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Snowpiercer EP teases season 1 finale and a possible season 3

Snowpiercer showrunner Graeme Manson previews two-part season finale. Are trains really the most relaxing means of transport? Not judging by last week’s episode of TNT’s post-apocalyptic show Snowpiercer, which is set on a 1,001 carriage-long choo-choo. Jennifer Connelly’s hospitality chief Melanie Cavill revealed that the man supposedly in charge, Mr. Wilford, was actually left behind…

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Snowpiercer showrunner Graeme Manson previews two-part season finale.

Are trains really the most relaxing means of transport? Not judging by last week’s episode of TNT’s post-apocalyptic show Snowpiercer, which is set on a 1,001 carriage-long choo-choo. Jennifer Connelly’s hospitality chief Melanie Cavill revealed that the man supposedly in charge, Mr. Wilford, was actually left behind in Chicago seven years ago while the rebellion by the “tailies” resulted in a bloody battle with the forces of the titular train’s upper-class passengers. Showrunner Graeme Manson signals that Sunday’s two-part finale will be similarly incident-packed. “We’re really excited that it’s going to play back-to-back like that,” says Manson. “A lot, a lot happens. Rough track ahead!”

Will everybody get out of the finale alive?
“Of course not!” says Manson with a laugh. “We’ll just leave it at that.”

Fair enough. But while tonight’s episodes will be bad news for at least one character there is good news for fans of the show, whose cast also includes Daveed Diggs, Mickey Sumner, and Alison Wright. The bulk of season 2 was shot before the lockdown and Manson is hopeful that a third season will follow.

“I can just say that we’re in the beginning stages of figuring out how we’re going to pull the room together in this time,” he says, “and do it remotely with currently our writers separated between three or four cities in Canada and the States.”
The Snowpiercer two-part season finale premieres Sunday night on TNT at 9 p.m.
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OPINION | OPINION | Schools might be the best place to teach mask culture — and fight racism | CBC News

This is an opinion column by Amanda Kong, who is a secondary teacher in Metro Vancouver, B.C. For more information about CBC’s Opinion section, please see the FAQ. As a person of colour, I’m aware my mask-wearing face consciously and unconsciously triggers anxiety, fear, and discrimination. In the early days of the pandemic in March, I’d…

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This is an opinion column by Amanda Kong, who is a secondary teacher in Metro Vancouver, B.C. For more information about CBC’s Opinion section, please see the FAQ. As a person of colour, I’m aware my mask-wearing face consciously and unconsciously triggers anxiety, fear, and discrimination. In the early days of the pandemic in March, I’d noticepeople would step away when my mother and I would walk out with our masks on. That example of microaggression no longer happens with the same frequency anymore, as mask wearing has become more normalized and public health information around COVID-19 has evolved over time.  Wearing masks was initially discouraged to prevent the spread of COVID-19, with the caution that they can give the person wearing a mask a false sense of security, and lead to extra face touching to adjust the mask. Then, in April, the message began to shift, and by late May masks were recommended in situations where physical distancing couldn’t be maintained. More recently, a WHO study found that face masks are effective both in health care and community settings. Students in class at Bloomfield Elementary School in PEI show how classes have adjusted during the pandemic. Kong writes mask wearing is something that can be learned regardless of culture, and schools are the ideal place to promote this. (John Robertson/CBC) Even then, there remained this concern among the teaching community that wearing a mask might frighten students and hamper their ability to learn. Initially, very few teachers and students wore masks. Now, when I look at my Grade 12 science class this fall, the majority prefer to wear a mask in the classroom.  Doing an informal poll, many of them shared my perspective that even though masks alone cannot shield us, they are an important layer in indoor settings where it’s not possible to physically distance. We’ve already started talking about the science of wearing masks in class, and although it’s too soon to have heavy discussions about racism with my students this early on in the school year, it’s something I intend to work up to. I believe mask-wearing is something that can be learned regardless of culture, and schools are the ideal place to promote this. And we can look at Asia to see how it has been commonplace there. I reached out to friends and colleagues who live in Asia, and they graciously shared their experiences with me. After the SARS outbreak in 2003, masks became a symbol of reassurance and solidarity in many Asian countries. In Taiwan, students and teachers both wear face masks during classes. Some of the teachers I spoke with said they felt uncomfortable and frequently breathless when speaking through a mask, but over time the practice became habitual. They said that there were no limitations on the quality of teaching and learning. In Singapore, transparent face masks are used to teach students who rely on lip-reading.  Asian countries that were first hit by the pandemic have found different ways of navigating how to safely reopen schools. 2:12 Despite the inconvenience of masks, some teachers felt there should be a greater emphasis on curbing the community spread over personal preference. In Hong Kong, teachers and students also wear their masks throughout the day. Children as young as six have been able to use their face masks. They are taught verbal and visual cues to cultivate mask-wearing habits through spoken reinforcement and posters. Students are provided chin-breaks where they can take off their masks outdoors. Many teachers I spoke to did not understand the controversy behind mandatory masks as they see its benefits outweigh the risks. In contrast, there was noticeably greater cultural resistance to wearing masks in western culture. Perhaps western communication relies more on expressions, so masks are seen as an impediment to that. Perhaps SARS’ impact was far greater to sway public opinion in Asia, and that’s why the Asian community in Canada adopted mask wearing early on.  Those early efforts — which included self isolation and masks — to stop the spread of COVID-19 in B.C. appear to have paid off, despite some of its members being stigmatized because of the virus, say infectious disease doctors.  Data released by the province in June showed Richmond, B.C., the city with the highest concentration of Chinese residents in the province, as having the lowest percentage of cases on the Lower Mainland, where the bulk of B.C.’s cases resided. Masks might help protect others from the virus, but not racism.  If we normalize a mask-wearing culture in class — the way it has been done in Asian schools — and use that opportunity to teach science, tolerance and empathy, we can create a safer place for all. Do you have a strong opinion that could change how people think about an issue? A personal story that can educate or help others? We want to hear from you. CBC Vancouver is looking for British Columbians who want to write 500-600-word opinion and point of view pieces. Send us a pitch at [email protected] and we’ll be in touch. Read more opinion and point of view columns from British Columbians
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From TV Shows to Music Festivals: How Coronavirus Is Affecting Hollywood

The coronavirus outbreak has already had major implications on the well-being of humans, but as the U.S. and other countries around the world advise people to self-quarantine and institute travel bans, it’s also having a major impact on Hollywood. Several upcoming movies, including Mission: Impossible 7 and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s Red Notice, have paused…

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The coronavirus outbreak has already had major implications on the well-being of humans, but as the U.S. and other countries around the world advise people to self-quarantine and institute travel bans, it’s also having a major impact on Hollywood.
Several upcoming movies, including Mission: Impossible 7 and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s Red Notice, have paused production and sent casts and crews home. Films such as James Bond’s No Time to Die, Sonic the Hedgehog and Mulan have either postponed or canceled their China runs altogether. According to a February report from Business Insider, the outbreak could result in more than $1 billion of lost revenue for the film industry.
“There are so many moving parts and implications, not just for movie theaters but for public spaces in general,” Comscore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian told Business Insider on February 28. “The uncertainty is the one thing that is certain. At the end of the year, box-office numbers, particularly regarding China, are going to have an asterisk.”
The rapid spread of the virus has also resulted in the cancellation of music events and shut down production on several TV shows. Green Day and BTS are among the musical acts who have been forced to pushback tour dates in Asia. Talk shows initially filmed episodes without TV audiences, but have since opted to shut down for weeks. The Amazing Race pumped the brakes on its shoot, while filming of Clare Crawley’s season of The Bachelorette had also been paused.

As global safety regulations have lessened, the industry has begun the process of returning to semi-normalcy with caution. The Batman returned to set in London in September after closing up shop in March, but production shut down for the second time after star Robert Pattinson reportedly contracted coronavirus. Production started back up later that month.
Casts from Grey’s Anatomy, The Conners, Mom, Riverdale and Supernatural have also made their way back to set. Meanwhile, talk shows such as The Ellen DeGeneres Show and The Kelly Clarkson Show have utilized virtual audiences to make their return a bit smoother.
COVID-19 is an outbreak that stems from the coronavirus family, but the version that’s currently making rounds is unlike anything that’s previously been encountered. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the illness spreads primarily from person-to-person. Symptoms can include fever, cough and shortness of breath.
The illness originated in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, in December 2019 and has rapidly made its way across Asia. It has since spread across the world, with Italy, South Korea and Iran among the hardest hit. The World Health Organization declared coronavirus a pandemic on March 11, with director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus saying the situation will worsen.
“We expect to see the number of cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher,” he said.
As of September 30, more than 34 million people have been infected worldwide and the death toll has risen to over 1 million. In the U.S., more than seven million people have tested positive for the virus, which has killed at least 206,000.
Scroll down below to see a list of all the entertainment events that’s been impacted by the coronavirus.

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Covid-19: September worst month for pandemic in India

India is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country within weeks, surpassing the US, where more than 7.2m people have been infected. India has reported 86,821 new coronaviruses cases and another 1,181 fatalities, making September its worst month of the pandemic.The Health Ministry’s update raises India’s total to more than 6.3 million and 98,678 dead.…

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India is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country within weeks, surpassing the US, where more than 7.2m people have been infected.

India has reported 86,821 new coronaviruses cases and another 1,181 fatalities, making September its worst month of the pandemic.The Health Ministry’s update raises India’s total to more than 6.3 million and 98,678 dead. India added 41 per cent of its confirmed cases and 34 per cent of fatalities in September alone.

With a spike of 86,821 #coronavirus cases and 1,181 deaths in 24 hours, India’s tally on Thursday mounted to 63,12,584 cases.Out of the total cases, 9,40,705 are currently active, 52,73,201 have been discharged, while 98,678 lost the battle against the viral disease.#COVID19 pic.twitter.com/FvfU6194AS
– IANS Tweets (@ians_india) October 1, 2020

India is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country within weeks, surpassing the United States, where more than 7.2 million people have been infected.The government announced further easing of restrictions October 15. Cinemas, theaters and multiplexes can open with up to half of seating capacity, and swimming pools can also be used by athletes in training.The government also said India’s 28 states can decide on reopening of schools and coaching institutions gradually after October 15. However, the students will have the option of attending online classes.International commercial flights will remain suspended until October 31. However, evacuation flights will continue to and from the United States, Britain, Australia, Canada, France, Japan and several other countries.

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