World's E-Waste 'Unsustainable', Says UN Report Citing China, India, and US - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
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World’s E-Waste ‘Unsustainable’, Says UN Report Citing China, India, and US

Across the river from Delhi’s Red Fort, the grim neighbourhood of Seelampur lives off what consumers in the modern world throw away – their broken or obsolete electronic and electrical goods.Home to one of the world’s largest markets for e-waste, Seelampur exemplifies the challenge highlighted in a UN-led report released on Thursday.The Global E-waste Monitor…

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Across the river from Delhi’s Red Fort, the grim neighbourhood of Seelampur lives off what consumers in the modern world throw away – their broken or obsolete electronic and electrical goods.Home to one of the world’s largest markets for e-waste, Seelampur exemplifies the challenge highlighted in a UN-led report released on Thursday.The Global E-waste Monitor 2020 report found that the world dumped a record 53.6 million tonnes of e-waste last year. Just 17.4 percent was recycled.”Even countries with a formal e-waste management system in place are confronted with relatively low collection and recycling rates,” the report said.China, with 10.1 million tonnes, was the biggest contributor to e-waste, and the United States was second with 6.9 million tonnes. India, with 3.2 million tonnes, was third. Together these three countries accounted for nearly 38 percent of the world’s e-waste last year.While the overall damage done to the environment from all the un-recycled waste may be incalculable, the message from the report was conclusive: “The way in which we produce, consume, and dispose of e-waste is unsustainable.”Global warming is just one issue cited by the report as it noted 98 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents were released into the atmosphere as a result of inadequate recycling of “undocumented” refrigerators and air conditioners.This year’s coronavirus lockdowns have exacerbated the e-waste problem.People stuck at home are de-cluttering, and because of the lockdowns there are few workers collecting and recycling the junk, Kees Balde, a senior programme officer with the sustainable cycles programme at the United Nations University, another contributor to the report, told Reuters.New consumers, more junkWhat is happening in India and China is symptomatic of a wider problem in developing countries, where demand for goods like washing machines, refrigerators, and air conditioners is rising rapidly.”In middle- and low-income countries, the e-waste management infrastructure is not yet fully developed or, in some cases, is entirely absent,” the report said.Dinesh Raj Bandela, deputy programme manager at the Centre for Science and Environment, a New Delhi-based research and advocacy body, said India’s focus on e-waste had to go beyond collection, and manufacturers should be encouraged to produce consumer goods that last longer and are less toxic.Although India is the only country in South Asia to draft legislation for e-waste, its collection remains rudimentary.In Seelampur, the maze of filthy lanes are filled with scrap shops where thousands of people work, picking apart whatever is salvageable from the junk gathered from across north India.Outside each shop there are piles of old monitor screens, desktop computers, broken landline telephones, mobile handsets, televisions, voltage stabilisers, air-cons, refrigerators, microwaves, vacuum cleaners, and washing machines.Vines of old electric cable are strewn or rolled over the mountains of electronic trash.Shopkeepers and workers are extremely suspicious of any outsider walking through the narrow lanes, especially journalists. Mohammed Abid, a scrap e-waste dealer, who was willing to speak, denied that ways of handling e-waste in Seelampur broke any laws or posed any dangers.“There are certain jobs that create a lot of problem for the environment, but in this market no such work is done that affects the environment or increases the pollution – nothing of that sort is done here,” he said, while the stench from a nearby open drain filled the air.© Thomson Reuters 2020

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Lenovo Legion 7i, Legion 5i, Legion 5i Pro Gaming Laptops Refreshed With 11th Gen Intel Core H-Series CPUs

Lenovo Legion 7i, Legion 5i, and Legion 5i Pro gaming laptops have been announced with the latest 11th Gen Intel Core H-series mobile processors. The Lenovo announcement comes at the heel of Intel’s 11th Gen Core Tiger Lake-H processors for laptops and brings three updated laptops models, along with a new gaming monitor. They come…

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Lenovo Legion 7i, Legion 5i, and Legion 5i Pro gaming laptops have been announced with the latest 11th Gen Intel Core H-series mobile processors. The Lenovo announcement comes at the heel of Intel’s 11th Gen Core Tiger Lake-H processors for laptops and brings three updated laptops models, along with a new gaming monitor. They come with Windows 10, Thunderbolt 4 support, and Wi-Fi 6 connectivity. The refreshed Lenovo Legion gaming laptops are powered by Nvidia GeForce RTX laptop GPUs including the latest Nvidia GeForce RTX 3050 Ti and GeForce RTX 3050.Lenovo Legion 7i, Legion 5i, Legion 5i Pro laptop, Lenovo Legion Y25g-30 monitor: Price, availabilityLenovo Legion 7i (Storm Grey) starts at $1,769.99 (roughly Rs. 1.30 lakh) and the Lenovo Legion 5i Pro (Stingray White, Storm Grey) starts at $1,329.99 (roughly Rs. 97,700). Both of these models will be available from June this year. Lenovo Legion 5i (Phantom Blue, Stingray White) starts at $969.99 (roughly Rs. 71,300) and will be available from July. Lenovo Legion Y25g-30 gaming monitor starts at $699.99 (roughly Rs. 51,400) and will be available from October this year.As of now, Lenovo has not shared international availability for the new Legion laptops or the gaming monitor.Lenovo Legion 7i specificationsLenovo Legion 7i runs up to Windows 10 Pro and features a 16-inch WQXGA (2,560×1,600 pixels) IPS display with a 165Hz refresh rate, 3ms response time, 100 percent sRGB coverage, and 16:10 aspect ratio. It boast of 500 nits peak brightness, up to VESA DisplayHDR 400 certification, Dolby Vision support, and Nvidia G-Sync support. Under the hood, it can be equipped with up to an 11th Generation Intel Core i9-11980HK processor and up to an Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 laptop GPU with 16GB GDDR6 VRAM that has 165W maximum power. Lenovo Legion 7i comes with up to 32GB of DDR4 RAM clocked at 3,200MHz and up to 2TB PCIe SSD storage.Audio is handled by two 2W super linear speaker system and smart amp with Nahimic Audio. For connectivity, you get two Thunderbolt 4 ports, a 3.5mm audio jack, a USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-C port, three USB Type-A 3.2 Gen 1 ports, an HDMI 2.1 port, and an Ethernet jack. Lenovo Legion 7i is also features Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth v5.1. Lenovo says the battery can last up to eight hours and the gaming laptop weighs 2.5kg.Lenovo Legion 5i, Legion 5i Pro: SpecificationsLenovo Legion 5i is offered in a 15.6-inch and a 17-inch display model while the Legion 5i Pro comes in a 16-inch size. All three models come with up to Windows 10 Pro. The 15.6-inch Legion 5i can be equipped with up to a WQHD (2,560×1440 pixels) IPS display with a 165Hz refresh rate, 3ms response time, 100 percent sRGB coverage, 300 nits peak brightness, Dolby Vision support, and Nvidia G-Sync support. The 17-inch model has up to a full-HD (1,920×1,080 pixels) IPS display with 144Hz refresh rate, and 72 percent NTSC coverage.On the other hand, the Legion 5i Pro comes with a 16-inch WQXGA (2,560×1,600 pixels) IPS display with a 165Hz refresh rate, 500 nits peak brightness, up to VESA DisplayHDR 400 certification, Low Blue Light – TUV certification, and 16:10 aspect ratio.The three models can be fitted with up to an 11th Generation Intel Core i7-11800H CPU and up to Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 laptop GPU with 8GB GDDR6 VRAM. The maximum power output of the GPU depends with each model. The Lenovo Legion 5i and the Legion 5i Pro come with up to 32GB while the 17-inch Legion 5i comes with up to 16GB of DDR4 RAM clocked at 3,200MHz. For storage, the 15.6-inch model gets up to 2TB of M.2 NVMe PCIe SSD while the other two get up to 1TB PCIe SSD Gen 4 storage.They all have a claimed battery life of up to eight hours. Connectivity options on all three models are the same as the Lenovo Legion 7i but the 17-inch Legion 5i gets a card reader as well. Audio is handled by two 2W speakers.Lenovo Legion Y25g-30 gaming monitor specificationsThe 24.5-inch Legion Y25g-30 gaming monitor comes with full-HD (1,920×1,080 pixels) display that has 16:9 aspect ratio, a 360Hz refresh rate, 400 nits peak brightness, and 1ms response time. It covered over 99 percent sRGB and has 1,000:1 typical contrast ratio. It supports Nvidia G-Sync and Nvidia Reflex as well. For connectivity, the Legion Y25g-30 comes with a USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-B port, three USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A ports, a USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-C port, two HDMI 2.0 ports, and a DisplayPort 1.4 port. There is a 3.5mm audio jack as well.Is Mi 11X the best phone under Rs. 35,000? We discussed this on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast. Later (starting at 23:50), we jump over to the Marvel series The Falcon and the Winter Soldier. Orbital is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music and wherever you get your podcasts.

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Lorde Is Crowned on The 1,000,000,000 List For ‘Royals’

Since her breakthrough with “Royals,” Lorde (real name Ella Yellich-O’Connor) has won just about every award going. “Royals” ruled the Billboard Hot 100 for nine weeks, won two Grammy Awards (for song of the year and best pop solo performance) and, in 2018, was certified diamond by the RIAA.Lorde was presented with her latest award…

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Since her breakthrough with “Royals,” Lorde (real name Ella Yellich-O’Connor) has won just about every award going. “Royals” ruled the Billboard Hot 100 for nine weeks, won two Grammy Awards (for song of the year and best pop solo performance) and, in 2018, was certified diamond by the RIAA.Lorde was presented with her latest award at the APRA AMCOS NZ offices in her hometown by CEO Dean Ormston and Anthony Healey, head of APRA AMCOS NZ operations, and her publisher, Kobalt Music Publishing, received an award for the song’s milestone.She’s one of four New Zealand songwriters officially added to The 1,000,000,000 List in recent days.Joel Little bagged his fourth 1,000,000,000 List award, this time for Taylor Swift’s hit “ME!,” from her hit Lover album.Little, the in-demand songwriter and producer, has already snagged honors for “Young Dumb & Broke” by Khalid, “Whatever It Takes” by Imagine Dragons and Lorde’s “Royals”.Little’s collaboration with Swift was the product of a fortuitous moment backstage at a Broods concert, where the Kiwi’s manager approached Swift’s team with a proposal. They were both due to be in New Zealand at the same time, so a collaborative plan was hatched.The pair caught up at Little’s Titirangi studio while Swift’s Reputation stadium tour passed through. They hit it off, and Little later visited Swift in New York, where they began shaping the songs that would feature on 2019’s Lover.Also, New Zealand songwriters Leroy Clampitt and Los Angeles-based James Wong were presented with their Billions Award for Justin Bieber’s “Company” (from 2015’s Purpose), co-written by international writers Andreas Shuller, Justin Bieber, James Abrahart, Thomas Troelsen and Jason “Poo Bear” Boyd.The 1,000,000,000 List is said to be the first award of its kind to acknowledge a songwriter’s achievement. Past recipients include Kevin Parker (for Tame Impala’s “The Less I Know The Better”), Dean Lewis and Jon Hume (for “Be Alright”), Flume (for “Never Be Like You”), Starley and P-Money (for “Call On Me”), Vance Joy (for “Riptide”), Gotye (for “Somebody That I Used to Know”), and Vassy (for “Bad”). See the full list here.

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Marines eye tactical resupply drone prototypes

Just like Amazon wants to use drones to drop off packages on your doorstep, the Marines want to use UAS systems for tactical resupply to squads in the field. Military Times’ Todd South looks goes to Periscope Aviation’s headquarters for a look at where heavy-lift drone technology is headed. The Marines are one step closer…

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Just like Amazon wants to use drones to drop off packages on your doorstep, the Marines want to use UAS systems for tactical resupply to squads in the field. Military Times’ Todd South looks goes to Periscope Aviation’s headquarters for a look at where heavy-lift drone technology is headed. The Marines are one step closer to finding ways to transport vital supplies to Marines on the move via drones. In 2020, the Corps sought prototype drones that would be able to carry a 60 pound payload on a 20 km roundtrip. After evaluations at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona, the Corps picked Periscope Aviation and Malloy Aeronautics to build competing drones under the Tactical Resupply Unmanned Aircraft System program. The program is basically the Marines Corps’ way of seeing what’s available from industry for smaller payload, shorter range resupply that could be scaled up quickly for larger payloads at farther distances with the right technology investment. Marine Corps Times recently visited the Leesburg, Virginia, headquarters of Periscope Aviation to view a demonstration of their prototype and talk with Periscope CEO Nick McCarter. play_circle_filled Since the 2020 selection, the competitors have delivered an advanced version of the original model. Periscope’s MK4-R was its 2020 submission. Get the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup Don’t miss the top Marine Corps stories, delivered each afternoon (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup. “From there, the Marine Corps wanted to lift more weight, so we developed the MK4-RX,” McCarter said. In early 2021, the company delivered the MK4-RX prototype, which can carry 60 pounds on a 40 km roundtrip and 90 pounds on a 20 km roundtrip. Company officials noted they’ve done test lifts with the drone up to 135 pounds and fly a 20 km round trip. McCarter explained that part of the way they’re able to do that work is through a series of patents on their more streamlined design that allows the drone to travel through the air with less resistance. They also focus on use 20 percent thrust at takeoff as compared to industry competitors which can often use as much as 70 percent thrust. That reduced thrust still allows for takeoff but doesn’t strain battery life, which translates to longer flight duration once airborne. “We achieve this by using over-spec’d motors and props couple with extreme light weight airframes,” company officials said. While the Marines are still evaluating the most recent prototypes, McCarter said his company’s next effort will look to the 400 pound to 500 pound payload at the same ranges. The company has designed the device with the field in mind. The drone breaks down into six boxes which can all fit on an all-terrain vehicle such as the Corps’ Polaris MRZR. Set up and tear down can be accomplished in under five minutes and a series of push-pull locking pins clicks it together, no tools required. It can fly in autonomous or semi-autonomous modes through simple tablet computer displays. “Which means if you can pick waypoints on a map, you can fly this drone,” McCarter said. He stressed the niche that a drone like this is filling. While this project is for resupply, the same drone could be used for communications relays or intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. They’re made in a kind of in-between space that is more durable than the hobby drones flown for recreation or photography and the high-end, high-altitude, multimillion dollar drones used for long-range reconnaissance. “Everything we build is designed around what that customer wants to do,” McCarter said. Periscope falls within Chartis Federal, a company that began working with U.S. Customs and Border Patrol in 2008 to solve a communications problem agents were experiencing in rough terrain at the U.S.-Mexico border. Agents would be cut off from communications in deeper valleys or lower areas of steep cliffs. Chartis was able to use tethered drones over those spots to run as kind of mobile communications towers to relay signals and give agents communications in previously no-go areas.

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