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Texas Covid-19 hot spot is facing a ‘tsunami’ of patients, overwhelming hospitals

Dallas (CNN)Jessica Ortiz said she and her twin brother, Jubal, were inseparable. Even when Jubal lay dead in an open casket with plexiglass over his body — out of fear he could still be contagious with coronavirus — she couldn’t help but lean down and touch him at his viewing earlier this month.Now, weeks later,…

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Texas Covid-19 hot spot is facing a ‘tsunami’ of patients, overwhelming hospitals

Dallas (CNN)Jessica Ortiz said she and her twin brother, Jubal, were inseparable. Even when Jubal lay dead in an open casket with plexiglass over his body — out of fear he could still be contagious with coronavirus — she couldn’t help but lean down and touch him at his viewing earlier this month.Now, weeks later, she wears a necklace with his ashes. “He meant the world,” Jessica, who is from Hidalgo County in South Texas, said, remembering her 27-year-old brother. “I just wish it wasn’t him.”Health experts say there’s no evidence that bodies are contagious after death, but the moment speaks to the fear and concern in Hidalgo County, where health officials say Covid-19 is wreaking havoc on communities. Hospitals started reaching capacity earlier this month in the Rio Grande Valley, which has become the main hotspot in Texas. “It’s a tsunami what we’re seeing right now,” said Dr. Federico Vallejo, a critical care pulmonologist. Vallejo said he’s treating nearly 50 to 60 patients a day. Sometimes he takes care of 70. Normally, a critical care doctor sees about 15 to 20 patients during a rotation for a critical care doctor, according to Vallejo.Vallejo said walking through the hallways at the hospital is a “massive shock,” and he worries about the mental health of his colleagues who are overwhelmed with the sheer number of patients. “It’s not easy to handle something like this.”The situation has grown so dire that Hidalgo County officials threatened this week to criminally prosecute people who don’t quarantine after testing positive for Covid-19. Hidalgo County Judge Richard Cortez issued a shelter-at-home order for all residents starting Wednesday. The order includes a curfew, travel limitations and facial covering requirements and comes as the county’s hospitals have hit capacity, Cortez said.”Please stay in compliance and protect yourself and your loved ones by following these important steps,” Hidalgo County officials tweeted on Tuesday. “Failure to comply could result in criminal prosecution.”The state’s responseThe state of Texas has identified 351,071 Covid-19 cases, and 4,199 deaths as of Tuesday afternoon, according to Johns Hopkins University data. On Monday, Hidalgo County reported 34 new deaths due to Covid-19 complications, and 524 new cases. Dr. Peter Hotez of the Baylor College of Medicine said Southern states like Texas and Florida are seeing increased deaths because “the hospitals are overwhelmed.” “We had 34 deaths in the last 24 hours in not a very large county, so South Texas is just getting hit incredibly hard,” Hotez said Tuesday on CNN. Texas was one of the first states to reopen in May after Gov. Greg Abbott ended the state’s stay-at-home order and allowed businesses such as retail stores, malls, restaurants and theaters to reopen that day at limited capacity.In late June, Abbott announced he was pausing any further phases to reopen the state as cases surged.While Abbott implemented a mask requirement for nearly all Texans in early July, he has kept in place a ban on local officials from issuing stay-at-home orders, despite increasing pressure from leaders of major areas like Houston and Dallas.In an interview Tuesday night with CNN affiliate KRGV in McAllen, Abbott acknowledged the dramatic numbers coming out of the Rio Grande Valley. “You’re having record breaking number of people testing positive, record-breaking number of people hospitalized including in the intensive care units as well as, unfortunately, far too many deaths,” he said. Abbott said he supported the Hidalgo County judge’s decision to enforce curfews but did not explicitly support the shelter-at-home order when asked about it. Abbott’s office said earlier Tuesday the order lacked legal authority and was more of a recommendation. “There are parts of the orders which I have the complete latitude to enforce, such as the curfew,” Abbott said. “That is the authority that the local County judges always have been including right now, and it’s my understanding that in Cameron and Hidalgo County they intend to be enforcing curfews. That is one of the strategies to make sure they reduce the number of people out and about.”The governor said the state has already sent 1,200 medical personnel to the region and he expects to send more. The US Navy said in a statement on Tuesday it was also deploying some 70 medical personnel to support civilian hospitals in Texas. The US Army has also sent medical professionals to the Rio Grande Hospital.Abbott, who spoke with officials and hospital executives in the Rio Grande Valley earlier Tuesday, said the state is working to partner with hotels to provide rooms for people who are recovering from Covid-19 but can’t go home yet so they don’t infect others. The governor pleaded with audiences to wear masks and take the virus seriously. “It is essential that everybody — not just leaders — but every resident in the Rio Grande Valley understand: You need to be wearing a face mask or face covering when you go out.”South Texas needs more help, doctor saysDr. Ivan Melenedez, the Health Authority in Hidalgo County and a practicing physician, said the region needs all the help it can get.”If I found a lamp on the beach and I rubbed it and the genie came out, my first wish would be: President Trump please, please send the USNS Mercy,” he said, referring to Navy hospital ship that’s been used to alleviate hospital stress during the pandemic. “Let’s park it out in the Gulf, which is, you know, 35 miles away. That gives us 1,000 beds with all the personnel attached to it.”That would also help the medical professionals who’ve been working 18-hour days for weeks on end finally have a break, he said. “Boy, that would be a gift from God.”Melendez described the hospitals in South Texas as a parallel universe — buildings that look peaceful from the outside but are going through hell on the inside. “If (people) only knew what lurks behind those walls as they’re driving down the expressway,” he said. “If they could only have X-ray vision and see the the pain and the suffering.”The reasons why the region is hit so hard are two-fold, according to Melendez. First, he pointed to the high rates of diabetes and obesity in the Rio Grande Valley. Combined with poverty and limited access to health care, those comorbidities make combatting coronavirus a huge battle for many.Melendez also noted the proximity to Mexico. “Their infrastructure is non-existent. You can’t even go to a hospital right now,” he said. “So if you put a point and then draw a circle around where we live and go three hours every way, there’s 14 million people — the majority of them living in Mexico.””They’re human beings — we don’t care about immigration status” he added. “They come in, we got to take care of them.”The Hispanic community has been disproportionately hurt by the coronavirus pandemic. In Hidalgo County, where 92.5% of the county’s 860,000 residents identify as Latinx, Dr. Hotez told CNN many of the victims are poor, Hispanic, working in jobs deemed essential and that they have to be at work to support their families.”There are many stories across Texas and across the southern United States among Hispanic and Latinx communities just getting hammered, and we’re not really getting a full accounting of this,” Hotez said.Lag times in reporting of cases, deathsIn nearby Cameron County, which includes Brownsville, officials claim the death toll is much larger than what is being reported.In a press conference Monday, Cameron County Judge Eddie Treviño Jr. said that the reporting of both positive cases and number of fatalities is running behind in the county. He said the reason is due to the health department being overwhelmed with the number of cases and deaths growing over the past six weeks.”We literally cannot keep up,” Treviño said. He said the hospitals are at 115% of regular Covid-19 dedicated bed capacity, and that 91.7% of the Covid-19 dedicated ICU beds are in use. Dr. James Castillo, the public health authority for the county health department, said during the press conference that the number of deaths would lag in reporting by a month or more. The reporting system is manual, and he said the staff is overwhelmed.Statewide, Texas announced its highest hospitalization number yet on Tuesday, with 10,848 people currently in hospitals, according to the latest data from the Texas Department of State Health Services.Vallejo, the critical care pulmonologist in McAllen, said he is grappling with frustration as he watches his colleagues work tirelessly in exposed environments — yet he still hears reports of people ignoring social distance guidelines on the outside.”They’re going out and they’re doing barbecues and they’re doing parties and they’re doing a soccer practice or they’re going to the beach here in South Padre Island,” Vallejo said. “It’s so hard to try to understand … Do they think that their life has more value than the health care workers that eventually will take care of them if they get sick? Because we will. No matter what. We will.”CNN’s Stephanie Becker, Christina Maxouris, Jen Christensen and Nicole Chavez contributed to this report.
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We asked Trump supporters to show us their Facebook feeds – CNN Video

Most stock quote data provided by BATS. Market indices are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes. All times are ET. Disclaimer. Morningstar: Copyright 2018 Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Factset: FactSet Research Systems Inc.2018. All rights reserved. Chicago Mercantile Association: Certain market data is the property of…

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We asked Trump supporters to show us their Facebook feeds – CNN Video

Most stock quote data provided by BATS. Market indices are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes. All times are ET. Disclaimer. Morningstar: Copyright 2018 Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Factset: FactSet Research Systems Inc.2018. All rights reserved. Chicago Mercantile Association: Certain market data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Dow Jones: The Dow Jones branded indices are proprietary to and are calculated, distributed and marketed by DJI Opco, a subsidiary of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC and have been licensed for use to S&P Opco, LLC and CNN. Standard & Poor’s and S&P are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC and Dow Jones is a registered trademark of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC. All content of the Dow Jones branded indices Copyright S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC 2018 and/or its affiliates.© 2020 Cable News Network.A Warner Media Company.All Rights Reserved.CNN Sans ™ & © 2016 Cable News Network.
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Trump’s use of false content is often defended as humor. But his supporters aren’t always in on the joke

Bemidji, Minnesota (CNN)At a Trump rally in Bemidji, Minnesota, last Friday, grievances against social media platforms Twitter and Facebook were a common refrain. Many of the President’s supporters told CNN that they felt the platforms’ fact-checking processes were biased against conservative viewpoints. Others discussed social media posts that contained manipulated media as if they were…

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Trump’s use of false content is often defended as humor. But his supporters aren’t always in on the joke

Bemidji, Minnesota (CNN)At a Trump rally in Bemidji, Minnesota, last Friday, grievances against social media platforms Twitter and Facebook were a common refrain. Many of the President’s supporters told CNN that they felt the platforms’ fact-checking processes were biased against conservative viewpoints. Others discussed social media posts that contained manipulated media as if they were real. “Like when Joe Biden fell asleep during a live interview on television,” one supporter recalled, describing a video that went viral only a few weeks prior to the rally. The video — which appears to show Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden sleeping as a TV news anchor repeats, “Wake up!” — was shared on Twitter by White House social media director Dan Scavino. It was achieved by splicing together real footage of a 2011 interview between journalist Leyla Santiago, now of CNN, and entertainer and activist Harry Belafonte with footage of Biden looking down, his eyes appearing at least partially closed, to make it appear as if he were snoozing. An audio track of loud snoring was placed on the video to complete the effect. When the video was fact-checked by news outlets, including CNN, and eventually labeled as “manipulated media” by Twitter, prominent Trump supporters complained that it was an obvious joke and a meme. Asked last week why Trump shares fake videos and baseless conspiracy theories about Biden, Tim Murtaugh, Trump campaign communications director, invoked a meme defense. “You call it a fake video. What it is is an internet meme,” he said. “Those are very frequently done to make a political point.” The joke was lost on Chris, the Trump supporter in Bemidji, who apparently believed the video was real footage. He acknowledged, “I missed that one,” when he was shown how the video had been manipulated. But the fact the video was faked didn’t change his impression of Biden because he believed something like that could happen, Chris said. Chris said he did not want to share his last name. The dissemination of misleading videos about Biden by the Trump campaign in an effort to make the Democratic presidential nominee seem confused or senile has happened repeatedly. On Tuesday, the campaign posted an eight-second video on Facebook that it titled “Joe Biden completely botches the Pledge of Allegiance.” But Biden was not trying to recite the entire Pledge of Allegiance as the full version of the video shows. Facebook did not take any action against the video. Despite promises from Silicon Valley to tackle election misinformation, videos that contain manipulated media often go unchecked and are viewed millions of times without context. Last week, Trump retweeted a video that was manipulated to make it appear as if Biden was dancing to the NWA song “F**k tha Police.” He wasn’t. When false claims and doctored videos are fact-checked by Facebook or labeled as manipulated by Twitter, it is possible that they have already been viewed and shared for days. And many of the Trump supporters who spoke to CNN in Bemidji said they simply do not trust the fact-checks that are deployed by Facebook. Facebook works with a number of organizations, including the Associated Press and Reuters, in the US to fact-check on its platform, all of which have signed up to a code of principles to be nonpartisan. One rally attendee, Mary Parsons, claimed her posts about the President were often removed by Facebook. While Parsons feels she is treated unfairly by Facebook’s fact-checkers, who she views as overly zealous, some Democrats think Facebook is not doing enough fact-checking. Either way, Parson says, the fact-checks do not sway her opinion.
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Obama urges voters to focus on down-ballot races to combat gerrymandering

The video represents the latest attempt by top Democrats to focus attention on down-ballot races, like those for state legislatures across the country. The party hopes that they can take control of a handful of state legislatures in November, wins that could be key because the state bodies elected in 2020 will play major roles…

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Obama urges voters to focus on down-ballot races to combat gerrymandering
The video represents the latest attempt by top Democrats to focus attention on down-ballot races, like those for state legislatures across the country. The party hopes that they can take control of a handful of state legislatures in November, wins that could be key because the state bodies elected in 2020 will play major roles in redrawing the congressional and legislative maps in 2021.

“You’ve heard a lot about the presidential race, maybe too much,” Obama says in a video for NowThis News, “but there is a lot more that will be on the ballot this fall.”

Obama adds: “In this election, the state leaders we elect will help redraw electoral districts all across the country.”

Obama is not new to the fight over redistricting and has focused a portion of his post-presidency work on the issue, including by folding his Organizing for Action group into the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, a group run by his former attorney general, Eric Holder, that looks to link Democratic issues with the need to take on gerrymandering.

“President Obama has said this is an all hands on deck moment, and one of the main drivers is redistricting that will happen based on November’s results,” Eric Schultz, an Obama adviser, said. “Now more than ever, we need to elect Democrats up and down the ballot. The Presidential campaign generally gets most of the attention, but President Obama believes these other races are mission-critical.”

The former president says in the video that he doesn’t think people “completely appreciate how much gerrymandering affects the outcome” of elections. The video then notes how Republicans swept into control in key states during the 2010 elections, allowing them to redraw maps in places like Georgia, Louisiana, Texas and Ohio.

Obama argues that many priorities of his presidency, including immigration reform and gun control measures, were thwarted, in part, because of gerrymandered districts electing Republicans to Congress.

“Those maps will stand for 10 years, that could mean a decade of fairly drawn districts where folks have an equal voice in their government, or it could mean a decade of unfair partisan gerrymandering,” Obama says in the video.

The video was made with NowThis News, a progressive mobile news outlet.

Democrats, emboldened by considerable excitement among their party’s key voters, hope they can flip at least one legislative body in Texas, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Arizona and Minnesota. And the party hopes it can make substantial inroads in states like Ohio, Wisconsin, Kansas, Georgia and Florida.

Groups like the National Democratic Redistricting Committee and Forward Majority, a super PAC that aims to pour millions into key state legislative races, have been leading the fight to focus Democratic attention to these races.

Forward Majority announced earlier this month that they would direct $15 million into state legislative races in Texas, Florida, North Carolina and Arizona, so-called Sun Belt states where Democrats believe President Donald Trump could lead voters to reject Republicans in November.

“Without having a seat at the table next year, we will likely see an unprecedented level of gerrymandering,” said Forward Majority co-founder Vicky Hausman, who argued that these four states “represent the most powerful points of leverage in our democracy.”

The is partly a newfound focus for Democrats on down-ballot races like state legislatures. Republicans spent millions to control the legislative bodies over the last decades, leading Democrats to lose control of several state legislatures during Obama’s presidency.

But Democratic groups have been making the case, like Obama does in the video, that these local officials wield notable power on everything from how a state responds to something like the coronavirus pandemic to how they deal with issues of police brutality.

“This year, educate yourself on the candidates at every level on your ballot,” Obama says. “They can make a profound impact on your community and our country.”

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