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Ryan Reynolds and Paul McCartney nominated for chief of First Nation in Ontario | CBC News

Walpole Island First Nation in southwestern Ontario is looking to have Ryan Reynolds and Paul McCartney removed as candidates for chief after members of the community nominated the two celebrities.  Under the Indian Act, First Nations can elect a non-Indigenous person as chief, though according to James Jenkins, Walpole Island’s director of operations, it’s quite rare. Jenkins said…

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Ryan Reynolds and Paul McCartney nominated for chief of First Nation in Ontario | CBC News

Walpole Island First Nation in southwestern Ontario is looking to have Ryan Reynolds and Paul McCartney removed as candidates for chief after members of the community nominated the two celebrities.  Under the Indian Act, First Nations can elect a non-Indigenous person as chief, though according to James Jenkins, Walpole Island’s director of operations, it’s quite rare. Jenkins said he’s not aware of non-Indigenous people, including celebrities, being elected in the past, but thinks there may have been other instances in Canadian Indigenous communities where a non-member has been on the ballot.  The exception would be in Walpole Island’s first election back in 1868, he said, when a government bureaucrat filled the position. The Indian Act, Jenkins said, has virtually no eligibility requirements for the position of chief, which allows anyone to be nominated and elected.  That’s one of the reasons the people of Walpole Island are pursuing their own constitution so that they don’t have to operate under the Indian Act and can more easily implement eligibility requirements for future chiefs.  ‘Some people are tickled by it’ Walpole Island council members are working to contact Reynolds and McCartney. If they can’t by 4 p.m. on Thursday, both candidates will be removed as nominees, said Jenkins.  Indigenous Services Canada and the region’s local electoral officer have been contacted to help, he said.  CBC News has reached out to Reynolds and McCartney but has not heard back.  Walpole Island First Nation director of operations James Jenkins says electing a non-Indigenous person as chief is rare for First Nation communities. (Tahmina Aziz/CBC) “As a public servant to the organization, I withheld any judgment, but I’m trying to make sure that we’re doing our best to provide good service for membership for the election,” Jenkins said.  “Some people are tickled by it and others probably feel like it may impact the sanctity of the electoral process,” he said. “Many people do find the electoral process a very important component of governance in the First Nation, so we’re trying to do our best to support the membership.”  Jenkins said he’s not sure if the nominations undermine the process, but thinks if a candidate isn’t aware of their standing, their name should be removed from the process. The Sept. 19 election currently has 12 chief nominees, including Reynolds and McCartney, and about 80 nominees for council. 
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Woman suspected of mailing ricin to White House arrested at U.S.-Canada border | CBC News

WorldThree U.S. law enforcement officials say a woman suspected of sending an envelope containing the poison ricin, which was addressed to White House and President Donald Trump, has been arrested at the New York-Canada border.RCMP says ‘initial information … suggests that the letter originated in Canada’The Associated Press · Posted: Sep 20, 2020 7:57 PM ET…

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Woman suspected of mailing ricin to White House arrested at U.S.-Canada border | CBC News

WorldThree U.S. law enforcement officials say a woman suspected of sending an envelope containing the poison ricin, which was addressed to White House and President Donald Trump, has been arrested at the New York-Canada border.RCMP says ‘initial information … suggests that the letter originated in Canada’The Associated Press · Posted: Sep 20, 2020 7:57 PM ET | Last Updated: September 21The RCMP is working with the FBI after federal U.S. officials intercepted an envelope addressed to the White House that contained the poison ricin. 1:59Three U.S. law enforcement officials say a woman suspected of sending an envelope containing the poison ricin, which was addressed to White House and President Donald Trump, has been arrested at the New York-Canada border. The officials say the woman was taken into custody by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers and is expected to face federal charges. The officials were not authorized to discuss the ongoing investigation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Aaron Bowker of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office confirmed with CBC News that the arrest took place at the Peace Bridge at Buffalo and that the individual was travelling from Canada into the U.S. An RCMP spokesperson told CBC News on Saturday that it was assisting the FBI in the investigation and that “initial information from the investigation suggests that the letter originated in Canada.”With files from CBC News
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Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins oppose vote on Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement before election

CLOSE Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died at age 87. Ginsburg is most noted for her lifelong fight for equality for women. USA TODAYSen. Lisa Murkowski definitively said Sunday she does not support voting on a nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court before the Nov. 3 election, repeating a belief…

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Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins oppose vote on Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement before election

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Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died at age 87. Ginsburg is most noted for her lifelong fight for equality for women.

USA TODAYSen. Lisa Murkowski definitively said Sunday she does not support voting on a nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court before the Nov. 3 election, repeating a belief she had expressed previously when the question was theoretical.”For weeks, I have stated that I would not support taking up a potential Supreme Court vacancy this close to the election. Sadly, what was then a hypothetical is now our reality, but my position has not changed,” the Alaska Republican said in a statement. Hours before Ginsburg’s death was announced, Murkowski told Alaska Public Media on Friday she would not vote on a nominee so close to an election. She cited the decision in 2016 not to move forward with a vote on Merrick Garland, who was nominated by then-President Barack Obama in March, because Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell thought it should be left up to the voters in November. “The closer you get to an election, that argument becomes even more important,” she said.November election: Trump, Democrats thrust Supreme Court fight forward as a central issue”I did not support taking up a nomination eight months before the 2016 election to fill the vacancy created by the passing of Justice Scalia,” Murkowski said Sunday. “We are now even closer to the 2020 election – less than two months out – and I believe the same standard must apply.” McConnell, R-Ky., has said the Senate would hold a full vote on President Donald Trump’s nominee. Trump has said he plans to offer up a nominee soon. Murkowski joins Sen. Susan Collins of Maine as the only two Senate Republicans to explicitly reject the idea of voting on a nominee before the election. Two more GOP senators would have to join them to give Democrats the 51 votes needed to block a potential nominee. On Saturday, Collins – a moderate from Maine who is locked in a tight battle for reelection – said “in order for the American people to have faith in their elected officials, we must act fairly and consistently – no matter which political party is in power.” She said Trump has the constitutional authority to put forward a nominee and she would have no problem with the Senate Judiciary Committee beginning the review process. “Given the proximity of the presidential election, however, I do not believe that the Senate should vote on the nominee prior to the election,” she said. “In fairness to the American people, who will either be re-electing the president or selecting a new one, the decision on a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court should be made by the President who is elected on November 3rd.” Who might succeed Justice Ginsburg?: Trump’s short list begins with these five women (and one man)Pelosi: Democrats ‘have our options’ when asked about impeaching Trump if he replaces GinsburgAutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideRead or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2020/09/20/lisa-murkowski-opposes-ruth-bader-ginsburg-replacement-before-election/5845511002/Find New & Used CarsNew CarsUsed CarsofPowered by Cars.com
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Montreal, Quebec City to face new restrictions as Quebec tries to fend off 2nd wave of COVID-19 | CBC News

The Quebec government is expected to announce today that it is reducing the size of private gatherings and imposing new restrictions on bars and restaurants in the province’s two biggest cities, after an increase in COVID-19 infections. Radio-Canada has learned that Montreal, Quebec City and the Chaudière-Appalaches region, which is south of Quebec City, will…

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Montreal, Quebec City to face new restrictions as Quebec tries to fend off 2nd wave of COVID-19 | CBC News

The Quebec government is expected to announce today that it is reducing the size of private gatherings and imposing new restrictions on bars and restaurants in the province’s two biggest cities, after an increase in COVID-19 infections. Radio-Canada has learned that Montreal, Quebec City and the Chaudière-Appalaches region, which is south of Quebec City, will be placed on “moderate alert.”That is the orange, or second-highest, alert level under the province’s regional system for categorizing the danger posed by the novel coronavirus. Government officials told Radio-Canada they are still finalizing their decision, but barring any other major developments, the announcement is expected to be made Sunday. On Saturday, Quebec reported 427 new cases of COVID-19, the highest daily increase since May. Being placed in the orange category — up from yellow, designated as the “early warning” level — will come with tightened public-health restrictions. According to Radio-Canada, these restrictions are likely to include:  Reducing the maximum number of people allowed at a private gathering from 10 to six. Reducing the maximum number of people allowed per restaurant table from 10 to six. Requiring bars to stop serving alcohol earlier than midnight. A provincewide police operation was conducted this weekend to investigate whether bars are respecting public-health rules. Sources told Radio-Canada that further measures could be taken pending the results of the operation.  Gatherings in indoor and outdoor public places are also expected to be limited to 50, as opposed to 250 people. But government officials said there will be exceptions to that rule. For example, in theatres and cinemas where physical distancing is easily respected, the 250-person limit would remain, but wearing a mask would be mandatory at all times, even when seated. It is still unclear whether school activities will be affected by the decision to place the three regions in the orange level. Quebec Health Minister Christian Dubé, public health director Dr. Horacio Arruda and Dr. Éric Litvak, medical advisor to public health, will give an update on the COVID-19 situation in Montreal at 5 p.m. ET Sunday.
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