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Investigation details fatal insider attack on sergeant major during Army SFAB’s first deployment

Afghan National Police did not typically attend the meetings, or shuras, between U.S. troops and Afghan soldiers on Camp Maiwand in Afghanistan’s eastern Logar province. But the police forces, known as ANP, were necessary on Sept. 3, 2018. Elections were close at hand and the ANP would play a large role in provincial security as…

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Afghan National Police did not typically attend the meetings, or shuras, between U.S. troops and Afghan soldiers on Camp Maiwand in Afghanistan’s eastern Logar province. But the police forces, known as ANP, were necessary on Sept. 3, 2018. Elections were close at hand and the ANP would play a large role in provincial security as insurgents attempted to undermine the country’s already fragile electoral process. Brig. Gen. Muhammad Raziq, commander of the Afghan National Army brigade at Camp Maiwand, invited local ANP leaders, Afghan National Directorate of Security personnel and U.S. advisers to a 10 a.m. shura in his office to discuss operations in Logar and Wardak provinces. The Afghan leaders were accompanied by personal security details that increased the number of attendees beyond what was normal. That helped set the stage for an insider attack, immediately following the shura, that claimed the life of Army Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy Bolyard. Security details were “strictly forbidden from carrying weapons to shura when U.S. advisers [were] present,” according to an Afghan counter-intelligence commander cited in an investigation into the green-on-blue attack. “However, BG Raziq allowed the ANP and NDS [personal security details to bring] their weapons.” The document, obtained by Army Times through a Freedom of Information Act request, implicated and named four ANP officers in the fatal shooting. Officials from U.S. Forces-Afghanistan said they had nothing to add to the report when asked to comment. The ANP security detail never entered Raziq’s office where the shura took place, instead remaining outside on a concrete pad by their vehicles. In Raziq’s office, only the Americans were armed, according to the investigation. The U.S. troops were from the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade, out of Fort Benning, Georgia, the Army’s first SFAB to activate and deploy abroad to train foreign militaries. Bolyard, a six-time Bronze Star recipient and veteran of seven deployments, was the top enlisted soldier for 1st SFAB’s 3rd Squadron. The unit was posted to a U.S.-controlled base adjacent to Camp Maiwand called AP CASA. No body armor on U.S. advisers The shura concluded without issue and the attendees broke for lunch, with the exception of the ANP, who said they planned to return to their own base. Not long afterward, Bolyard and several others who had stopped by the latrines made their way along a narrow path to the chow hall, surrounded on both sides by shipping containers and 12-foot-tall concrete barriers. Sixty meters from the dining facility’s entrance, an AK-47 and PK machine gun erupted behind them. The soldiers dashed for cover in the narrow passage, but Bolyard and another American were hit in the melee. Witnesses saw Bolyard draw his pistol, spin around toward the shura site where the gunfire originated, and then turn back toward cover before falling to the ground. He died a little more than an hour later from a single gunshot wound to his back. The 42-year-old soldier, like other advisers at the shura, wasn’t wearing body armor. It was a decision made by the squadron after discussions with 1st SFAB’s commander, Brig. Gen. Scott A. Jackson. There had been no history of insider attacks at Camp Maiwand, they reasoned, and not wearing full kit symbolized the building of trust between the U.S. advisers and their Afghan partners, according to the investigation. Only one Afghan soldier came forward as an eyewitness to the actual shooting of Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy Bolyard. (Army) During the shura, the ANP security detail had remained outside Raziq’s office by their gun trucks while their leadership entered with the U.S. and Afghan soldiers. A trail of U.S. troops stood guard in the hallways leading from the office back outside. Those Americans did wear body armor, as they were providing security. But soldiers said after the attack that nothing appeared suspicious as they scanned their sectors during the nearly two-hour shura. “No witnesses reported any tension or arguments,” the investigation reads. Afghan soldiers and police outside talked on cell phones. Some inside Raziq’s office joked about their equipment and security shortfalls, banter that an investigator noted was “within cultural norms.” None of the U.S. troops were able to identify the shooter during the attack, only knowing that the fire had come from the direction of the shura they had just left. The attack seemed to end as abruptly as it started. “U.S. forces stated that both the ANA and ANP were mostly standing around and did nothing to help during the immediate aftermath,” according to the investigation. The Americans secured their area and began tending to Bolyard’s wounds, identifying a possible spinal injury and a collapsed lung. They sealed the entrance wound but could find no exit. The team radioed for a quick reaction force and made the roughly four-minute trek back to their side of Camp Maiwand. A surgical team there attempted to stop Bolyard’s bleeding and restart his heart, to no avail. Bolyard was declared deceased a little more than an hour after being shot. The Americans locked down their base to ensure no one could enter or exit and Raziq agreed to do the same. The shooting and the getaway Just before 7 p.m., Raziq called the Americans to inform them that he had captured four ANP officers who were the alleged perpetrators of the attack. Three weapons, five cell phones and six SIM cards were recovered and turned over. Witnesses agreed that shots had come in the direction of the ANP officers located outside Raziq’s office. Only one Afghan soldier, Mohammed Sabir, came forward as an eyewitness to the actual shooting. Sabir recounted seeing an ANP officer named Javed Noorduddin fire about four rounds from his AK-47 at the U.S. advisers. Another ANP officer, Mir Wali, followed by firing two bursts of roughly six rounds from a PK machine gun. Two other ANP officers, Atiq Ullah and Mohammed Farooq, were suspected accomplices. They were accused of driving the car in which the shooters made their escape after they opened fire. Lt. Col. Ian Palmer, right, commander of the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade’s 3rd Squadron, receives a plaque commemorating Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy Bolyard from Afghan Army Brig. Gen. Abdul Raziq, commander of 4th Brigade, 203rd Corps. (Army) The four men successfully departed Camp Maiwand and made their way to a nearby compound operated by the National Directorate of Security — the Afghan government’s primary intelligence agency. But the accounts of how the ANP officers were ultimately captured are disputed in the investigation. Most of the Afghan National Army leaders said that they did not know if the ANP officers left Camp Maiwand, because they were too busy dealing with the aftermath of the attack. One leader claimed that Afghan soldiers intercepted the perpetrators and escorted them back to Camp Maiwand to ensure they did not escape. Raziq claimed that the perpetrators were not allowed to depart Camp Maiwand, but all four of them, as well as other Afghan Army soldiers, stated that the ANP officers left the base. What motive, if any, was ultimately discovered was not shared in the investigation. Nor did the heavily redacted document disclose what punishment was meted out to the Afghan attackers. Officials from U.S. Forces-Afghanistan declined to elaborate on the investigation’s findings. All the recommendations were also redacted, except for one bullet point instructing that the document be shared with the Military Adviser Training Academy at Fort Benning to help future SFAB soldiers, many of whom may still be destined for Afghanistan missions. Advising mission goes on All the key Afghan leaders present during the shura agreed to cooperate with the investigation. An NDS chief of staff who had attended the shura and several other Afghan Army leaders were interviewed by the Americans, and the weapons used in the attack were turned over for ballistics analysis and forensic testing. One month after the fatal attack, Raziq expressed his remorse over the incident during a shared, relationship-mending meal on the American camp. “That was our mistake and we accept that,” Raziq said through an interpreter during the meal, which was chronicled by U.S. soldiers. “I would have preferred to be killed myself.” U.S. soldiers carry the remains of Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy Bolyard at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware on Sept. 5, 2018. (Alex Brandon/AP) Raziq presented a plaque commemorating the fallen sergeant major, and handed over an Afghan rug, asking that it be delivered to Bolyard’s family. “Since the beginning of this Afghan Army, I’ve been working with the Americans shoulder-to-shoulder,” Raziq said. “Today, whatever we have within the Afghan Army, it’s all because of the hard work of Americans and their support.” The loss of Bolyard was not the first insider attack that 1st SFAB suffered during their deployment to Afghanistan. An incident near Tarin Kowt Airfield, in Uruzgan province, two months earlier left one soldier dead and two others wounded. The fallen soldier had been an infantryman serving as security for the SFAB mission. Since the return of 1st SFAB, subsequent units have continued to deploy to Afghanistan. The 2nd SFAB rotated to the country in spring 2019, and the 3rd SFAB replaced them this winter. Currently, the 4th SFAB is training in preparation to deploy there later this summer. Maj. Christina Wright, a spokeswoman for the division-level command overseeing the Army’s SFABs, said U.S. advisers “constantly review and improve” force protection procedures and “apply valuable lessons learned from our previous deployments.” “Even though two years have passed, we still grieve the loss of CSM Bolyard,” Wright said in a statement. “It is our highest priority to ensure our force-protection procedures in the regions where we advise are appropriate for the level of potential risks associated with the missions we conduct.”

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‘Blatant disregard and disrespect of Black people’: Virginia district apologizes for segregated schools – 50 years later

CLOSE 50 years ago, US Supreme Court established the right to public education for all races. But in rural Virginia, black students were shut out of school for 6 more years because the county closed down the public school system. Duration: 02:51 Video pro Loudoun County Public Schools in Virginia issued a formal apology Friday for…

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50 years ago, US Supreme Court established the right to public education for all races. But in rural Virginia, black students were shut out of school for 6 more years because the county closed down the public school system. Duration: 02:51
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Loudoun County Public Schools in Virginia issued a formal apology Friday for being one of the last school systems in the nation to desegregate its schools, following a year of controversy and a probe by the state’s attorney general into allegations of racism.In a letter addressed to the Black community of Loudoun County, officials said they were sorry for their segregated schools which lasted until 1967. That’s nearly 13 years after the nation’s highest court ruled on public school segregation.The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the 1954 decision Brown v. Board of Education that public school segregation was unconstitutional, and that public schools should integrate “with all deliberate speed.” A federal court order in 1967 required the Loudoun County Public Schools to fully integrate, closing the loopholes that it had previously been using for over a dozen years.The apology is one step of the district’s 16-step action framework to address systemic racism, which the district released this summer after steeps of controversy surrounding allegedly racist policies.In a report released June 2019 by the Equity Collaborative, a consulting firm hired by superintendent Eric Williams, students shared anecdotes of their peers use of racial slurs, unfair disciplinary policies and academic expectations.”The N-word gets used ALL the time here,” said one student, who was anonymous.”When a kid who is misbehaving and is Black — why do you hear “that kid’s going to end up in jail someday” — but you don’t hear that about the White kids who mess up,” another student said.Later in 2019, the Virginia Office of the Attorney General sent a letter to the district announcing it was opening an investigation into the allegations outlined in the report, and accusations that the district barred Black students from equal access to advanced programs.The state’s attorney general said that the district must make available all requested records and certain personnel for interviews, according to the letter, which was attached in the superintendent’s response to the request.Virginia schoolapologizes for ‘insensitive’ Underground Railroad activityFriday’s letter further apologized for “negative impact, damage and disadvantages to Black students and families that were caused by decisions made” by the district, including unequal school plans and pay, as well as segregated buildings and transportation.The school board also wrote that it “must continually assess the status of racial equity in the school system and correct its past transgressions as it pertains to race. Although we recognize that we have yet to fully correct or eradicate matters of racial inequality, we hope that issuing this apology with genuine remorse is a valuable step.”Indeed, the letter comes as the school district reports racist incidents in its virtual classrooms on the first week of school.During the week of Sept. 8, several students used racist slurs during class and showed sexual or racist images on screens during online classes, Williams told families in an email, reported local college radio WAMU 88.5.But this incident is far from the only racist incident in the district in recent years.In Feb. 2019, the district’s Madison’s Trust Elementary School issued an apology for holding a physical education class where students in third, fourth and fifth grades pretended to be slaves while participating in an obstacle course representing the Underground Railroad.The lesson was meant to be a cooperative exercise where students worked together to move through six stations representing parts of the Underground Railroad.Contributing: Brett Molina, USA TODAYAutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideRead or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2020/09/25/virginia-school-district-apologize-school-segregation-racism/5645803002/Find New & Used CarsNew CarsUsed CarsofPowered by Cars.com
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Ant Anstead Posts ‘Old Skool’ Pic Wearing Wedding Ring After Christina Anstead Split

Kicking it old school. Ant Anstead interrupted his post-breakup social media hiatus to share a throwback pic. The Wheeler Dealers host, 41, uploaded a photo of himself to Instagram on Thursday, September 24, where he was pictured sticking his head out of a car window. “British cars, American TV, On set (old skool),” he captioned…

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Kicking it old school. Ant Anstead interrupted his post-breakup social media hiatus to share a throwback pic.

The Wheeler Dealers host, 41, uploaded a photo of himself to Instagram on Thursday, September 24, where he was pictured sticking his head out of a car window. “British cars, American TV, On set (old skool),” he captioned the black-and-white shot, in which a glimpse at his wedding band was shown.
The “old skool” portion of his caption seemingly implied that the snap was taken some time before the split.
Ant Anstead and Christina Anstead Shutterstock (2)Ant and Christina Anstead tied the knot in December 2018 after her divorce from Tarek El Moussa was finalized that January. The now-estranged pair welcomed their son Hudson, 12 months, in September 2019.

On September 18, the 37-year-old Christina on the Coast star announced their breakup via Instagram. “Ant and I have made the difficult decision to separate,” she wrote at the time. “We are grateful for each other and as always, our children will remain our priority. We appreciate your support and ask for privacy for us and our family as we navigate the future.”
Ant has not publicly addressed the separation. The U.K. native did, however, celebrate his stepdaughter Taylor’s 10th birthday, posting to his Instagram Story on Tuesday, September 22.
“TEN! And has perfected the perfect pinkie!” he wrote. “Stay just as cool, funny and sassy! Happy birthday TayTay! Love you!!”

Ant has two children from a previous relationship. However, the British TV presenter helped to raise Christina’s daughter alongside her biological father, El Moussa. The exes’ also share 5-year-old son, Brayden.
Christina has maintained a strong coparenting and working relationship with El Moussa, who is engaged to Selling Sunset’s Heather Rae Young. The Flipping 101 star, 39, recently spoke to Us Weekly about how they’ve gotten to a good place post-split.
“We’re cordial and we filmed together,” he said on September 14. “We’re not hanging out on Sundays having barbecues, but you know, it’s all good. Life goes on and we’re good. We’re doing great filming together. The kids are great. And life is good.”
Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories!

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Ukraine military plane crash: Cadets among at least 22 people killed

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Publishedduration1 hour agomedia captionThe plane was carrying cadets on a training flightAt least 22 people, most of them air cadets, have been killed in a military plane crash in Ukraine, officials say. The aircraft, an Antonov-26, came down near the eastern city of Kharkiv as it was landing. The plane was carrying cadets from Kharkiv Air Force University and was on a training flight. Emergency ministry officials say 27 people were on board.Two were seriously injured, and a search operation is continuing into the night for three missing people. The cause of the crash is being investigated.image copyrightUkraine’s emergency ministry via Reutersimage captionFire at the crash site was extinguished late on FridayThe plane came down about 2km (1.2 miles) from a military airport in the town of Chuhuiv, the emergency ministry officials say. There is no suggestion that the crash is linked to the conflict in eastern Ukraine. Chuhuiv is about 100km (60 miles) from the front line where government forces are fighting pro-Russian separatists.Fire broke out at the site and was later extinguished.”It’s a shock,” Deputy Interior Minister Anton Gerashchenko told AFP news agency. “At the moment it’s impossible to establish the cause.”An investigation is under way. President Volodymyr Zelensky is due to travel to the region on Saturday.Kharkiv regional governor Oleksiy Kucher said preliminary information suggested that one of the pilots had reported failure in one engine before the crash, but that this should not have been a critical situation, according to the Interfax-Ukraine news agency. An eyewitness told Reuters news agency he had seen a man in flames running from the wreckage. “Another car stopped behind us. We took a fire extinguisher and ran with another driver to help him,” he said.
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