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Maya Rudolph reacts to Kamala Harris VP pick: ‘Oh s—‘

Watch Rudolph learn the news and discuss her return as Harris on Saturday Night Live. It’s official: Joe Biden has selected Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate in the 2020 election. And Maya Rudolph, who played Harris during the Democratic presidential debates on Saturday Night Live, has some thoughts. “That’s spicy,” she told EW. The…

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Watch Rudolph learn the news and discuss her return as Harris on Saturday Night Live.

It’s official: Joe Biden has selected Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate in the 2020 election. And Maya Rudolph, who played Harris during the Democratic presidential debates on Saturday Night Live, has some thoughts.
“That’s spicy,” she told EW.
The news that Harris has been selected as Biden’s choice for vice president broke while Rudolph happened to be recording a panel discussion with EW and other Emmy nominees. Coincidentally, Rudolph is Emmy nominated for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series for her portrayal of Harris on the sketch show. Watch the video above to see Rudolph learn the news when another panelist — Angela Bassett — got word of the pick and shared with the group on the Zoom call.

“Oh s—,” Rudolph immediately responded upon hearing the news.
“Somebody’s gonna be very busy now,” Wanda Sykes teased, alluding to Rudolph’s return to SNL. “Ruh-roh,” Rudolph responded, before going on to address the likelihood that she’ll reprise her turn as Harris.
“I love going to the show. Any excuse I can get, I love. I just didn’t really anticipate traveling during a pandemic, but if there’s anyone that can work it out I’m sure Lorne [Michaels] has some sort of invisible helicopter that can get me there,” she joked.

Will Heath/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty

“Ever since I was a kid, truly, I wanted to be on any kind of SCTV, Saturday Night Live, and I can’t believe that I got to work there, and I can’t believe that it’s my family still,” she continued. “I’m so thrilled to even be associated with the show and that I got to go back. It’s like the gift that keeps on giving. Honestly, it’s my favorite place to play.”

Rudolph continued to express her shock and delight, especially the joy of being Emmy nominated for her work as Harris, saying, “I’m as surprised as you are, guys. That’s spicy.”
“I don’t know that I’m ready to go right this minute, but it’s so nice to have this nomination be associated with the show because it’s my true love.”
So it seems Rudolph is likely to return as soon as some safety precautions are determined. Just your average complications of mounting television production during a pandemic in an election year.

EW’s complete discussion with double Emmy nominees Rudolph, Bassett, Sykes, Dan Levy, Ramy Youssef, and Giancarlo Esposito will be on EW.com on Aug. 24.
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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s top opinions and dissents, from VMI to Voting Rights Act

WASHINGTON – Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday at the age of 87, surrounded by her family.Only the second woman to serve on the nation’s highest court, she dressed for decisions and dissents. She had a special collar, or jabot, for announcing majority opinions from the bench and another for her frequent, and more…

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WASHINGTON – Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday at the age of 87, surrounded by her family.Only the second woman to serve on the nation’s highest court, she dressed for decisions and dissents. She had a special collar, or jabot, for announcing majority opinions from the bench and another for her frequent, and more celebrated, dissents.Throughout her career, Ginsburg’s diminutive presence belied her titanic influence on the law, first as the nation’s preeminent litigator for women’s rights, and more recently as the leader of the high court’s liberal bloc, where she served as a bulwark against an increasingly conservative majority.Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dissents were the subject of a 2016 picture book for children. (Photo: Simon & Schuster)Here’s a look at some of her memorable opinions:DecisionsUnited States v. Virginia (1996): Struck down Virginia Military Institute’s male-only admissions policy as a violation of the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause. The vote was 7-1, with Associate Justice Antonin Scalia dissenting. Ginsburg described as “presumptively invalid … a law or official policy that denies to women, simply because they are women, equal opportunity to aspire, achieve, participate in, and contribute to society, based upon what they can do.”Justice Ginsburg’s most famous Supreme Court opinion opened the doors of Virginia Military Institute to students like Chih-Yuan Ho and Melissa Kay Graham, the first two women to graduate in 1999. (Photo: MANDI WRIGHT, Associated Press)Olmstead v. L.C. (1999): Ruled 6-3 that individuals with mental disabilities have the right to community-based housing under the Americans with Disabilities Act, provided that states have sufficient resources and treatment professionals say it’s appropriate.”Institutional placement of persons who can handle and benefit from community settings perpetuates unwarranted assumptions that persons so isolated are incapable or unworthy of participating in community life.”Friends of the Earth v. Laidlaw Environmental Services (2000): By a 7-2 vote, gave South Carolina residents standing to seek penalties for industrial pollution without having to prove injury, and even though the factory in question had closed. “A would-be polluter may or may not be dissuaded by the existence of a remedy on the books, but a defendant once hit in its pocketbook will surely think twice before polluting again.”Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission (2015): Ruled 5-4 that states can try to remove partisan politics from the process of drawing political maps by creating commissions that take power away from elected legislators. “Arizona voters sought to restore the core principle that voters should choose their representatives, not the other way around. The elections clause, we affirm, does not hinder that endeavor.”Timbs v. Indiana (2019): Ruled unanimously that states cannot impose excessive fees, fines and forfeitures as criminal penalties. The decision made clear that the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against excessive fines applies to states and localities as well as the federal government. “The protection against excessive fines guards against abuses of government’s punitive or criminal law-enforcement authority. This safeguard, we hold, is ‘fundamental to our scheme of ordered liberty.”http://www.usatoday.com/”DissentsBush v. Gore (2000): Ginsburg and her three liberal colleagues each dissented from the court’s 5-4 decision halting the presidential recount ordered by Florida’s Supreme Court. The majority ruled that no better method of counting votes could be established within the necessary timetable.”The court’s conclusion that a constitutionally adequate recount is impractical is a prophecy the court’s own judgment will not allow to be tested. Such an untested prophecy should not decide the presidency of the United States.”Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. (2007): Ginsburg wrote the dissent in the 5-4 case, which denied Lilly Ledbetter the right to sue her employer for gender-based pay discrimination because of the length of time that had passed since the violation.Lilly Ledbetter receives a pen from President Barack Obama after he signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in 2009, two years after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg urged Congress to fix what she said was the Supreme Court’s mistake. (Photo: Mark Wilson, Getty Images)”Our precedent suggests, and lower courts have overwhelmingly held, that the unlawful practice is the current payment of salaries infected by gender-based (or race-based) discrimination – a practice that occurs whenever a paycheck delivers less to a woman than to a similarly situated man.”Gonzales v. Carhart (2007): Ginsburg wrote the dissent in the 5-4 case, which upheld a 2003 law passed by Congress outlawing a form of late-term abortion. The majority ruled that it was not an undue burden on abortion rights.”The act, and the court’s defense of it, cannot be understood as anything other than an effort to chip away at a right declared again and again by this court – and with increasing comprehension of its centrality to women’s lives.”Shelby County v. Holder (2013): Perhaps Ginsburg’s most famous dissent criticized Chief Justice John Roberts’ 5-4 ruling that struck down a key section of the Voting Rights Act, freeing mostly southern states from having to clear voting changes with the federal government.”Throwing out preclearance when it has worked and is continuing to work to stop discriminatory changes is like throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet.”Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores (2014): Ginsburg wrote the dissent in the 5-4 case, which determined that family-owned and other closely held companies cannot be forced to offer insurance coverage for certain birth control methods they equate with abortion.”Approving some religious claims while deeming others unworthy of accommodation could be perceived as favoring one religion over another, the very risk the Establishment Clause was designed to preclude. The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield.”AutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideRead or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/18/i-dissent-justice-ruth-bader-ginsburgs-most-memorable-opinions/2661426002/Find New & Used CarsNew CarsUsed CarsofPowered by Cars.com
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150,000 Covid-19 cases quarantined so far in Abu Dhabi

‘These are common public health practices that contribute to preventing the spread of infectious diseases’ More than 150,000 cases of Covid-19 were admitted to quarantine centres or underwent home isolation in Abu Dhabi so far, the local health authority said on Saturday. The Department of Health (DoH) said more than 70 isolation centres have been…

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‘These are common public health practices that contribute to preventing the spread of infectious diseases’

More than 150,000 cases of Covid-19 were admitted to quarantine centres or underwent home isolation in Abu Dhabi so far, the local health authority said on Saturday. The Department of Health (DoH) said more than 70 isolation centres have been established across the emirate.
“The DoH, in collaboration with the Abu Dhabi Public Health Centre (ADPHC) and the authorities concerned, has prepared quarantine and home quarantine and home isolation locations that have been set up for Covid-19 patients and those who have been in direct contact with them,” the DoH said its tweet. “The DoH is keen to provide the best healthcare services, raise the absorptive capacity according to the needs of the sector, and establish a clear working mechanism with a preventive framework to track cases, control infection and limit the spread of the virus.”
The health authority noted that people are sent to quarantine facilities and home isolation according to the situation. Suspected or confirmed Covid-19 patients are kept at isolation centres to avoid the spread of the virus. And quarantine facilities are for separating and restricting the activities of healthy people for a period of time as determined by the health authorities concerned.
“These are common public health practices that contribute to preventing the spread of infectious diseases. Isolation and quarantine are imposed on infected individuals or those who have had contact with an infected person, by separating them from healthy people in order to prevent the spread of disease.”

DoH, in collaboration with @adphc_ae & the concerned authorities, has prepared quarantine and home isolation locations that have been set up for #COVID19 patients & those who have been in direct contact with them. pic.twitter.com/9V3Feda3aF
– ????? ????? – ?????? (@DoHSocial) September 19, 2020
Meanwhile, Abu Dhabi Public Health Centre is placing awareness notices at the entrances to residential units with self-quarantine cases. The initiative is aimed at limiting the spread of the virus and increasing community awareness on the importance of safe distancing measures.Also, people arriving in Abu Dhabi have to undergo a mandatory Covid-19 PCR test and wear a tracking wristband during a 14-day home quarantine.

@adphc_ae to provide awareness notices at entrances to residential units with self-quarantine cases, as part of efforts to limit the spread of the virus and increase community awareness on physical distancing measures. pic.twitter.com/hsfZJWY36V
– ???? ?????? ???????? (@admediaoffice) September 18, 2020
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Ashwani Kumar
I am a newspaperman from the emirate of Abu Dhabi. A journalist at heart. I get my stories from the streets. A south Indian born in the Hindi heartland, I easily connect with people from different nationalities and cultures. I am calm like a monk, sensitive and very patient reporter. On the ground, I cover a range of topics related to community, health, embassy, tourism, transport, business and sports. I will go out on a leg to do what’s right and stand by what I believe in.

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Trixie Mattel’s Twangy Cover, Aquihayaquihay’s Sunny Future, And More Songs We Love

Allan Villanueva / Getty Images The search for the ever-elusive “bop” is difficult. Playlists and streaming-service recommendations can only do so much. They often leave a lingering question: Are these songs really good, or are they just new? Enter Bop Shop, a hand-picked selection of songs from the MTV News team. This weekly collection doesn’t…

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Allan Villanueva / Getty Images

The search for the ever-elusive “bop” is difficult. Playlists and streaming-service recommendations can only do so much. They often leave a lingering question: Are these songs really good, or are they just new?
Enter Bop Shop, a hand-picked selection of songs from the MTV News team. This weekly collection doesn’t discriminate by genre and can include anything — it’s a snapshot of what’s on our minds and what sounds good. We’ll keep it fresh with the latest music, but expect a few oldies (but goodies) every once in a while, too. Get ready: The Bop Shop is now open for business.

Aquihayaquihay: “Sencillo”

Something is frayed on “Sencillo,” the wonderfully languid latest effort from self-described “anti-boy band” Aquihayaquihay. As much as Steve Aoki’s label signees sound embattled as they sing in Spanish, the sounds themselves direct the song’s emotionality toward hope. Embracing both modern bedroom-production hallmarks and an exploration of past R&B-pop sounds, “Sencillo” plays like a completely welcome meeting of past and present while also pointing to a sunny future. —Patrick Hosken

Trixie Mattel: “Video Games”

Trixie Mattel opened up a beer and said, “Get over here and play my ‘Video Games.'” The RuPaul’s Drag Race legend takes her body to Pioneertown and gives Lana Del Rey’s 2011 melancholy single an Old West country-music twist. The dramatic cover features Trixie strumming her trusty autoharp, but it also serves cowboy shootout realness with some ominous desert outlaw whistles. We hope you like the bad girls, honey, because Trixie really brought it with this cover. Lana Del Rey? More like Lana Del SLAY. —Chris Rudolph

Kristen Ford: “Stick Shift Corolla”

Nashville-based alt rocker Kristen Ford piles on the breakup feels in this moody track from No Plans, her new EP. Tension grows verse by angst-fueled verse. “I don’t want you back / Time don’t work like that,” Ford insists, although if the explosive guitar and drums punctuating the final verse are any indication, that realization doesn’t undo the hurt that’s been done. —Sam Manzella

Lulu Simon: “Strangers”

Pop music has a new rising star, and she comes from a pretty impressive pedigree. On her new single “Strangers,” Lulu Simon, daughter of Paul Simon and Edie Brickell, gets breezily bitter about an ex who can’t quite accept that a relationship has met its expiration. Over a stacked production of ’80s synths and electronica pops, Simon’s lyrics read like a diary or a heated string of texts — you know, the unhinged ones you send in quick succession to a friend when you’ve got some feelings and you’ve got to get them out. Considering that her sarcastic yet sweet debut “Wasted” is just as much of a bop, it looks like there’s more where that came from. —Carson Mlnarik

Cautious Clay: “Agreeable”

Cautious Clay’s voice is smooth, his arms are open wide, and on “Agreeable,” he sounds about a thousand miles high. Much like “Cheesin’,” the virtual posse cut he anchored earlier this year, the elastic artist stretches and flexes in equal measure here — but the party’s over in just two minutes. Before you know, you’re back on the ground. You might not even know you left it. —Patrick Hosken

John K: “Happiness”

The lyrical melancholy of the emerging pop crooner John K’s latest single betrays its peppy title. Here, “Happiness” functions less like an expression of joy than a painful reminder of better days long gone: “Happiness, are you there? / Are you gone? Are you comin’ back?” Yet, delivered by a voice that a new listener might mistake for Troye Sivan or Sam Smith, it seems pleasant all the same. —Coco Romack

Bosco: “4th of July”

The chorus finds Bosco directing your gaze upwards — “Bombs bursting into the sky” — but even fireworks on Independence Day might have a hard time keeping your attention in this plush ecosystem populated with silken guitar waves and a treasure chest full of booming R&B rhythm. Don’t let the title fool you; this is a leafy autumn song through and through. —Patrick Hosken

Bop Shop
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Cautious Clay
Trixie Mattel
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