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‘No heterosexuals were kicked out due to sexuality’: Corps celebrates LGBT Marines

At the beginning of June the Marine Corps issued a forcewide message in recognition of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender pride month. “During the month, we take the opportunity to recognize our LGBT Service Members and reflect upon the past,” the MARADMIN message states. The message comes as the military nears the 10th anniversary of…

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At the beginning of June the Marine Corps issued a forcewide message in recognition of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender pride month. “During the month, we take the opportunity to recognize our LGBT Service Members and reflect upon the past,” the MARADMIN message states. The message comes as the military nears the 10th anniversary of the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell ― a policy that eased the restriction on gay and lesbian service members, but required them to hide their sexual orientation or risk being kicked out of the military. In December 2010 President Barack Obama signed into law the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, and in September 2011 service members no longer faced discharge based on their sexual orientation. The direction to celebrate the Corps’ growing diversity came into the spotlight Monday when the Facebook page for Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, posted a picture to honor pride month and LGBT Marines. The post attracted attention, and as of Tuesday afternoon had more than 1,800 comments and 1,500 shares. While many of the comments supported the post and repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, other commenters saw the post as an attack on religious freedom and a negative sign of the direction of the Marine Corps. 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Those comments were met by responses from Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Yarbrough, a communications officer for the recruit depot, who fiercely defended the Corps’ stance on pride month and the diversity brought by LGBT Marines. “The don’t ask don’t tell worked just fine,” one of the Facebook commenters said. “I would imagine all the LGBT that was kicked out of the service would disagree,” Yarbrough replied. “No heterosexuals were kicked out due to sexuality. The policy was terrible and needed to go away.” More than 13,600 service members were kicked out of the military for their sexuality under the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy, according to the MARADMIN. Another commenter said the post was “totally against my morals and beliefs” and said the Corps is succumbing to “influences that do not belong.” Yarbrough replied: “No one is asking you do anything but accept them as themselves.” A spokesman for Headquarters Marine Corps did not comment on everything posted by the chief warrant officer, but did say most of Yarbrough’s replies matched with the Corps’ values. “Although social media management policies vary between commands, much of the dialogue on this post shows the command responding directly to statements that are not in line with Marine Corps values or current policy,” Capt. Joseph Butterfield told Marine Corps Times in an email Tuesday. “Muting or deleting negative comments allows certain thought processes to go unchallenged,” Butterfield added. “Social media is a two-way communication tool that allows us to engage multiple audiences directly, and sometimes that means disagreeing with members of an audience.” One comment from Yarbrough did raise eyebrows in the Pentagon, however. Butterfield said Headquarters Marine Corps would be reaching out Yarbrough’s command about his use of black socks in his utility uniform. “This is assuming the drill instructors don’t talk to him first,” he said. In case you missed it, more comments from the Facebook page: (MCRD Parris Island screenshot)(MCRD parris island)

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Amazon’s new Ring camera is actually a flying drone — for inside your home – CNET

Ring’s Always Home Cam is an indoor security camera drone. Ring Ring on Thursday introduced a new product to its growing roster of smart home devices — the Ring Always Home Cam. Unlike the Amazon company’s other security cameras, the Always Home Cam is a flying camera drone that docks when it isn’t in use.…

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Ring’s Always Home Cam is an indoor security camera drone.
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Ring on Thursday introduced a new product to its growing roster of smart home devices — the Ring Always Home Cam. Unlike the Amazon company’s other security cameras, the Always Home Cam is a flying camera drone that docks when it isn’t in use. The Ring Always Home Cam will be available in 2021 for $250. Along with this hardware announcement, Ring says you’ll be able to turn on end-to-end encryption in the Ring app’s Control Center “later this year” in an effort to improve the security of its devices. 

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A bit of Ring historyBefore Ring was Ring, it was a startup called Bot Home Automation. Bot Home’s inaugural product, the 2014 Doorbot, was among the first video doorbells on the market. It had a lot of problems, however — clunky design, limited features and poor performance. Then Bot Home rebranded to Ring, was purchased by Amazon and now sells a growing variety of smart home security and automation devices and related accessories.Ring has been in the news for its Neighbors program partnership with law enforcement agencies, which allows Ring customers to share their saved video clips. Privacy advocates express concern about how Ring and law enforcement agencies collect and use the information they gather. Ring also has patents for facial recognition technology that would scan through law enforcement databases. Security has also been a big topic of conversation, following user data being exposed in December 2018. This prompted Ring to require two-factor authentication and add a privacy and security Control Center in the app where customers can more easily find and make changes to their personal account settings. 

The Always Home Cam and end-to-end encryptionRing says the Always Home Cam travels on a set path you designate — it can’t be controlled manually — and you can view the feed live in the Ring app. “The path is entirely determined by the customer … you actually walk the device around your home and … train it on that path and can set different waypoints for the camera to fly to,” Ring President Leila Rouhi told me over the phone. It has HD live streaming and a 5-minute runtime, and takes about an hour to charge. Rouhi said that short runtime was deliberate, to make it a “purpose-driven security camera.” It can work with the Ring Alarm security kit, so that if activity is detected while your security system is set to away mode, the Always Home Cam is supposed to leave its dock and fly around to see what’s happening. As far as privacy goes, the Always Home Cam’s camera is hidden when it’s docked and should only begin to record when it leaves the dock and flies around your house. It’s designed to hum so you know when it’s flying and recording. The camera is also equipped with “obstacle avoidance technology,” so it should avoid things in its path. If it does sense an obstacle in the way of its normal path, the camera will return to its dock and send an alert, letting you know it couldn’t complete its pass around your home. Ring has also added a video encryption page to its Control Center privacy and security landing page. After end-to-end encryption becomes available later this year, customers should be able to turn on the feature for each individual compatible device. Ring will be providing a list of compatible devices later this year.

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Henry Cavill Really Wishes He Could Return For Mission: Impossible 7

While hearing about Tom Cruise’s latest death-defying stunts, Henry Cavill wishes he could be in the upcoming Mission: Impossible 7. While hearing about Tom Cruise’s latest death-defying stunts, Henry Cavill wishes he could be in the upcoming Mission: Impossible 7. Cavill is best known for playing Superman in the DCEU, a role he’s held since 2013…

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While hearing about Tom Cruise’s latest death-defying stunts, Henry Cavill wishes he could be in the upcoming Mission: Impossible 7.
While hearing about Tom Cruise’s latest death-defying stunts, Henry Cavill wishes he could be in the upcoming Mission: Impossible 7. Cavill is best known for playing Superman in the DCEU, a role he’s held since 2013 when Man of Steel hit theaters. Currently, Cavill’s Superman future remains uncertain, but he’s found plenty of exciting roles to fill his time, from Geralt of Rivia in Netflix’s The Witcher to Sherlock in the streamer’s new film Enola Holmes. However, one of Cavill’s more surprising roles came in 2018, when he played CIA agent August Walker in Mission: Impossible – Fallout.

Cavill joined the long-running spy franchise for its most well-received installment yet, and at first, it seemed like he was poised to play yet another good guy. However, Fallout’s big twist revealed Walker was actually the shady extremist Ethan Hunt (Cruise) and his team had spent the entire film tracking. Indeed, Superman had become the villain. Unfortunately (or perhaps hilariously), much of Cavill’s presence in Fallout was overshadowed by talk of his mustache, which famously had to be removed via CGI for Justice League. Nevertheless, Cavill made a solid addition to Fallout’s ranks, so it’s no surprise that he would like to return.

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Related: Every Character Not Returning In Mission: Impossible 7

While appearing on the Empire Podcast to discuss Enola Holmes, Cavill briefly touched upon his time within the Mission: Impossible world. Production has recently resumed on Mission: Impossible 7, and Cruise has been spotted performing some truly insane stunts. Cavill was asked if those stunts make him miss his time on Fallout or if they fill him relief that he’s no longer involved. Unsurprisingly, his answer was the former, as he said, “I was extremely jealous. Extremely jealous. I want to be there, I want to be parachuting off a motorbike into a canyon. Why can’t I be there?” He then went on to praise Cruise and the rest of the franchise, emphasizing, “I miss it terribly.”

Since Cavill is often placed within the hero role, it was quite refreshing to see him play the bad guy in Fallout. It allowed the actor to broaden his horizons somewhat and break out of the Superman mold, something he’s done even more with The Witcher. Plus, the climax of Fallout saw him and Cruise go head to head in an intense fight atop a cliff, so clearly Cavill doesn’t have much reason to be put off by anxiety-inducing stunts.

Unfortunately, that clifftop fight saw Walker plummet to his death, so it seems unlikely that Cavill will ever return to the Mission: Impossible franchise unless it is via flashback (which is always a possibility). Mission: Impossible 7 is shaping up to be another epic installment, particularly because it’s the first in a two-part story. Plot details are still being kept under wraps, but from the stunts alone, it’s clear Ethan isn’t letting his bruising battle with Walker keep him down. It’s just a shame Cavill won’t get to join in on the fun this time around.advertising’);
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COVID-19 economic recovery bill will be a confidence vote: Liberal House leader | CBC News

Politics·NewGovernment House leader Pablo Rodriguez says the Liberals’ recently introduced COVID-19 economic package bill will be a vote of confidence, putting the minority government to the test.NDP has said it will support Bill C-4, which introduces new benefits to move Canadians off the CERBCBC News · Posted: Sep 29, 2020 11:30 AM ET | Last Updated:…

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Politics·NewGovernment House leader Pablo Rodriguez says the Liberals’ recently introduced COVID-19 economic package bill will be a vote of confidence, putting the minority government to the test.NDP has said it will support Bill C-4, which introduces new benefits to move Canadians off the CERBCBC News · Posted: Sep 29, 2020 11:30 AM ET | Last Updated: September 29Leader of the Government in the House of Commons Pablo Rodriguez says the Liberals’ new COVID-19 aid bill will be a vote of confidence. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)Government House leader Pablo Rodriguez says the Liberals’ recently introduced COVID-19 economic package bill will be a vote of confidence, putting the minority government to the test. Bill C-4 would introduce a series of new COVID-19 benefits for Canadians to ease their transition from the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB).”We are in the [second] wave of #COVID-19, but we have a plan. Our bill on sick leave and support to families is at the core of it. We will consider the vote on the legislation as a matter of confidence,” Rodriguez tweeted Tuesday morning. “Canadians can’t wait. We need to move forward. Together.” This means the Liberals’ minority government could face its first make-or-break test of the fall sitting as early as tonight. The first scheduled confidence vote had been the upcoming vote on the speech from the throne; the Conservatives have said categorically that they will not support the speech. C-4 makes multiple key changes to the federal government’s suite of pandemic benefits and makes the rules on qualifying for employment insurance more flexible. Last week, the government secured NDP support for the bill by boosting the value of the weekly benefit for self-employed or gig workers to $500 from $400. The New Democrats’ support would all but guarantee the bill’s passage and avoid a snap election.  The Liberal government has been asking Parliament to fast-track the legislation, infuriating opposition critics who accuse the government of ducking another debate after it prorogued Parliament in August. The legislation also would set up three new benefits for Canadians who won’t qualify for EI but are still affected by the COVID-19 crisis. They include the Canada Recovery Benefit for self-employed and gig workers who still won’t qualify for EI, expanded sick leave and caregiver benefits for workers who have to stay home because they or someone they care for has to temporarily isolate because of COVID-19. The House held its first virtual vote last night, which was delayed due to technical glitches. With files from The Canadian Press
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