawei reportedly isn’t sure about using Android in future phones.July 1, 2019: Trump official says eased Huawei restrictions only apply to widely available products.June 29, 2019: Trump decides to lift some restrictions on US companies selling to Huawei.June 27, 2019: Huawei employees worked on Chinese military research projects, according to a report from Bloomberg.June 25, 2019: US companies are reportedly bypassing the Trump ban on sales to Huawei, while FedEx is suing the Commerce Department over the diversion of Huawei packages.June 24, 2019: Huawei says it’ll increase its 5G investment in spite of US ban, while attorneys for its imprisoned CFO have asked for the US extradition request to be withdrawn. Also, an FCC commissioner wants Huawei gear out of US networks, and the Trump administration reportedly is thinking about requiring domestic 5G equipment to be made outside China.June 21, 2019: Huawei unveils a trio of new Nova 5 phones in China as US tensions simmer, and its Mate X foldable phone will reportedly launch by September. The US also blacklists five more Chinese tech companies.June 19, 2019: Huawei’s CEO isn’t worried about $30 billion revenue hit from US ban.June 18, 2019: Huawei boss predicts $30B revenue hit from US ban, but Microsoft starts selling its laptops again.June 13, 2019: Chinese ambassador warns Britain that excluding Huawei from 5G sends a “bad signal.”June 12, 2019: Huawei reportedly moves to trademark its own OS, and apparently chases Verizon for $1B in patent licensing fees.June 11, 2019: Huawei says it’ll need more time to become world’s biggest phone seller and reportedly delays announcement of its new laptop indefinitely. June 10, 2019: Huawei reportedly asks app developers to publish on its AppGallery store, and a White House official apparently wants to delay the US government’s Huawei ban.June 7, 2019: Facebook stops letting Huawei preinstall its apps, and Google reportedly warns the Trump administration that its Huawei ban creates a national security risk. Also, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou’s extradition hearing is set for January 2020.June 6, 2019: Russian telecom agrees to let Huawei develop country’s 5G network, while China gives Huawei a boost by issuing 5G licenses.June 5, 2019: Huawei chairman says company would sign a “no-spy” deal with US.June 4, 2019: Huawei trade secrets trial reportedly kicks off in Texas.June 3, 2019: Science publisher IEEE reverses its week-old ban on Huawei scientists reviewing technical papers.June 2, 2019: Huawei reportedly strips back production of phones amid US crackdown.

May 31, 2019: Huawei reportedly orders employees to cancel US meetings, mirrors Consumer Technology Association’s criticism of Trump’s plans to impose higher tariffs on imported Mexican goods.May 30, 2019: Huawei membership restored by SD Association and Wi-Fi Alliance, while it quietly launches its 5G lab in the shadow of the US ban. Also, its wearables shipments quadruple in first quarter.May 29, 2019: Huawei asks court to rule US ban unconstitutional.May 28, 2019: Huawei reportedly plans to bring OS to China later this year, internationally in 2020.May 26, 2019: Huawei’s founder says he’d “be the first to protest” if China retaliated against Apple.May 24, 2019: Huawei’s operating system may be called “Hongmeng,” while Amazon Japan reportedly stops selling its devices.May 23, 2019: US reportedly accuses Huawei of lying about Chinese ties.May 22, 2019: Chip designer Arm ditches Huawei, while Mate 20 X gets dropped from UK 5G launch.May 21, 2019: Huawei reportedly wants its app store to compete with Google’s.May 20, 2019: Huawei gets a temporary reprieve from the US trade ban, prompting Google to revive work temporarily.May 19, 2019: Google cuts off Huawei phones from future Android updates.May 16, 2019: Huawei says US ban will ‘significantly harm’ American jobs and companies.May 15, 2019: Trump effectively bans Huawei with a national security order.May 8, 2019: 5G rollout may face a delay in UK over Huawei investigations.May 3, 2019: Countries draft 5G security proposals as the US warns again of Huawei’s threat.May 2, 2019: A Huawei leak prompts the sacking of UK defense minister Gavin Williamson.May 1, 2019: Huawei hits 50% growth in phone sales and reportedly has an 8K 5G TV in the works for later this year.April 30, 2019: Vodafone found hidden backdoors in Huawei equipment, according to a report.April 24, 2019: Britain will reportedly allow Huawei limited access to 5G infrastructure. Several days later, China pushes Britain to let Huawei be part of 5G rollout.April 21, 2019: The CIA reportedly says Huawei is funded by Chinese state security.April 11, 2019: Google and Huawei will pay Nexus 6P owners for bootloop issues in class-action lawsuit.April 9, 2019: The US reportedly no longer demands a Huawei ban in Germany.April 8, 2019: Huawei is “open” to selling its 5G chips to Apple, says report.April 4, 2019: Huawei sets new goals to overtake Samsung and Apple, and MIT severs links with Huawei and ZTE due to US investigations.
Mate X foldable phone: Here’s what it’s really like to use
See all photos

March 29, 2019: Huawei slams US for having “a loser’s attitude” because its tech can’t compete.March 28, 2019: British watchdog warns that Huawei products represent “significantly increased risk.”March 26, 2019: Huawei launches the P30 and P30 Pro in Paris.March 19, 2019: Angela Merkel pushes back against US pressure to bar Huawei from Germany’s 5G rollout.March 15, 2019: Huawei’s CFO wanted to quit before arrest, according to the company’s founder.March 14, 2019: Huawei is developing its own OS in case it can’t use Android or Windows, report says.March 12, 2019: US reportedly tells Germany to drop Huawei or it’ll limit intelligence sharing. The Huawei Mate 20 hits 10 million shipped.March 8, 2019: Huawei sues the US government over its equipment ban.March 5, 2019: Huawei reportedly calls for international cybersecurity standards.March 1, 2019: An extradition hearing for Huawei’s CFO gets the go-ahead from Canada, and the US warns the Philippines against using Huawei 5G gear.

Now playing:
Watch this:

Huawei shows off new laptop, speaker and tablet for Europe

1:57

Feb. 28, 2019: Chinese kids literally sing Huawei’s praises in surreal video.Feb. 26, 2019: Samsung and Huawei settle 2-year-old patent dispute.Feb. 25, 2019: Huawei could face a solar tech ban in the US.Feb. 24, 2019: Huawei unveils the Mate X foldable phone.Feb. 22, 2019: Italian politicians reportedly push for Huawei 5G ban.Feb. 21, 2019: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says countries using Huawei tech pose a risk to the US.Feb. 20-21, 2019: Ren Zhengfei says that the arrest of his daughter, the company’s CFO, was “politically motivated and that the US treats 5G like “military” tech.Feb. 19, 2019: Ren tells the BBC “there’s no way the US can crush us.”Feb. 17, 2019: The UK reportedly concludes that using Huawei in 5G is a manageable risk.Feb. 6, 2019: US State Department discourages European countries from using Huawei equipment in their 5G rollouts.Feb. 4, 2019: A report says the FBI raided a Huawei lab and set up a CES sting. Also, two of the company’s staff were expelled from Denmark after a work permit inspection.
The charges unsealed today clearly allege that Huawei intentionally conspired to steal the intellectual property of an American company.
FBI Director Christopher Wray, Jan. 29, 2019
Jan. 30, 2019: Qualcomm reaches an interim licensing agreement with Huawei.Jan. 29, 2019: US hammers Huawei with 23 indictments for alleged trade secret theft and fraud.Jan. 25, 2019: Colleges reportedly drop Huawei equipment to appease the Trump administration. Also, Huawei says it’ll reveal a foldable phone with 5G in February.Jan. 24, 2019: Huawei reportedly says it’ll take the smartphone crown from Samsung by 2020.Jan. 23, 2019: Huawei’s CFO may face formal extradition to the US, report says.Jan. 18, 2019: China says a Canadian ban on Huawei’s 5G tech will trigger “repercussions.”Jan. 11, 2019: In Poland, a Huawei employee gets arrested over alleged spying.Three days later, Huawei sacks that employee.Jan. 8, 2019: Huawei fights to stay in the US with laptops and tablets at CES.Jan. 4, 2019: Senators introduce a bipartisan bill to address concerns about Chinese tech companies.Jan. 3, 2019: A report suggests that President Trump may use an executive order to ban Huawei and ZTE purchases.Read: Huawei could survive without Android, but not very well2018Dec. 24, 2018: Huawei exceeds 200 million smartphone shipments.Dec. 12, 2018: A Canadian court grants Huawei’s CFO $10 million bail.Dec. 7, 2018: Reuters reports that Japan will stop buying Huawei, ZTE equipment.Dec. 6, 2018: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou is arrested in Canada at the request of the US.Dec. 5, 2018:  Britain’s BT says it’ll strip Huawei equipment from 4G network by 2021 and won’t use it in 5G core.Oct. 18, 2018: Huawei tussles with US startup CNEX Labs over theft of technology.

Sept. 7, 2018: Huawei gets caught cheating on a phone benchmark test.Sept. 5, 2018: In a Senate hearing on Facebook and Twitter, Huawei and ZTE get called out.Aug. 1, 2018: Knocking off Apple, Huawei becomes the No. 2 phone seller.July 19, 2018: Huawei crosses 100 million shipments mark for the year to date.July 11, 2018: Australia says it’ll ban Huawei from 5G rollout amid security concerns.June 7, 2018: Congress calls out Google over its ties with Huawei.June 6, 2018: A report reveals that Facebook gave Huawei special access to user data.May 2, 2018: The Pentagon bans the sale of Huawei and ZTE phones on US military bases.March 22, 2018: Huawei loses Best Buy as retail partner.Feb. 13, 2018: FBI Director Chris Wray warns against buying Huawei and ZTE phones.Jan. 9, 2018: At CES, Huawei CEO Richard Yu addresses the loss of AT&T support.

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!