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Violence erupts in Bengaluru over social media post

Two people were dead and three injured after police opened fire, according to a regional news channel. Violent protests broke out in eastern Bengaluru late on Tuesday night over a “derogatory message’ posted by a politician’s relative on social media. Two people were dead and three injured after police opened fire, according to a regional…

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Two people were dead and three injured after police opened fire, according to a regional news channel.

Violent protests broke out in eastern Bengaluru late on Tuesday night over a “derogatory message’ posted by a politician’s relative on social media.
Two people were dead and three injured after police opened fire, according to a regional news channel.
A mob gathered outside Congress legislator Akanda Srinivas Murthy’s house where they shouted slogans against the post and also resorted to arson.
The mob was demanding the arrest of Naveen, who is related to Murthy and rioted in DJ Halli, KG Halli and Pulakeshi Nagar.

Chaos in KG Halli Police Station limits #Bengaluru. Members of a community allegedly pelt stones, burn vehicles and attack police over a derogatory post by a close relative of Pulakeshinagar MLA Akhanda Srinivasa Murthy. pic.twitter.com/u3M6Thx17g
– Nolan Pinto (@nolanentreeo) August 11, 2020
Murthy, the legislator from Pulikeshi Nagar, posted a video on social media asking the mob to stop the agitation.
“Please don’t resort to violence over the mischievous work of some miscreants,” appealed Murthy.
A large mob was also seen opposite KG Halli police station in the city.
Another mob barged into the DJ Halli police station and torched some vehicles and vandalised furniture, proceeding to attack a few policemen.
Hundreds of rioters raised slogans at the top of their voice and continuously banged the gate of DJ Halli police station.

Chaos in KG Halli Police Station limits #Bengaluru. Members of a community allegedly pelt stones, burn vehicles and attack police over a derogatory post by a close relative of Pulakeshinagar MLA Akhanda Srinivasa Murthy. pic.twitter.com/u3M6Thx17g
– Nolan Pinto (@nolanentreeo) August 11, 2020
Photographs showing the vandalism outside the DJ Halli police station went viral.
The mob chanted religious slogans even as some members from the same community tried to calm down the mob.
‘Mat karo’, said one of the persons who tried to calm down the mob as many mask-wearing protesters came out into the streets.
Meanwhile, to control and disperse the mob, policemen in riot gear were deployed and baton-charged protesters who resorted to arson and also overturned the police vehicle.
Chamarajpet MLA B. Z. Zameer Ahmed Khan also requested the rioters to stay calm and maintain peace in the area.
“The incident that is happening in Kaval Bysandra is unfortunate. I am hopeful that police will take action against all those who are responsible for this,” said Khan.
City Police Commissioner Kamal Pant visited the riot-hit areas where a heavy police presence has been deployed, an official said on Wednesday.
“Unfortunate incidents have occurred in localities like DJ Halli and KG Halli. Police carried out a baton charge to bring the situation under control,” said a police official adding strict action will be taken against guilty.
State home minister Basavaraj Bommai has also warned of strict action against those who take law into their hands.

Karnataka: Visuals from Bengaluru’s DJ Halli Police Station area where violence broke out over an alleged inciting social media post.Two people died & around 60 police personnel sustained injuries in the violence in Bengaluru, according to Police Commissioner Kamal Pant. pic.twitter.com/QsAALZycs0
– ANI (@ANI) August 11, 2020
More than an hour ago, Jamiat Ulama-I-Hind leader Mufti PM Muzzamil also sent out a video message from outside the DJ Halli police station, flashing a paper in his hand.
He said an FIR was lodged against the person who made the derogatory post and assured the protesters that he will be arrested.
Muzzamil appealed the rioters to keep their emotions in control.
Meanwhile, police mistook a couple of journalists as rioters and hit them with a pole.
“Your police hit my head with a pole even though we kept yelling we are reporters,” complained a television journalist to the police commissioner.
Another journalist who went to cover the riot was hit in the back.
“We had to run from your police to save ourselves when there was a no mob present,” said the injured journalist whose head was seen bleeding.
The journalist said that he and others came to see what is actually happening at the ground zero but were attacked by the police without any provocation even though there was no mob around.

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Military suicides up as much as 20% in COVID era

WASHINGTON — Military suicides have increased by as much as 20 percent this year compared to the same period in 2019, and some incidents of violent behavior have spiked as service members struggle under COVID-19, war-zone deployments, national disasters and civil unrest. While the data is incomplete and causes of suicide are complex, Army and…

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WASHINGTON — Military suicides have increased by as much as 20 percent this year compared to the same period in 2019, and some incidents of violent behavior have spiked as service members struggle under COVID-19, war-zone deployments, national disasters and civil unrest. While the data is incomplete and causes of suicide are complex, Army and Air Force officials say they believe the pandemic is adding stress to an already strained force. And senior Army leaders — who say they’ve seen about a 30 precent jump in active duty suicides so far this year — told The Associated Press that they are looking at shortening combat deployments. Such a move would be part of a broader effort to make the wellbeing of soldiers and their families the Army’s top priority, overtaking combat readiness and weapons modernization. The Pentagon refused to provide 2020 data or discuss the issue, but Army officials said discussions in Defense Department briefings indicate there has been roughly a 20 percent jump in overall military suicides this year. The numbers vary by service. The active Army’s 30 percent spike — from 88 last year to 114 this year — pushes the total up because it’s the largest service. The Army Guard is up about 10 percent, going from 78 last year to 86 this year. The Navy total is believed to be lower this year. Army leaders say they can’t directly pin the increase on the virus, but the timing coincides. “I can’t say scientifically, but what I can say is — I can read a chart and a graph, and the numbers have gone up in behavioral health related issues,” Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said in an AP interview. Pointing to increases in Army suicides, murders and other violent behavior, he added, “We cannot say definitively it is because of COVID. But there is a direct correlation from when COVID started, the numbers actually went up.” Sign up for the Early Bird Brief Get the military’s most comprehensive news and information every morning (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Early Bird Brief. In this March 19, 2020, file photo Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy, left, accompanied by Gen. James McConville, Army chief of staff, right, speaks at a news conference at U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Md. (Andrew Harnik/AP) Preliminary data for the first three months of 2020 show an overall dip in military suicides across the active duty and reserves, compared to the same time last year. Those early numbers, fueled by declines in Navy and Air Force deaths, gave hope to military leaders who have long struggled to cut suicide rates. But in the spring, the numbers ticked up. “COVID adds stress,” said Gen. Charles Brown, the Air Force chief, in public remarks. “From a suicide perspective, we are on a path to be as bad as last year. And that’s not just an Air Force problem, this is a national problem because COVID adds some additional stressors – a fear of the unknown for certain folks.” The active duty Air Force and reserves had 98 suicides as of Sept. 15, unchanged from the same period last year. But last year was the worst in three decades for active duty Air Force suicides. Officials had hoped the decline early in the year would continue. Navy and Marine officials refused to discuss the subject. Civilian suicide rates have risen in recent years, but 2020 data isn’t available, so it’s difficult to compare with the military. A Pentagon report on 2018 suicides said the military rate was roughly equivalent to that of the U.S. general population, after adjusting for the fact that the military is more heavily male and younger than the civilian population. The 2018 rate for active duty military was 24.8 per 100,000, while the overall civilian rate for that year was 14.2, but the rate for younger civilian men ranged from 22.7 to 27.7 per 100,000, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. James Helis, director of the Army’s resilience programs, said virus-related isolation, financial disruptions, remote schooling and loss of child care all happening almost overnight has strained troops and families. “We know that the measures we took to mitigate and prevent the spread of COVID could amplify some of the factors that could lead to suicide,” said Helis, who attended department briefings on suicide data. Army leaders also said troops have been under pressure for nearly two decades of war. Those deployments, compounded by the virus, hurricane and wildfire response and civil unrest missions, have taken a toll. Soldiers’ 10-month deployments have been stretched to 11 months because of the two-week coronavirus quarantines at the beginning and end. McCarthy said the Army is considering shortening deployments. Gen. James McConville, Army chief of staff, said there’s new attention to giving service members “the time that they need to come back together and recover.” “We were very focused on readiness four years ago because we had some readiness challenges, and we did a great job. The force is very, very ready now. But I think it’s time now to focus on people,” he told the AP. McConville and Army Sgt. Maj. Michael Grinston said units have begun “stand-up” days, where commanders focus on bringing people together, making sure they connect with each other and their families and ensuring they have strong values in how they treat each other. The isolation is also taking a toll on veterans, particularly the wounded. Sergio Alfaro, who served in the Army for 4 ½ years, said fears associated with the virus intensified his PTSD and suicidal thoughts. “It’s definitely something that’s made things a bit more chaotic, trying to plan for the future, do things together,” said Alfaro, who deployed near Baghdad in 2003, facing daily mortar rounds, including one that killed his commander. “It’s almost like adding more trash on the heap.” While he once feared that strangers passing by might hurt him, now he fears people may have COVID and not show symptoms. Others in support groups, he said, “are just sick of living this way, worried about what’s coming over the next hill, what next horrible thing are we going to be confronted with.” Roger Brooks, a senior mental health specialist at the Wounded Warrior Project, said veterans are reporting increased suicidal symptoms and anxiety. Between April and the end of August, the group saw a 48 percent jump in referrals to mental health providers and a 10 percent increase in mental health calls and virtual support sessions, compared to the previous five months. Brooks said there’s anecdotal evidence that the pandemic has made wounded warriors like amputees feel more isolated, unable to connect as well with support groups. He said injured vets have seen disruptions in medical visits for pain management and other treatments. Within the Army, Helis said the virus has forced an increase in telehealth calls and online visits with mental health providers. That has generated some positive results, such as fewer missed appointments. “And we also think there was a reduction in the stigma of seeking behavioral health because you can do it from the privacy of your home,” he said. Military leaders also are encouraging troops to keep a closer eye on their buddies and ensure that those who need help get it. That message was conveyed in a remarkable public statement this month by Gen. John Hyten, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He said he sought help while heading U.S. Strategic Command from 2016 to 2019. He didn’t reveal details but said he saw a psychiatrist — a rare public admission by a senior officer. “I felt like I needed to get some help,” Hyten said in a video message. “I felt like I needed to talk to somebody.” He encouraged others to do the same, if needed, without fear of hurting their career. Need help? Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) Military veterans press 1. Individuals can also go to: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/talk-to-someone-now and veterans can go to woundedwarriorproject.org or call the project’s resource center at: 888-997-2586.

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Anxiety symptoms increased during the pandemic, Google Trends show

A new study has found a significant rise in people searching Google for anxiety symptoms during the pandemic.New research found that in the United States, Google searches for ‘worry,’ ‘anxiety,’ and therapeutic techniques to manage worry and anxiety have increased during the pandemic.The research, featuring as a commentary in the journal Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research,…

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A new study has found a significant rise in people searching Google for anxiety symptoms during the pandemic.New research found that in the United States, Google searches for ‘worry,’ ‘anxiety,’ and therapeutic techniques to manage worry and anxiety have increased during the pandemic.The research, featuring as a commentary in the journal Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, highlights the burden the COVID-19 pandemic has placed not only on people’s physical health but also their mental health.COVID-19 has had a profound effect on people. The world is approaching one million recorded deaths from the disease. And, some of those who recovered from the initial virus effects continue to suffer long-term symptoms that are yet to be fully understood.Once the knock-on effects of the disease factor in — for example, overwhelmed critical care units prolonging treatment times for people with other serious illnesses — then it is clear that the pandemic has had a devastating effect on people’s health around the world.However, as well as people’s physical health, it is also becoming clear that the pandemic is significantly affecting their mental health.Early in the pandemic, there were anecdotal reports that people’s mental health was worsening, including those with pre-existing mental health issues and those whose mental health was normally well. As time has gone on, more research has started to corroborate these reports.In the present study, the researchers wanted to explore an alternative way of determining the pandemic’s effects on mental health: analyzing Google search requests.Google Trends allows anyone to see the search terms that people use for various populations, globally and locally. As Dr. Michael Hoerger, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at Tulane University Cancer Center, New Orleans, and his co-authors note:“Although by no means a ‘window into the soul,’ people’s search terms reflect relatively uncensored desires for information and thus lack many of the biases of traditional self-report surveys.”Previous health science research has made use of Google Trends data in studies, and the present study’s investigators wanted to see how effective it could be in the context of mental health in the current pandemic.To do this, they accessed weekly U.S. search terms from April 21, 2019 to April 21, 2020.By comparing the pre- and post-pandemic search terms, the researchers were able to identify four relevant themes.Firstly, following the announcement of the pandemic, search terms related to ‘worry’ increased significantly. These terms included ‘worry,’ ‘worry health,’ ‘panic,’ and ‘hysteria.’Secondly, people shifted to searching for anxiety symptoms, which spiked after the initial flurry of worry-related search terms.Thirdly, the researchers did not see a significant increase in other mental health search terms, such as depression, loneliness, suicidal ideation, or substance abuse. Rather than interpreting this to suggest that these issues did not increase, the authors speculate that people’s searches relating to these issues may occur later, or that they may be better at utilizing self-care techniques concerning these.Finally, the researchers noticed that not only did people understandably search for more online therapy rather than face-to-face therapy, they also searched for therapy techniques for dealing with anxiety symptoms. Users did so with search terms such as ‘deep breathing’ and ‘body scan meditation.’For Dr. Hoerger, “[o]ur analyses from shortly after the pandemic declaration are the tip of the iceberg.”“Over time, we should begin to see a greater decline in societal mental health. This will likely include more depression, PTSD, community violence, suicide, and complex bereavement. For each person that dies of COVID, approximately nine close family members are affected, and people will carry that grief for a long time.”– Dr. Michael HoergerThe researchers suggest that by continuing to track Google Trends data, public health bodies may be able to better identify people’s mental health needs promptly, reducing the pandemic’s psychological effects.
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Dress code raises concerns over sexism on polar research mission | CBC News

A prominent Arctic research mission is coming under fire for a dress code policy that has highlighted concerns about systemic sexism in the polar sciences. The MOSAiC expedition, an international research mission led by Germany’s Alfred-Wegener-Institut, embedded polar researchers in Arctic sea ice for a full year to make groundbreaking observations about the Arctic climate.But…

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A prominent Arctic research mission is coming under fire for a dress code policy that has highlighted concerns about systemic sexism in the polar sciences. The MOSAiC expedition, an international research mission led by Germany’s Alfred-Wegener-Institut, embedded polar researchers in Arctic sea ice for a full year to make groundbreaking observations about the Arctic climate.But shortly after the journey began, women on board a support vessel for the mission, the Akademik Fedorov, were told they could not dress in tight-fitting clothing due to safety concerns. Journalist Chelsea Harvey was on board the ship for six weeks in October 2019 when the policy was first disclosed. She recently wrote about the rules for energy and environmental research trade publication E&E News. Halfway through her voyage, she said passengers were told that “thermal underwear” was prohibited as outerwear in common areas. The next day, Harvey said the mission’s leaders elaborated to say that “no leggings, no very tight fitting clothing — nothing too revealing — no crop tops, no hot pants, [and] no very short shorts” would be allowed. “We were told there are a lot of men onboard this ship … and some of them are going to be onboard this ship for months at a time,” Harvey told CBC News. “In my meeting … what we were told was this was a ‘safety issue.'” “It definitely sparked a lot of alarm and confusion at the beginning,” she said. “Everyone was sort of wondering, was there some sort of incident that triggered all of this?” A view of the Akademik Fedorov from the deck of Polarstern, the MOSAiC research vessel it supported. The ship was halfway into its journey when women were notified that tight-fitting clothing would be prohibited in common areas. (Alfred-Wegener-Institut/Esther Horvath CC-BY 4.0) Discussion of clothing policy followed sexual harassment In fact, as Harvey later confirmed with the Alfred-Wegener-Institut and the mission’s chief scientist, Thomas Krumpen, there had been an incident of sexual harassment aboard the Akademik Fedorov days before the policy was discussed. Several women said they had been harassed by a group of men on the ship, Harvey reported. They told Krumpen, which resulted in some members of the crew being prohibited from contact with several women on board. Days before the new rules were announced, several female participants reported they’d been harassed by a group of men on the ship, including technical contractors Krumpen told Harvey that the clothing policy had “no temporal and substantive connection, any connection, with a specific incident.” Reached by CBC, the Alfred-Wegener-Institut said in a statement that a clothing policy was always in effect and was communicated to passengers “independently from the incident.” “The policy is intended to ensure both adherence to standards of hygiene and occupational safety … as well as mutually respectful conduct,” the institute said in a statement.  “Throughout the MOSAiC expedition, the clothing policy’s importance and its applicability to everyone on board were repeatedly emphasized,” the statement continues. “Following violations of the policy on the part of individual persons on board the … Akademik Fedorov, the cruise lead explained the policies once again.” The day after those meetings … there was this dramatic transformation on board.- Chelsea Harvey, journalist on board Akademik Fedorov The institute could not provide CBC with a copy of the clothing policy, and the code of conduct distributed to all on board makes no mention of clothing. But the institute did say “clothing policies may reflect specific regulations issued by a given ship’s owner and commanding officers.” It’s not clear which policy prohibited fitted clothing. Harvey said, when discussed halfway into the support ship’s six-week journey in October, the policy came as a surprise to those on board the Akademik Fedorov. “We’re already here,” she said. “We can’t go out and buy new clothing.” The next day, there was a “dramatic transformation” on board, she said. “Everyone came out wearing the one pair of jeans that they brought,” Harvey said. “It just triggered a lot of widespread resentment, this idea that women should have to be responsible for managing the behaviour of men.” Harvey, a reporter for E&E News aboard the Akademik Federov, said the dress code ‘sparked a lot of alarm and confusion.’ (Submitted by Chelsea Harvey) Sexism widespread in polar science: expert “It’s totally unsurprising that women were horrified,” said Meredith Nash, a sociologist specializing in sexism in science at the University of Tasmania in Australia. “The assumption that … if a woman wears something fitted, then … she’s inviting harassment — that’s just so, so gross,” she said. Sexism, of both an overt and systemic kind, is widespread in the science and technology fields. Multiple studies show that women face discrimination and harassment in the polar sciences specifically, especially during field studies like the MOSAiC mission. Nash said in one study she performed, 60 per cent of female polar scientists she interviewed said they had experienced harassment at some point in their careers, usually while in junior positions. It just seems like there were so many missteps in the process of what happened there.- Meredith Nash, University of Tasmania sociologist Women were barred from many polar research missions until “well into the ’80s … because they were told we don’t have facilities for you, or you’re going to be a distraction to the men,” she said. Even today, the division of labour on board polar research vessels usually breaks down in highly gendered ways, with women “tasked with domestic duties” and excluded from field work, she said. Harvey documented instances of this at the MOSAiC School, the expedition’s training program for polar scientists, in her reporting for E&E. Nash said the decision to discuss the clothing policy after an incident of sexual harassment was a “knee-jerk, reactive [response] to blame it on the women … [instead of] a problematic workplace culture.” “It just seems like there were so many missteps in the process of what happened there,” she said. MOSAiC researchers in special survival gear go ashore after completing field training in Ny-Alesund, Norway. The Alfred-Wegener-Institut, which backed the expedition, said a clothing policy had always been in place, but could not provide CBC with a copy. (Alfred-Wegener-Institut/Esther Horvath CC-BY 4.0) Clothing policy still in place, but communicated earlier The Alfred-Wegener-Institut (AWI) told CBC in its statement that it took complaints about the clothing policy “very seriously.” “In order to avoid future misunderstandings … pre-expedition communications with participants were expanded” to include clothing policies. “The preparations for AWI expedition leaders were also intensified to help them sensitively handle and resolve the conflicts and misunderstandings … and, if necessary, to take appropriate action in response,” the statement reads. Harvey said the incident shows why more women must be in leadership in the polar sciences. Nash said it should spur a broader reckoning with the workplace culture aboard research vessels. The MOSAiC mission is set to wrap in October. At the end of her six weeks aboard the support ship, Harvey said she left the experience feeling disappointed. “Women go on these expeditions because they’re there to work and do their jobs … and it’s a shame these kinds of issues still come up.”
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