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Activist leader beats 20-year Democratic veteran

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Cori Bush, a racial justice activist who was once homeless, has ousted a 10-term political veteran in Missouri’s Democratic primary election.She defeated Congressman William Lacy Clay 49% – 46%. Either Mr Clay or his father, a civil rights activist, has held the seat since the 1960s.An ordained minister and former nurse, Ms Bush would be the first black woman to represent Missouri in Congress.Her win is the latest upset against establishment Democrats by newcomers.She had campaigned for Senator Bernie Sanders during his presidential run.Praising her on Twitter, Mr Sanders said Ms Bush would “take on the corporate elite of this country when she gets to Congress”.

Ms Bush, 44, had lost to Mr Clay, 64, during the 2018 primary in Missouri. Mr Clay is a long-time lawmaker who has represented the St Louis area for two decades. His father is a co-founder of the Congressional Black Caucus. Mr Clay campaigned on his congressional record while highlighting Ms Bush’s lack of political experience.Her primary win all but guarantees her a spot in Congress, representing the strongly Democratic district. It follows a number of shake-ups in the 2020 election cycle. In June, House Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel lost his New York seat to middle-school principal Jamaal Bowman.The wins show the influence of the Democratic left wing ahead of November’s presidential election, where moderate Joe Biden will face off against Republican President Donald Trump.Ms Bush spoke to supporters on Tuesday, saying many people expected her to lose.”They counted us out,” she said, according to CBS News. “I’m just the protester, I’m just the activist with no name, no title and no real money. That’s all they said that I was. But St Louis showed up today.”Ms Bush had to quit her job at a preschool when she fell ill while pregnant with her second child in 2001. She and her then-husband were evicted from their home, and – along with their baby and young son – were homeless for several months, living out of their car. The pair eventually divorced.Since then, Ms Bush has earned a degree in nursing and became a pastor, before also becoming a racial justice activist. Ms Bush led protests in Ferguson in 2014, following the police killing of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown.

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Cori Bush (left) hugs her daughter before her victory speech

During her 2020 campaign, she was backed by the Justice Democrats, who campaigned for her friend and fellow progressive Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in 2018.The Justice Democrats group praised her win as a “Black Lives Matter organiser” defeating a “corporate-backed political dynasty”.Primary elections also took place in Michigan, Arizona, Kansas and Washington state on Tuesday. Former Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach lost the state’s Republican primary Senate election to more moderate Congressman Roger Marshall. The outcome is a relief to Republicans, who feared a win for Mr Kobach, a controversial conservative, could flip the Senate seat.Mr Kobach lost the 2018 gubernatorial race to Democratic candidate Laura Kelly despite backing from President Trump. In Michigan, Democratic Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib has won her rematch with Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones, with 90% of the votes counted. Ms Tlaib received 66% of the votes to Ms Jones’ 33%.Ms Tlaib is a member of the group of progressive first-term congresswomen known as “the squad”, along with Ms Ocasio-Cortez.”Voters sent a clear message that they’re done waiting for transformative change, that they want an unapologetic fighter who will take on the status quo and win,” Ms Tlaib said in a statement to US media.

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Families struggle as heavy rain, more floods expected in Sudan

Thousands of people continue to live under the threat of incoming heavy rain and further flooding in parts of Sudan, months after floods ravaged nearly all of the country’s states. Since July, at least 115 people have been killed in the aftermath of days of torrential rains that brought record-breaking flash floods. The African nation through which…

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Thousands of people continue to live under the threat of incoming heavy rain and further flooding in parts of Sudan, months after floods ravaged nearly all of the country’s states.
Since July, at least 115 people have been killed in the aftermath of days of torrential rains that brought record-breaking flash floods.
The African nation through which the Nile river flows is in the middle of its rainy season, which lasts from June to October.
The United Nations is scaling up emergency food assistance, and hundreds of thousands of people are living in desperate conditions in makeshift camps.

Hanan Shariff, a flood victim, has been living in a makeshift camp for the past 13 days in Sinjah, a town in the southwestern state of Sennar, after the floods submerged her village.
“We tried to build fences to protect our home but the winds were too strong, so we decided to salvage what we could and fled,” Shariff told Al Jazeera.

Sudan’s Sinnar state flooding: Families find shelter in schools

The rain and flooding exceeded records set in 1946 and 1988, forcing the government to declare a three-month state of emergency.
In recent days, the government has issued new warnings to communities living on the banks of the Nile that rains in the highlands of Ethiopia could lead to more flooding along the river, said Al Jazeera’s Mohammed Adow, reporting from Sinjah.
A total of 18 villages in Sennar state are “marooned by the floodwaters and cut off from the rest of the state,” Adow said.
Rowda Tayyib said people have “lost all hope”.
“The floods destroyed our homes and swept away our livestock and everything we owned. We have nothing left,” she told Al Jazeera.
A committee tasked with dealing with the ramifications of the floods warned two weeks ago that the country may face more rains, adding that the water level in the Blue Nile rose to a record 17.58 metres.
The floods have so far affected more than half a million people and caused the total and partial collapse of more than 100,000 homes in at least 16 Sudanese states.
Camps for the displaced are growing in number and size in the outskirts of Sinjah, according to Adow.
Mutwali Adam of the UN children’s fund (UNICEF) said people at the camp require “basic humanitarian needs like food, shelters and medicine”.
“Local communities provided some food, and also we complement each other as humanitarian actors here in the field,” Adam told Al Jazeera.
The dire humanitarian situation has been exacerbated by the country’s economic downfall and political deadlock. The government declared an economic state of emergency after its currency fell sharply in recent weeks.
The cost of food and transport have continued to soar across the country.
According to Adow, prices of some staple foods like bread and sugar have increased by 50 percent over the past few weeks, with many fearing the crisis will worsen.

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LendingTree, LLC is a Marketing Lead Generator and is a Duly Licensed Mortgage Broker, as required by law, with its main office located at 11115 Rushmore Dr., Charlotte, NC 28277, Telephone Number 866-501-2397 (TDD/TTY). NMLS Unique Identifier #1136. LendingTree, LLC is known as LT Technologies in lieu of true name LendingTree, LLC in NY. LendingTree technology and processes are patented under U.S. Patent Nos. 6,385,594 and 6,611,816 and licensed under U.S. Patent Nos. 5,995,947 and 5,758,328. © LendingTree, LLC. All Rights Reserved. This site is directed at, and made available to, persons in the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii only.

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dead: Hillary Clinton, More Stars React

Honoring Her Honor. Tributes poured in from stars after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday, September 18, at age 87. The Supreme Court confirmed that the judge died at her home in Washington after complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. “Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,” Chief Justice…

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Honoring Her Honor. Tributes poured in from stars after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday, September 18, at age 87.
The Supreme Court confirmed that the judge died at her home in Washington after complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas.
“Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,” Chief Justice John Roberts said in a statement. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”
Ginsburg was hospitalized for a potential infection in July. “She underwent an endoscopic procedure at Johns Hopkins this afternoon to clean out a bile duct stent that was placed last August,” spokeswoman Kathleen Arberg told CNN in a statement at the time.
The Brooklyn native previously suffered from acute cholecystitis, a benign gallbladder condition which she received treatment for in May. She was hospitalized in November 2018 after fracturing three ribs in a fall. She underwent surgery to remove two cancerous nodules the following month.

Ginsburg fought cancer four times, most recently in August 2019. She announced in January that she was cancer-free.
The judge became an icon for women’s rights as she served on the Supreme Court, to which she was appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993. She was only the second female justice after Sandra Day O’Connor. Before serving on the country’s highest court, she studied at Cornell, graduated from Columbia Law School and became the first female tenured professor at Columbia.
Ginsburg made her mark on pop culture in recent years. Not only did Kate McKinnon spoof her on Saturday Night Live, but she was also the subject of the 2018 documentary RBG and the 2018 biopic On the Basis of Sex. Felicity Jones portrayed her in the movie and confessed she was “insanely nervous” to meet her.
“I felt like I wanted to curtsy,” the actress, 36, exclusively told Us Weekly in January 2019. “Ruth was incredibly welcoming. We went to her office first and it felt like a very warm environment — covered in photographs of friends and family and all sorts of mementos that had been sent to her by her fans.”
Scroll down to see tributes to Ginsburg.

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