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2020 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport review: Streamlined SUV skimps on sport – Roadshow

A nip and tuck to the Atlas’ profile gets you the more athletic looking Cross Sport model. Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow The Volkswagen Atlas is a big, three-row beast of an SUV with its wide body and horizontal design elements. The 2020 VW Atlas Cross Sport is only slightly less so. The new variant shrinks the SUV’s…

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2020 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport review: Streamlined SUV skimps on sport     – Roadshow

A nip and tuck to the Atlas’ profile gets you the more athletic looking Cross Sport model.
Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow
The Volkswagen Atlas is a big, three-row beast of an SUV with its wide body and horizontal design elements. The 2020 VW Atlas Cross Sport is only slightly less so. The new variant shrinks the SUV’s body slightly and tweaks the roofline for a sportier profile and more athletic curb appeal, allowing it to better do battle with the new Passport — itself a scaled-down version of the Atlas’ closest nemesis, the Honda Pilot.

LikeNew profile looks better, doesn’t cost much spaceEven basic cabin tech checks all the right boxesComfortable ride over rough surfaces

Don’t LikeFuel economy is just OKLots of body movement at higher speeds

The Cross Sport lowers the Atlas’ roofline to 67.8 inches (down 2.3) and shortens the SUV’s overall length to 195.5 inches (5.2 less). The result, along with a bit of a nipping and tucking of the profile, is a much more muscular and athletic take on the standard Atlas’ stiff, brick-like aesthetic.The slightly shorter length visually pushes the rear wheels out to the vehicle’s corners, giving the Cross Sport a more aggressive-looking stance, while the lower roofline and exaggerated wheel arches make the Atlas appear lower and leaner. Personally, I think the Cross Sport looks the way the Atlas should have all along.

Sculpting its sheetmetal saves this Atlas variant about 200 pounds, depending on the trim level, but the more svelte shape doesn’t help as much with aerodynamics and efficiency as I’d hoped. The Cross Sport still has the same 0.34 drag coefficient as its more squared-off sibling and largely the same fuel efficiency across the spectrum of engine options. At best, I’m talking 21 miles per gallon city, 24 mpg highway and 22 mpg combined for the front-wheel-drive four-cylinder. At the other end of the spectrum is the all-wheel-drive V6, at 16 mpg city, 22 mpg highway and 19 mpg combined.The underpinnings haven’t changed. The Cross Sport sits on the same 117.3-inch wheelbase with 8 inches of ground clearance and retains its wide boi status at 78.4 inches across. I’ve always thought it weird that the Atlas classifies as a midsize SUV despite its imposing curbside stature.

The Cross Sport V6 4Matic gains one combined mpg despite unchanged city and highway estimates, so there must be some small aerodynamic advantage being rounded off.
Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow
Of course, the tidier exterior design costs the Cross Sport a bit of interior volume, but not as much practical space as you might think. By the numbers, there’s 40.3 cubic feet behind the second row and 77.8 cubic feet with the seats folded flat. That’s a loss of 15.2 and 19 cubes, respectively, compared to the larger Atlas, but it’s all lost space near the ceiling. The Cross Sport still does a fantastic job swallowing up bulky items — including a 52-inch wide entertainment center — with room to spare.

Taller drivers and passengers may notice the loss of about 2 inches of headroom on both of the Cross Sport’s rows (39.4 inches front, 37.8 inches rear) and there’s no missing the lack of a third row option. There’s just no room for it in the Cross Sport’s shorter chassis. Soft ride, relaxed performanceThe Cross Sport looks more athletic, but it’s no more agile than before. The SUV’s ride is just as soft as the standard model and just as comfort-focused. Despite the reduced curb weight, the Cross Sport feels big with numb steering that lacks much of the car-like nimbleness of its competitors around town.On the highway, the Atlas’ vague steering and soft suspension makes the SUV feel almost truck-ish. I constantly have to make small steering corrections to make up for bumps, dips or crosswinds nudging the Cross Sport to and fro. There’s a lot of vertical and lateral body movement at speed over my local (and very uneven) highways, meaning the SUV never really feels settled. It isn’t so fiddly as to feel unsafe or scary, but the Atlas requires just a bit more mental energy to keep centered within its lane than, say, our long-term Honda Passport — that’s not exactly what I mean when I say I want an engaging drive.With such a wide body, there often isn’t much wiggle room between the lane markers.
Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow
Two engines are available to Atlas Cross Sport buyers: a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder and a 3.6-liter V6, each mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission. Either can be had in front-wheel drive configuration or, optionally, Volkswagen’s 4Matic all-wheel-drive system.My example’s V6 engine brings 276 horsepower and 266 pound-feet of torque to the party. Compared to the 2.0T, it’s got 41 extra ponies, but only 8 more pound-feet. In practice, the V6 doesn’t feel that much more potent on the road than the I4, possibly due in part to the automatic transmission’s comfort-tuned programming somewhat dulling responsiveness in favor of smoothness and economy.Tech and safetyThe Cross Sport features an identical list of standard and optional driver aid tech as the larger Atlas. There’s a good loadout of features including adaptive cruise control that works well in stop-and-go traffic, automatic emergency brake assist, pedestrian detection, blind-spot monitoring and automatic high beams. My example also features lane-keeping assist and lane-departure alerts that are unobtrusive and helpful. However, it doesn’t do as good a job holding the center line as Honda’s lane-keeping tech or Toyota’s now-standard Lane Tracing Assist, leaving the Atlas wandering somewhat between the markers.The Atlas’ standard 8-inch display is home to smartphone connectivity and a refreshingly simple interface.
Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow
VW’s cabin tech is still among the best in the class, mostly because of its smartly chosen features and relative simplicity. There’s not much to the menu structure, so it never really gets awkward.My example’s upgraded 8-inch display plays host to standard Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity, and is nicely positioned just a short reach from the driver’s seat. The optional navigation software gets me where I need to go without issue and works well with the voice recognition that Volkswagen’s running these days. If you’re feeling deja-vu from my previous Atlas review, that’s because this is the same setup you’ll find in the dashboards of nearly every new VW in the automaker’s lineup, and that’s not a bad thing.Only the top-level SEL trim offers VW’s Digital Cockpit instrument cluster, which is a shame. The full-screen instrument cluster looks great. It’s not as flashy or powerful as Audi’s Virtual Cockpit digital dashboard, but VW’s setup is still very customizable and worth considering.
2020 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport: Slightly smaller, much better looking
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Competition and priceThe 2020 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport starts at $31,565 for the base 2.0T S model, including a $1,020 destination charge — that’s exactly a $1,000 savings over the larger, three-row model — and tops out at the $50,815 V6 SEL Premium R-Line with 4Motion all-wheel drive. The mid-tier SE trim is the sweet spot, getting you most of the creature comforts and safety tech, priced reasonably between $34,965 and the $43,260 as-tested price of this V6 SE with Technology, R-Line and 4Motion upgrades, as well as premium Aurora Red Chroma Metallic paint and a panoramic sunroof.The Atlas Cross Sport rides comfortably, boasts a solid mix of features and tech and retains much of the standard Atlas’ spacious cargo and passenger capacity despite its more svelte shape. It’s also surprising just how much better the reshaped rear end looks. However, the Atlas Cross Sport isn’t my favorite ride in this class. I’d like a tighter ride to go with the Cross Sporty looks — or at least the option for a sportier R-Line suspension to go with the badges and bumpers. For now, the Atlas Cross Sport’s primary competition is the Honda Passport which gets the nod from me thanks to its comparably robust tech and more car-like handling. It’s just more pleasant and less mentally taxing to drive. Toyota’s upcoming Venza will also prove to be an interesting cross-shop, depending on where the dedicated hybrid model’s price and efficiency lands.

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2021 Mazda6 review: G’bye, gorgeous – Roadshow

After all this time, the Mazda6 still looks great. Kyle Hyatt/Roadshow The venerable sedan used to be the default choice for most new car buyers. Every company made some, and they were just about guaranteed to outsell anything other than pickup trucks. Times have certainly changed, however, and compact and midsize sedans are dropping like…

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2021 Mazda6 review: G’bye, gorgeous     – Roadshow

After all this time, the Mazda6 still looks great.
Kyle Hyatt/Roadshow
The venerable sedan used to be the default choice for most new car buyers. Every company made some, and they were just about guaranteed to outsell anything other than pickup trucks. Times have certainly changed, however, and compact and midsize sedans are dropping like flies as automakers shift their focus to crossovers and SUVs. Mazda just confirmed the fashionable Mazda6 won’t live to see 2022, and following a drive in the 2021 Carbon Edition, I can tell you this sedan’s demise hurts more than most.

LikeGreat turbo engineExcellent ride qualityLuxurious interiorGorgeous exterior

Don’t LikeAntiquated techMediocre fuel economy

Arguably the best thing about the Mazda6 is how it drives. It’s currently available with two engines: a 2.5-liter I4 with 187 horsepower and 186 pound-feet of torque, and the uplevel 2.5-liter turbo I4 found in my test car, with a healthy 250 hp and a borderline-silly 320 lb-ft. Both engines are paired with a somewhat archaic six-speed automatic transmission, driving the front wheels exclusively.On the road, the six-speed auto is largely ignorable — and I mean that as a compliment. The transmission shifts smoothly and imperceptibly, though with only six forward gears, fuel economy isn’t exactly outstanding. The EPA rates the 2021 Mazda6 2.5T at 23 mpg city, 29 mpg highway and 26 mpg combined, but at least I’m able to match those estimates without issue.

As is the case with most Mazdas, the 6’s goodness isn’t about its power, it’s how it feels on the road. The Mazda6 is fun to drive on a curvy road but also very comfortable and compliant even on terribly maintained Los Angeles streets. The steering is quick and perfectly weighted, and there’s a sense of lightness to the chassis. If I have one criticism, it’s that the engine’s healthy torque often overwhelms the stock all-season tires, making unintentional chirps a fairly regular occurrence.When the Mazda6 was refreshed for the 2018 model year, one key focus was to make the interior look and feel more luxurious and upscale. This was largely successful, as the 2021 Mazda6 uses some excellent materials and the overall cabin design is clean and modern. This sedan has arguably one of the most elegant and understated interiors to come out of Japan in a while. The high-quality leather and solid-feeling plastics go a long way toward accomplishing Mazda’s goal. The tall gear lever and mostly analog instrument panel feel a little old compared with what’s in more modern competitors, but they’re perfectly functional and easy to use.

An upscale interior is a highlight of the Mazda6.
Kyle Hyatt/Roadshow
Mazda has always lagged behind rivals like Honda and Toyota when it comes to infotainment technology, and that’s evident in the 6. The 8-inch touchscreen atop the dash is bright and easy to read. The standard Mazda Connect software is pretty antiquated, and Mazda’s insistence on locking out the touchscreen while you’re moving is super annoying, especially if you need to do something that can’t be controlled with voice commands. Thankfully, the 6 has wireless Apple CarPlay and wired Android Auto integration, so maybe just rely on your smartphone’s tech for infotainment duties.

When it comes to safety tech, the Mazda6 offers a suite of driver assistance systems on par with the rest of the class. Things like automatic emergency braking, lane-keep assist, automatic high beams, blind-spot monitoring with cross-traffic alert and adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability are all standard on my loaded Carbon Edition tester. Are any of these features class-leading? No. But they’re all things I’d expect to see at this price.Where the Mazda6 continues to lead the midsize sedan class is in exterior design. Sleek and sophisticated, this is an incredibly pretty car, even when stacked up against fresh competition like the Hyundai Sonata and the Kia K5. But once you dig a little deeper, the Mazda6’s old bones just can’t keep it relevant against hot newcomers, even with its powerful turbo engine. The Honda Accord 2.0T is better than it’s ever been, and the Hyundai Sonata N Line is freaking brilliant.One of the good ones, right here.
Kyle Hyatt/Roadshow
The 2021 Mazda6 Carbon Edition comes with all the bells and whistles, with no options apart from $500 parking sensors and $400 embedded navigation. My tester retails for $34,845, including Mazda’s $995 destination fee, which isn’t unreasonable but is still slightly more than the sporty Sonata N Line, which has a better drivetrain, newer tech and a more comprehensive warranty — though the Mazda’s looks are likely less polarizing.Of course, even the less expensive trims have plenty of appeal. The base Mazda6 Sport trim with its nonturbocharged engine retails for just $25,470, including destination. The turbo engine becomes available on the Grand Touring model, which starts at $31,170. The top-tier Signature, with its wood and ultrasuede interior trim, will set you back $36,895. Basically, there’s a Mazda6 for most budgets and the inherently great chassis is standard on all of them.All told, the 6 continues to show off the things Mazda does best: great handling, nice interiors and stellar looks. The Mazda6 might not present as strong a case as it once did, but it’s still a favorite among enthusiasts. I’ll be very sad to see this driver-oriented sedan go.

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Toshiba Amazon Fire TV C350 series review: Alexa, what’s on? – CNET

The C350 series from Toshiba gives big-screen, physical form to Amazon’s Fire TV streaming system. From the fonts to the colors, if you’ve interacted with any Fire TV stick or other Amazon TV device, you’ll be fully familiar with this television. As you’d expect, it leans hard into Alexa and has full Amazon Prime Video integration, but…

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Toshiba Amazon Fire TV C350 series review: Alexa, what’s on?     – CNET

The C350 series from Toshiba gives big-screen, physical form to Amazon’s Fire TV streaming system. From the fonts to the colors, if you’ve interacted with any Fire TV stick or other Amazon TV device, you’ll be fully familiar with this television. As you’d expect, it leans hard into Alexa and has full Amazon Prime Video integration, but it also has other streaming services like Netflix, Disney Plus, HBO Max and more. 

LikeAlexa powers superior voice featuresVoice remote included

Don’t LikeSmart TV menus lag behind RokuOvert focus on Amazon services

Picture quality on the C350 was fine for a budget TV, if a little worse than the competition. In my side-by-side comparisons its color and contrast couldn’t quite match the TCL 4-Series and Vizio V-Series, but at this price the image quality differences probably don’t matter that much. Arguably more important is the smart TV, and while Alexa beats Roku and Vizio for voice control, we like Roku’s simpler, more agnostic smart TV approach better. It’s also annoying that some non-Amazon services, like Vudu, get short shrift, while others, namely Peacock, aren’t available at all.Right now the C350 also costs more than either of those competitors from TCL and Vizio, but with Prime Day fast approaching, we wouldn’t be surprised to see a big price drop. Until that happens, however, we can only truly recommend it for someone who fully embraces the Bezos bonanza and wants their TV to be a part of that. 

Read more: Early Prime Day TV deals: Save on models from Insignia, LG, TCL, Toshiba and VizioThe Toshiba C350 series is available in 43-, 50- and 55-inch versions, with larger 65- and 75-inch sizes coming soon. I reviewed the 50-inch model.

Prime features and connectionsLike other TVs at this price the C530 is a basic 4K HDR model — no fancy extras like next-gen gaming perks, local dimming, wide color gamut or tons of light here. Its Fire TV functionality is the major feature here and the menus have what Amazon calls a content-forward design: lots of thumbnails for TV shows and movies as opposed to tiles like Roku. Many focus on Amazon’s Prime Video library, but you can download apps for other major streaming services, which unpack rows of their thumbnails.

Geoffrey Morrison/CNET
I liked the Toshiba’s remote better than the TCL’s because it features Alexa voice as well as Bluetooth, so you don’t have to aim it at the TV. The button layout is simple and clean, if not quite as sparse as Roku, and includes prominent white shortcut keys to various services. The C350 basically ties the Roku in most user-friendly setup screens. It has the added bonus that if you’re an Amazon Prime member (and I assume you are if you’re considering this TV), once you go through the initial setup you’ve already logged in and are ready to watch shows and movies.Fire TV’s setup menus are simple and straightforward.
Geoffrey Morrison/CNET
One frustrating design decision is that the picture settings menu covers one-third of the screen, and shadows about half. This menu doesn’t disappear or shrink when you make adjustments either. Now, you would think this would only be a problem if you’re a TV reviewer like me using test patterns (don’t get me wrong, it absolutely is), but it also makes it harder if you’re trying to eyeball the correct setting at home. That’s because the majority of the screen is not what the screen will look like once you exit the menus. Probably not a huge deal for most buyers, to be fair, but it’s a bummer if you like to get a TV looking as good as possible.Read more: Stop watching bad TV picture settings: 9 ways to optimize your big screenThose picture big adjustment menus can mess with your tweaks. 
Geoffrey Morrison/CNET
Energy Star rating for the 50-inch model is $21 a year, which is mid-pack for this range of TVs.Some TVs in this price range have three HDMI inputs, and it certainly isn’t a bad thing that the C350 has four. It even has analog video and audio inputs. So if you have an old gaming console or any retro A/V gear, you’re in luck. If you decide you want to go your own streaming route and eschew Fire TV, you won’t be able to power most streaming sticks from the TV’s USB connections. Not a huge deal: It just means you’ll need to run power separately to the stick.HDMI inputs: fourComposite analog inputUSB ports: two (0.5A power)Internet: Wi-Fi, WiredAntenna inputAnalog audio output (3.5mm)Optical digital audio outputSpeakers: two downward-firing
Geoffrey Morrison/CNET
Alexa, what’s Vudu?The voice search works well. It directs you to Amazon in most cases, but it does give you some alternate options. For example, if you say “Thor Ragnarok” it will bring up a screen with that and some related content, and if you select the movie out of those choices you have the option to buy or rent on Amazon — or watch it on Disney Plus. Another click brings up additional places to watch. However, it doesn’t show all options like Roku or Vizio would. It doesn’t show you Vudu, for example. It’s actually worth focusing on Vudu as an example of the limitations forced on this Toshiba, presumably by Amazon. There is, technically, a Vudu app. So at first glance in a store or on a checklist, it seems to have more options to buy or rent content than just Amazon. The truth, however, is that it’s an ancient version of the Vudu app that has an archaic interface and only allows you to watch SD content. You read that correctly: not even HD, and forget about 4K. And that’s for content you already own. You can’t buy anything in the Vudu app. You have to go to Vudu’s website to buy it. With TCL/Roku, Vizio and Samsung, you can buy directly in the app. So you should absolutely consider this TV not just “primarily” an Amazon device, but an Amazon device that might lock you out of non-Amazon stuff. 
Geoffrey Morrison/CNET
It’s also worth repeating that Fire TV, and by extension this TV, is the only major streaming platform to lack an app for Peacock. Subscribers can try side-loading if they’re adventurous, but our advice is to get a different TV if Peacock is important to you.Picture quality comparisonsThe TCL 4-Series and Vizio V-series are direct competitors of the Toshiba C530, with similar features and prices, so they make ideal comparison models. I connected them via a Monoprice 1×4 distribution amplifier and viewed them side-by-side-by-side watching a mix of HD, 4K and 4K HDR content.The Vizio and the TCL look very similar. The Toshiba is in one way better and most other ways slightly worse. It’s significantly brighter than either, nearing the much more-expensive Samsung Q60A with non-HDR content (although with HDR content the Samsung is far brighter). None of these TVs are dim, of course, but if you have an extremely bright room and need all the light you can get from your TV, the Toshiba has an advantage.That said, with test patterns it was readily apparent that the C350 only achieved its peak brightness for a few seconds, then immediately dimmed. With actual content, this wasn’t readily noticeable. It did this regardless of settings, so it’s possible it was still doing it with actual content, just not as much or as noticeably as with test patterns. In other aspects of picture quality, the C350 isn’t as good as the other two. Not significantly, but when viewing them all at the same time, enough that you could see it. The color is a little less accurate, a little less lifelike. The contrast is a little less punchy. It wasn’t bad, but when I’d slide across the couch to view either the TCL or Vizio (all have mediocre off-axis picture quality), those two just looked a little better.Prime real estate?Anyone looking for a budget TV has some excellent options all for very little money. The TCL 4-Series is probably the best choice for most people, especially those who don’t know their contrast from their composite. It’s easy to use thanks to its Roku interface, and has access to all the major streaming services. The Vizio V-Series is nearly as good, with more picture setting options and a more lively interface. Which leaves the C350. If you buy everything through Amazon, including renting movies and buying TV shows, then it’s probably fine. But the limitations imposed by Fire TV might be frustrating in the long run. A more budget-agnostic TV, like the TCL/Roku or the Vizio, allow you to get content any way you want (mostly), without funneling or limiting you to Amazon’s ecosystem. It’s sort of like a car that only drives on certain roads. If you only drive on those roads, that’s fine. But if you want to take a new shortcut to work, you’re out of luck. If someone’s not very tech-savvy and has gotten used to Fire TV specifically, or Alexa generally, then this might be a good choice because it’s very much an Amazon product, despite the name on the bottom. For everyone else, however, I’d recommend the TCL or Vizio first.

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Huawei Chairman Urges US to Reconsider ‘Attack’ on Global Supply Chain

Chinese telecom giant Huawei said on Wednesday its supply chain was under attack from the United States and called on Washington to reconsider its trade restrictions which were hurting suppliers globally.The world’s biggest maker of mobile telecommunications equipment and smartphones is under pressure from US trade curbs designed to choke Huawei’s access to commercially available…

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Huawei Chairman Urges US to Reconsider ‘Attack’ on Global Supply Chain

Chinese telecom giant Huawei said on Wednesday its supply chain was under attack from the United States and called on Washington to reconsider its trade restrictions which were hurting suppliers globally.The world’s biggest maker of mobile telecommunications equipment and smartphones is under pressure from US trade curbs designed to choke Huawei’s access to commercially available chips.”The US has modified their sanctions for the third time and that has indeed brought great challenges to our production and operations,” Huawei Chairman Guo Ping told reporters in Shanghai.Washington says Huawei is a vehicle for Chinese state espionage and from September 15 imposed new curbs barring US companies from supplying or servicing the company. Huawei has repeatedly denied being a national security risk.Guo said that although Huawei had sufficient chips for its business-to-business operations, including its 5G network enterprise, it was feeling the pinch of the US restrictions on its smartphone chip stocks.It understood that suppliers such as Qualcomm were applying for US licences which would allow them to continue serving Huawei, he added.Intel has already received licences to supply certain products to Huawei, while China’s Semiconductor Manufacturing, which uses US-origin machinery to produce chips for Huawei, has applied for a licence, Reuters has previously reported.Huawei was willing to use Qualcomm chips in its smartphones should Qualcomm get a licence to sidestep the restrictions, Guo added. Qualcomm did not immediately respond to a request for comment.”We hope the US government can reconsider its policy and if the US government allows it we are still willing to buy products from US companies,” Guo said on the sidelines of its annual Huawei Connect conference.Huawei has said that from September 15 it would stop manufacturing its most advanced chips under its Kirin line which power its high-end phones. Analysts expect its existing supply of Kirin chips will run out next year.Consumers have rushed to buy Huawei phones amid concerns its mobile division is about to fold. Vendors say that prices have spiked by as much as CNY 500 (roughly Rs. 5,400) for some devices.Washington has shown little sign that it is willing to back down from its fight with Huawei, which comes at a time when relations between the United States and China are at their worst in decades.The United States said last month it would expand a programme it called “Clean Network” to prevent various Chinese apps and telecoms companies from accessing sensitive information on American citizens and businesses.David Wang, a Huawei executive director, said the company hoped that countries would introduce “rational standards” for 5G. Huawei had yet to see any adverse impact on its global 5G business from the US programme, he added.© Thomson Reuters 2020Are Apple Watch SE, iPad 8th Gen the Perfect ‘Affordable’ Products for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

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