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Trump asked China to help him win in 2020, offered ‘favours to dictators,’ John Bolton says in book | CBC News

In a withering behind-the-scenes portrayal, U.S. President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser John Bolton accused him of sweeping misdeeds that included explicitly seeking Chinese President Xi Jinping’s help to win re-election. Bolton, a longtime foreign policy hawk who Trump fired in September over policy differences, also said that the U.S. president had expressed a…

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Trump asked China to help him win in 2020, offered ‘favours to dictators,’ John Bolton says in book | CBC News

In a withering behind-the-scenes portrayal, U.S. President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser John Bolton accused him of sweeping misdeeds that included explicitly seeking Chinese President Xi Jinping’s help to win re-election. Bolton, a longtime foreign policy hawk who Trump fired in September over policy differences, also said that the U.S. president had expressed a willingness to halt criminal investigations to give “personal favours to dictators he liked,” according to a book excerpt published in the New York Times ahead of its release.Trump hit back at Bolton, calling him “a liar” in an interview with the Wall Street Journal. The paper also published excerpts Wednesday of the book, titled The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir, as did the Washington Post. Trump told Fox News in a separate interview that Bolton had broken the law by including highly classified material in the book. Together, the excerpts portray a U.S. president mocked by his top advisers and who exposed himself to far more extensive accusations of impropriety than those that drove the Democratic-led House of Representatives to impeach Trump last year. WATCH | Bolton’s book claims Trump is uninformed, White House is in chaos: According to several U.S. media reports, John Bolton’s new book alleges that U.S. President Donald Trump is uninformed and all his decisions were made with the 2020 presidential election in mind. 2:00 The Republican-led Senate acquitted Trump in early February. Trump was accused of withholding U.S. military aid last year to put pressure on newly elected Ukrainian President Volodymr Zelensky to provide damaging information on Democratic political opponent Joe Biden. “Had Democratic impeachment advocates not been so obsessed with their Ukraine blitzkrieg in 2019, had they taken the time to inquire more systematically about Trump’s behaviour across his entire foreign policy, the impeachment outcome might well have been different,” Bolton wrote, according to excerpts in the Wall Street Journal. Critics of Bolton note he declined to testify before the House inquiry when his disclosures could have been critical. Representative Adam Schiff, the California Democrat who led the prosecution of Republican Trump, slammed Bolton for saying at the time that “he’d sue if subpoenaed.” “Instead, he saved it for a book,” Schiff said on Twitter. “Bolton may be an author, but he’s no patriot.” Still, Bolton’s allegations provide new ammunition to critics ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election, including his behind-the-scenes accounts of Trump’s conversations with China’s Xi — which, in one case, broached the topic of the U.S. vote. “Trump then, stunningly, turned the conversation to the coming U.S. presidential election, alluding to China’s economic capability and pleading with Xi to ensure he’d win,” Bolton wrote, in the most in-depth, damaging portrayal by a Trump administration insider to date and just days after former defence secretary Jim Mattis accused the president of trying to divide America. Lighthizer denies Bolton’s account Biden said in a statement: “If these accounts are true, it’s not only morally repugnant, it’s a violation of Donald Trump’s sacred duty to the American people.” U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in Senate testimony that Bolton’s account was “absolutely untrue.” “I was at the meeting. Would I recollect something as crazy as that? Of course I would,” Lighthizer said. “This never happened in it for sure. Completely crazy.” The U.S. government has sued to block Bolton from publishing the book, citing risks to national security, and is seeking a court hearing on Friday. Publisher Simon & Schuster has dismissed the accusations, and said “hundreds of thousands of copies” of the book have already been distributed. Although Trump’s administration had been critical of China’s mass detention of the mostly Muslim Uighur minority and other Muslim groups, Trump gave Xi Jinping, right, a green light in June 2019 in Osaka, Japan, Bolton said. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters) Although Trump’s administration had been strongly critical of China’s mass detention of the mostly Muslim Uighur minority and other Muslim groups, Trump gave Xi a green light in June 2019 in Osaka, Japan, Bolton said. “According to our interpreter, Trump said that Xi should go ahead with building the camps, which Trump thought was exactly the right thing to do,” Bolton wrote, saying another top White House official said Trump made similar comments during his November 2017 trip to China. Bolton cited a number of conversations in which Trump demonstrated “fundamentally unacceptable behaviour that eroded the very legitimacy of the presidency.” A former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and Fox News television commentator, Bolton’s hawkish approach had worn on a president weary of foreign military entanglements, officials say. Pompeo mocked Trump, Bolton writes Trump would sometimes chide Bolton in meetings, introducing him to visiting foreign leaders by saying, “You all know the great John Bolton. He’ll bomb you. He’ll take out your whole country.” In excerpts published in the Washington Post, Bolton writes that Trump said invading Venezuela would be “cool” and that it was “really part of the United States.” The U.S. government has publicly said it does not favour using force to topple Venezuela’s socialist President Nicolas Maduro. The book also exposed the sometimes dim view that Trump’s advisers have of him. During a 2018 meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Bolton says he got a note from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo mocking Trump. “He is so full of shit,” Pompeo’s note said, according to a Bolton excerpt in the Washington Post. Although Trump is publicly critical of journalists, Bolton’s book quotes the U.S. president making some of his most alarming remarks to date. In a summer 2019 meeting in New Jersey, Trump allegedly said journalists should be jailed so they have to divulge their sources: “These people should be executed. They are scumbags,” according to another excerpt in the Post.
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Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins oppose vote on Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement before election

CLOSE Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died at age 87. Ginsburg is most noted for her lifelong fight for equality for women. USA TODAYSen. Lisa Murkowski definitively said Sunday she does not support voting on a nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court before the Nov. 3 election, repeating a belief…

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Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins oppose vote on Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement before election

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Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died at age 87. Ginsburg is most noted for her lifelong fight for equality for women.

USA TODAYSen. Lisa Murkowski definitively said Sunday she does not support voting on a nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court before the Nov. 3 election, repeating a belief she had expressed previously when the question was theoretical.”For weeks, I have stated that I would not support taking up a potential Supreme Court vacancy this close to the election. Sadly, what was then a hypothetical is now our reality, but my position has not changed,” the Alaska Republican said in a statement. Hours before Ginsburg’s death was announced, Murkowski told Alaska Public Media on Friday she would not vote on a nominee so close to an election. She cited the decision in 2016 not to move forward with a vote on Merrick Garland, who was nominated by then-President Barack Obama in March, because Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell thought it should be left up to the voters in November. “The closer you get to an election, that argument becomes even more important,” she said.November election: Trump, Democrats thrust Supreme Court fight forward as a central issue”I did not support taking up a nomination eight months before the 2016 election to fill the vacancy created by the passing of Justice Scalia,” Murkowski said Sunday. “We are now even closer to the 2020 election – less than two months out – and I believe the same standard must apply.” McConnell, R-Ky., has said the Senate would hold a full vote on President Donald Trump’s nominee. Trump has said he plans to offer up a nominee soon. Murkowski joins Sen. Susan Collins of Maine as the only two Senate Republicans to explicitly reject the idea of voting on a nominee before the election. Two more GOP senators would have to join them to give Democrats the 51 votes needed to block a potential nominee. On Saturday, Collins – a moderate from Maine who is locked in a tight battle for reelection – said “in order for the American people to have faith in their elected officials, we must act fairly and consistently – no matter which political party is in power.” She said Trump has the constitutional authority to put forward a nominee and she would have no problem with the Senate Judiciary Committee beginning the review process. “Given the proximity of the presidential election, however, I do not believe that the Senate should vote on the nominee prior to the election,” she said. “In fairness to the American people, who will either be re-electing the president or selecting a new one, the decision on a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court should be made by the President who is elected on November 3rd.” Who might succeed Justice Ginsburg?: Trump’s short list begins with these five women (and one man)Pelosi: Democrats ‘have our options’ when asked about impeaching Trump if he replaces GinsburgAutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideRead or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2020/09/20/lisa-murkowski-opposes-ruth-bader-ginsburg-replacement-before-election/5845511002/Find New & Used CarsNew CarsUsed CarsofPowered by Cars.com
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Montreal, Quebec City to face new restrictions as Quebec tries to fend off 2nd wave of COVID-19 | CBC News

The Quebec government is expected to announce today that it is reducing the size of private gatherings and imposing new restrictions on bars and restaurants in the province’s two biggest cities, after an increase in COVID-19 infections. Radio-Canada has learned that Montreal, Quebec City and the Chaudière-Appalaches region, which is south of Quebec City, will…

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Montreal, Quebec City to face new restrictions as Quebec tries to fend off 2nd wave of COVID-19 | CBC News

The Quebec government is expected to announce today that it is reducing the size of private gatherings and imposing new restrictions on bars and restaurants in the province’s two biggest cities, after an increase in COVID-19 infections. Radio-Canada has learned that Montreal, Quebec City and the Chaudière-Appalaches region, which is south of Quebec City, will be placed on “moderate alert.”That is the orange, or second-highest, alert level under the province’s regional system for categorizing the danger posed by the novel coronavirus. Government officials told Radio-Canada they are still finalizing their decision, but barring any other major developments, the announcement is expected to be made Sunday. On Saturday, Quebec reported 427 new cases of COVID-19, the highest daily increase since May. Being placed in the orange category — up from yellow, designated as the “early warning” level — will come with tightened public-health restrictions. According to Radio-Canada, these restrictions are likely to include:  Reducing the maximum number of people allowed at a private gathering from 10 to six. Reducing the maximum number of people allowed per restaurant table from 10 to six. Requiring bars to stop serving alcohol earlier than midnight. A provincewide police operation was conducted this weekend to investigate whether bars are respecting public-health rules. Sources told Radio-Canada that further measures could be taken pending the results of the operation.  Gatherings in indoor and outdoor public places are also expected to be limited to 50, as opposed to 250 people. But government officials said there will be exceptions to that rule. For example, in theatres and cinemas where physical distancing is easily respected, the 250-person limit would remain, but wearing a mask would be mandatory at all times, even when seated. It is still unclear whether school activities will be affected by the decision to place the three regions in the orange level. Quebec Health Minister Christian Dubé, public health director Dr. Horacio Arruda and Dr. Éric Litvak, medical advisor to public health, will give an update on the COVID-19 situation in Montreal at 5 p.m. ET Sunday.
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Nunavut now has 2 confirmed cases of COVID-19 | CBC News

The latest: Nunavut reports first COVID-19 cases involving 2 mine workers. Quebec Premier François Legault tests negative for COVID-19. Ontario limits gathering sizes provincewide after reporting 407 new cases. Police disperse crowd at ‘impromptu car show’ in Hamilton, Ont. Two miners who were exposed to COVID-19 in their home jurisdictions before travelling are being monitored in Nunavut.Dr. Michael Patterson,…

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Nunavut now has 2 confirmed cases of COVID-19 | CBC News

The latest: Nunavut reports first COVID-19 cases involving 2 mine workers. Quebec Premier François Legault tests negative for COVID-19. Ontario limits gathering sizes provincewide after reporting 407 new cases. Police disperse crowd at ‘impromptu car show’ in Hamilton, Ont. Two miners who were exposed to COVID-19 in their home jurisdictions before travelling are being monitored in Nunavut.Dr. Michael Patterson, Nunavut’s chief public health officer, announced the cases at the Hope Bay gold mine in a news release Saturday issued by the territorial government. These are the first cases of the infection to be reported in Nunavut since the pandemic began, but since they didn’t originate in the territory they’ll instead be counted in other jurisdictions, said Cate Macleod, spokesperson for Premier Joe Savikataaq. “Both miners are asymptomatic and were immediately isolated and swabbed for the virus,” Patterson said. No residents from the territory itself work at the site, 125 kilometres southwest of Cambridge Bay, so it’s believed the risk of community spread remains low. In Quebec, Premier François Legault said he has tested negative for COVID-19. Legault and his wife were tested after meeting with Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole last Monday. O’Toole tested positive for the virus Friday. In a message posted Saturday to social media, Legault said he will remain in isolation until Sept. 28. This comes as Quebec reported its highest total of new cases since late May, as well as five additional deaths. The 427 new cases bring the provincial total to a national high of 67,080 confirmed infections, with 5,797 deaths. The Quebec government is expected to announce later Sunday that it is reducing the size of private gatherings in Montreal, Quebec City and the Chaudière-Appalaches region, south of Quebec City. All three regions will move into the “moderate” orange level in its alert system. That’s up from yellow, or “early warning.” The province is looking at reducing the maximum number of people allowed at a private gathering from 10 to six in these regions, Radio-Canada reports. In addition, the maximum number of people allowed per restaurant table would be lowered from 10 to six, and bars would have to stop serving alcohol earlier than midnight. WATCH | Ontario Premier Doug Ford limits social gatherings provincewide: Ontario Premier Doug Ford announced the province is lowering the number of people allowed at social gatherings across Ontario. 1:25 Ontario saw its caseload jump by 407 on Saturday for a total of 46,484, with 2,865 deaths. Premier Doug Ford announced a tightening of restrictions on private social gatherings. People in every region of the province can only gather in groups of 10 people indoors, and 25 outdoors under orders continuing until Oct. 22.  Police in Hamilton, Ont., dispersed a crowd on Saturday night that they say was well over the new allowable limits for outdoor social gatherings. An example of the impact the #COVIDAlert app can have. Download it today for free to help break the cycle of #COVID19 infections. https://t.co/GQCfsuMG6A https://t.co/kf1gfTXquC—@CPHO_Canada Officers from nearby Peel and York regions, along with Ontario Provincial Police, joined efforts to shut down what police called an “impromptu car show” in a parking lot. People had brought about 500 cars to the parking lot at Cineplex Cinemas Ancaster for the event, said Staff Sgt. Richard Vanderboom of Hamilton Police Mountain Station. He declined to estimate how many people were there. As of 8:30 a.m. ET on Sunday, Canada had 142,774 confirmed or presumptive coronavirus cases. Provinces and territories listed 124,187 of those as recovered or resolved. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial reports, regional health information and CBC’s reporting stood at 9,251. What’s happening around the rest of Canada In downtown Calgary, a restaurant owner says he’s near the point of having to hire security because staff are facing harassment from customers who do not want to wear face coverings. Stephen Deere, owner of Modern Steak, says the level of disrespect from patrons refusing to wear a mask has been escalating in recent days. “We’re in a democracy, and I believe you have the right to have your opinion and you have the right to protest,” Deere said. “But when you’re taking it out on the front-line workers and retail and hospitality, and they’re feeling threatened up to the point that violence could occur, it’s time to ring the alarm.” Calgary council voted earlier this month to keep masks mandatory in indoor public spaces, including restaurants, and on public transit, with the next update on masks coming in December. Physical distancing, extreme levels of fatigue are concerns for Alberta teachers, survey suggests Montreal advocates concerned new mask fines will target vulnerable communities Overcrowded buses worry commuters as COVID-19 cases rise, weather turns colder Ontario health-care worker returns home six months after testing positive for COVID-19 What’s happening around the world According to Johns Hopkins University, the global total of confirmed coronavirus cases stands at more than 30.8 million. More than 957,000 people have died, while 21 million have recovered. In London, England, hundreds of people gathered on Saturday to protest the latest COVID-19 restrictions. There were scuffles between demonstrators and police who moved in to disperse the crowd in Trafalgar Square. Protesters attend a rally Saturday at Trafalgar Square in London to protest against restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of COVID-19. (Hollie Adams/Getty Images) Many held placards calling for “freedom” from the restrictions, while some called the pandemic a hoax. The U.K. reported more than 4,400 new COVID-19 cases on Saturday, it’s highest single-day spike since May. In Spain, people protested in Madrid on Sunday against the handling of the coronavirus pandemic by the city’s regional head, who has placed new restrictions on neighbourhoods with the highest contagion rates. Wearing face masks and trying to maintain distancing, protesters clapped in unison while shouting for regional President Isabel Diaz Ayuso to step down. Demonstrators gather in front of the Assembly of Madrid on Sunday to protest against the new restrictive measures announced by regional authorities. (Oscar del Pozo/AFP/Getty Images) The restrictions affect around 860,000 people who won’t be able to leave their neighbourhoods except for essential activities, including work or a medical appointment. Parks in the area are closed and shops and restaurants have to limit occupancy to 50 per cent. Spain is struggling to contain a second wave of the novel coronavirus, which has killed at least 30,400 people, according to the Spanish health ministry. Madrid’s rate of transmission is more than double the national average, which already leads European contagion charts.
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