See Inside a $18.5 M. New York Town House Decorated by Julian Schnabel and His Former Wife - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
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See Inside a $18.5 M. New York Town House Decorated by Julian Schnabel and His Former Wife

A five-story town house in New York’s Greenwich Village neighborhood that was decorated by painter and filmmaker Julian Schnabel has hit the market for the first time in 30 years—with a price tag of $18.5 million. Roughly 6,600 square feet, the Italianate town house at 132 West 11th Street has been in the Schnabel family…

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See Inside a $18.5 M. New York Town House Decorated by Julian Schnabel and His Former Wife

A five-story town house in New York’s Greenwich Village neighborhood that was decorated by painter and filmmaker Julian Schnabel has hit the market for the first time in 30 years—with a price tag of $18.5 million. Roughly 6,600 square feet, the Italianate town house at 132 West 11th Street has been in the Schnabel family since the 1990s. Though the artist and his first wife, art collector Jacqueline Schnabel, did not reside there—they lived a few blocks away—the interior bears their work. A cavernous dining room is outfitted with baby-pink patent leather chairs, and a white carpet is offset with green and fuchsia paint. A bull’s bleached skull emerges from the hearth of a fireplace in the home office.

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“When you are there, you feel as if you are traveling on a boat down the Nile,” Lola Montes Schnabel, Julian’s daughter, said in a statement to the Wall Street Journal. “Natural light floods the house from every direction, as if bouncing off water.”

According to the listing agent, Michael Bolla of Sotheby’s International Realty, the house includes four bedrooms, four terraces, a light-filled art studio, library, and a 1,000-square-foot basement. Past visitors to the town house described an environment that embraced spontaneity. According to a 1994 profile in T Magazine, a George Condo painting was once perched in the fireplace (“I put things where I can enjoy them, that’s all,” Jacqueline told the interviewer).

Although divorced, the duo worked together during the renovation. Julian laid the kitchen floor and made furniture, including the kitchen table and Jacqueline’s rolled steel bed. They instructed the architects, David Piscuskas and Juergen Riehm of 1100 Architect, to restore the house to its 19th-century spaciousness. The architects, in turn, tore off the house’s rear and added a glass-bottomed terrace on the third floor.

Unfortunately for the new owners, the residence won’t come with Schnabel’s art collection, which includes works by Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Francesco Clemente, and Francis Picabia (among many Schnabels, of course).

Take a tour of the house in the slideshow above.

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Ming Smith Photographs Michael Jordan, Women Basketball Players for Nike’s Jordan Brand

Artist Ming Smith, in a recent interview with her gallerist Nicola Vassell, compared her photography technique to a shot in basketball: “The power of anticipation and the patience to wait for what’s coming. It’s like a basketball player hitting three-pointers: practice, repeat, practice, repeat. You get better, and still you’ll miss a few. In photography,…

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Ming Smith Photographs Michael Jordan, Women Basketball Players for Nike’s Jordan Brand

Artist Ming Smith, in a recent interview with her gallerist Nicola Vassell, compared her photography technique to a shot in basketball: “The power of anticipation and the patience to wait for what’s coming. It’s like a basketball player hitting three-pointers: practice, repeat, practice, repeat. You get better, and still you’ll miss a few. In photography, you have to nail it the moment it’s in the lens. Take the shot when you see it.” In a project tied to the 25th season of the Women’s National Basketball Association, which launched last month at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, Smith had the chance to shoot some of the players hitting those three-pointers.

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Earlier this year, with Vassell’s help as creative director, Nike’s Jordan Brand brought on Smith to photograph women members of the Jordan Brand family who, together, represent the largest group of female athletes to be endorsed by Jordan. The photographs include portraits of Minnesota Lynx guard Crystal Dangerfield, New York Liberty guard Kia Nurse, Dallas Wings forward Satou Sabally, L.A. Sparks point guard Te’a Cooper, Dallas wings guard Chelsea Dungee, Los Angeles Sparks guard Arella Guirantes, Minnesota Lynx forward Aerial Powers, Las Vegas Aces forward Dearica Hamby, and Seattle Storm guard Jordin Canada.
Smith is known for the candid, impeccably composed photographs she has been making for over four decades, since she became the first and only female member of Kamoinge, a collective of Black photographers founded by Roy DeCarava. In her photographs for the Jordan shoot, the athletes are shown, both individually and as a group, standing in a field of tall grass, wearing black dresses or black pantsuits. In two of the photos, they flank six-time NBA champion and Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan himself.
Of interacting with the athletes, Smith said she and the shoot’s stylist Carlos Nazario, global fashion director of i-D magazine, “were trying to capture their essence.”
She added, “Empowering images are not stereotypical. Our mothers didn’t have to show huge cleavage, but they were very female. They were women. We are women. So just their beauty is beautiful to me inside and out. It’s the physical and spiritual … the spirit.”
Michael Jordan sees the Jordan Brand family in connection with his racial justice efforts. In early June 2020, shortly after the death of George Floyd and subsequent protests, Jordan announced he would make a $100 million donation to combat racism, which will go to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Formerly Incarcerated, Convicted Peoples and Families Movement, Black Voters Matter, and other organizations. He said at the time that “Jordan Brand, the Jordan Family and our partners… share a commitment to address the historical inequality that continues to plague Black Communities in the U.S.”

Earlier this spring, Vassell opened her new New York gallery with an exhibition of Smith’s photographs titled “Evidence.” A number of Smith’s images from the Jordan project will be on view at the gallery as the small pop-up exhibition from June 29 through July 3.

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Hard Truths: How Do I Make Curators Respect Me?

I’m a new media artist who freelances around the art world to make a living. I’ve lived in New York for almost ten years, but still can’t afford a studio separate from my apartment. I’ve always thought this was fine, as I have my own dedicated room, and since my work is digital it isn’t…

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Hard Truths: How Do I Make Curators Respect Me?

I’m a new media artist who freelances around the art world to make a living. I’ve lived in New York for almost ten years, but still can’t afford a studio separate from my apartment. I’ve always thought this was fine, as I have my own dedicated room, and since my work is digital it isn’t hazardous and doesn’t take up space. Yet I’ve heard both artists and gallerists dismiss artists who don’t have a separate studio as not serious, which strikes me as an absolutely insane thing to say in this city. Please tell them.
Dear Them,
Hello, it’s Chen & Lampert. Yes, that Chen & Lampert, and believe us, it wasn’t our idea to write this letter. We are reaching out on behalf of an anonymous new media artist who submitted a question to our advice column. Well, their submission wasn’t actually phrased in the form of a question, but from what we can gather you’ve been razzing them for not having a dedicated art studio. Is it true that you don’t think they are serious? We understand the challenge of taking seriously anyone who identifies as a new media artist, given that the term has not been uttered since the eve of Y2K. Nevertheless, as ethicists, we cannot simply push this complaint aside.

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Perhaps the real problem here is the word “serious” and what it implies. Thousands of artists earn MFAs every year, and given the cost of such programs one would assume that most graduates are dead serious about pursuing careers. Only a minute fraction of these hopefuls will ever make it big, but this doesn’t mean that those who fall short will just quit. Emboldened artists possessed of an unwavering creative spirit will make work whether or not they have representation, shows, or an audience. Why do they do this? Despite substantial obstacles and their own crushing self-doubt, artists continually create because they don’t know what else to do with their energy, ideas, and anxieties. It is impossible to stop them, even with your snide comments.
Perhaps you’ve heard of the pandemic that the world has been experiencing since early 2020. Whether they like it or not, people have been learning to embrace the reality of working out of their closets and bathtubs. For a sculptor or painter this could be tricky, but new media artists can easily go “post-studio” if they have a digital practice that takes up little space. Maybe the real question here, in an age of Zoom offices, is: Who gives a crap? The last thing you want to do is to ask this struggling new media artist to spend more money on studio rent after accruing debilitating debt from art school. Cut this poor artist a break and request a Vimeo link to see their latest work. By doing so, you’ll save yourself a schlep out to Maspeth for strained conversation and an uncomfortable screening spent seated in a still-damp chair that they fished out of a dumpster. Everybody sort of wins.

I’ve been tagging buildings and trains around the world for the last two decades and people know me in the scene. It’s cool but comes with lots of risk. I’m not getting younger, and spending another night in jail isn’t on the top of my list of attractions when I bomb a new city with my art. The contemporary art world has a lot of interest in street artists like me, and seeing how Banksy and KAWS blew up, I know it’s my turn to cash in by bringing my legacy to a bigger stage. Do you have pointers on how to get my tag legally on the walls of the Museum of Modern Art? That’s my heaven spot right now.
We’re thrilled that street artists check out our column and that the Hard Truths tag has become indelibly spray-painted on the hearts and minds of our readers. We get that you want to see your work on MoMA’s walls, but have you ever considered entering through the gift shop? Charm the buyer into putting your toys, T-shirts, and sneakers in the design store, then sell tons of it, forcing the hoity-toity curators at the actual museum to recognize you because you’ve made them so much bank. The Warhol comparisons will start rolling in. If this approach doesn’t work, you can always try being a DJ, because a DJ has a better chance at getting their foot in a museum these days than an artist. If all that fails, try to get adopted by Agnes Gund.
Got a question? Email [email protected]

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Spend $10 with a Small Business This Weekend and Get a $10 Credit to Use on Prime Day!

Shop small and be rewarded! Spend $10 this weekend at a small business on Amazon, and get a $10 credit toward your Prime Day purchases.  Itching for Amazon Prime Day? Here’s a tip: You can save $10 during the event next week (12 a.m. PDT on June 21 to 11:59 p.m. PDT on June 22)…

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Spend $10 with a Small Business This Weekend and Get a $10 Credit to Use on Prime Day!

Shop small and be rewarded! Spend $10 this weekend at a small business on Amazon, and get a $10 credit toward your Prime Day purchases. 
Itching for Amazon Prime Day? Here’s a tip: You can save $10 during the event next week (12 a.m. PDT on June 21 to 11:59 p.m. PDT on June 22) by starting your shopping early. Through midnight on Sunday, June 20, Amazon is offering a $10 credit to use on Prime Day to members who spend $10 on products from select small businesses selling in Amazon’s store (exclusions apply).
To get access to the deals, however, you have to be an Amazon Prime subscriber.

Every year, Amazon’s Prime Day offers thousands of deals on the site’s products, from electronics to books and art supplies. This year, the 48-hour event will begin at 12 a.m. PDT on Monday, June 21 and conclude at 11:59 p.m. PDT on Tuesday, June 22. To get access to the deals, however, you have to be an Amazon Prime subscriber.

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Amazon Prime costs $12.99 a month or $119 a year. Its benefits include faster shipping on Amazon orders, discounts at Whole Foods, and access to Amazon’s streaming entertainment. You can also pick up a free 30-day trial of Prime here.
Click here to see all participating businesses; see below for some of our favorites for art and craft supplies (we’ll be updating this page all weekend, so check back in with us often!):
***NEW*** Cruelty-free paintbrushesFounded over 25 years ago in Howard Kaufman’s Princeton, New Jersey, basement, the Princeton Artist Brush Company is still a family-owned business. With a well-deserved reputation for high-quality products, it may be best known for its its premier synthetic brushes, including these Heritage series synthetic sable brushes for watercolor.

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Recyclable gift wrapStock up on high-quality cards, envelopes, and wrapping supplies at the one-stop paper store Note Card Café. Operated by the California small business Graphic Business Solutions, Note Card Café collaborates with artists to produce unique designs that are expertly printed and packaged. We like its rolls of Kraft wrapping paper, which comes in a range of colors and patterns.

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High-quality muslinWhether used for pattern-making, photography backdrops, or painting canvases, a good piece of muslin should be clean, easy to de-wrinkle, and showcase an even weave. Those from AK-Trading Co., a two-decade-old, family-owned business in Chatsworth, California, check off all those boxes and more. The company’s 100-percent cotton muslin has a nice medium heft, and even comes finished with selvage edges. Choose from unbleached, white, or black.

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DIY soap kitsSituated within the tall pines of Heber-Overgaard in Arizona is the small family-owned business Wild Herb Soap Co., which produces handcrafted self-care products such as lotion, balms, and of course, soaps. While you can purchase readymade products, we’re keen on their raw products, from 100-percent natural beeswax pellets to well-sized palm kernel flakes, which can be used for soap-making.

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***NEW*** Pro metal-working toolsPMC Supplies, based in Upstate New York, is a purveyor of tools to jewelry makers and metal workers from beginners to experts. They carry everything from professional-grade specialty items like graphite crucibles to all-inclusive jewelry-making kits for those just starting out.

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Wild fabricsSince 1983, the family-operated Fabric Empire has been creating unusual fabrics in all kinds of patterns. Think light blue suede cow print, Froot Loop-colored and highly textured synthetic shag, and rose-hued embossed taffeta. In our book, this is the store to go for faux furs, sold by the yard and soft enough to sleep on. Where else will you find the perfect rainbow-striped, long-pile fake gorilla fur?

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Frames and matsThe Display Guys, a family-owned company in business since 1999, is a great go-to to find just what you need to display your artworks, from photographs to prints. Frames are available in black, white, gray, and bronze, in wood, aluminum, and plastic, and in one dozen sizes, from 4-by-6 inches to 20-by-24 inches. They sell mat boards, too, including bulk packs of acid-free, precisely cut boards that will make any artwork look professionally put-together.

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Heat-transfer vinyl sheetsBased out of Cedar City, Utah, FireFly Craft specializes in heat-transfer vinyl, which it sells by the roll or in convenient multicolor bundles. There are tons of color options to choose from, including fluorescents; most are compatible with cutting machines, so you can  easily trace custom designs. We are fans of their flocked vinyl, which features a pleasingly soft, fuzzy texture on its exposed side.

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Premium modeling and ceramics clayAlso in Utah, Artistic Industries is run by April Butterfield Simister and Michael Simister, who are growing their ceramics supply business with their three kids. (“A family that clays together stays together,” they have said.) Stock up on Laguna air-dry clay of different colors, from an electric brown to a speckled buff .

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Industrial-strength gluingSurebonder Adhesives began in 1968 as an eyelet and rivet distributor in a single-car garage in Wauconda, Illinois. Now, the family-owned business specializes in a different kind of adhesive tool: the glue gun. Its 60-watt cordless hot glue gun is one popular product to definitely check out. It heats up fast, feels comfortable in the hand, and comes with a stand designed to catch unwanted drips.

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***NEW*** Glowy paints and pigmentsIf luminescence is your thing, Glomania USA sells glow-in-the-dark, UV black light, and color-changing paints and pigments, both daytime visible and daytime invisible. Shop their store for glowy art tools like black-light poster paints and nail art kits.

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Sticky, eye-catching tapeThese tapes are designed by Hoopologie, a self-described “DIY hula hoop supply company” and are used to decorate hula hoops, but honestly, they would make pretty great art materials too. The Boulder, Colorado business sells high tensile strength and heat-resistant electrical tape in wondrous colors like Royal Purple as well as truly gorgeous decorative tapes in pearlescent finishes. Many tapes change color depending on your viewing angle, which adds extra oomph to your projects.

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Multicolor Miyuki seed beadsColorado bead peddler Rockin Beads has been selling beads and other craft supplies for more than 10 years, and it remains one of the best places to find small beads from the Japanese bead manufacturing company Miyuki. These highly sought after glass beads come in all sorts of shapes, from triangles to droplets to hexagons; find all these and more on Rockin Beads’ Amazon storefront, in seductive colors such as Bisque White, Picasso Canary Yellow, and Amethyst Gold Luster.

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***NEW*** Sterling silver fittingsCalifornia company Adabele specializes in quality jewelry-making supplies, including sterling silver fittings like lobster clasps, jump rings, and earring wires, as well as Swarovski and Preciosa crystal beads. Wholesale orders are welcome.

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Super nice stampsUp your inking game and snag some stamps from SniggleSloth, a hobby store based in Gold River, California. While it sells buttons, stencils, and other charming knickknacks, it’s best known for its rubber stamps, which are made with sturdy wood and deeply etched rubber. A cushion of foam in between makes for satisfyingly springy stamping. While you can purchase traditional, square-shaped stamps, we think the tall ones with sloth faces make for pretty cute desk accessories. Most stamps come in multiple sizes.

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***NEW*** Bold beadsBased in Santa Monica, California, The Bead Chest imports beads and handicrafts from Africa, Nepal, and other parts of the world. If you are looking for, say, vintage Czech snake beads from Nigeria or vinyl beads from Ghana, this is the place.

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***NEW*** Craft chipboardThunderbolt Paper carries papers of all sorts, but we are particularly enamored of their 5-by-7-inch, Kraft paper-colored cards and envelopes and their range of chipboard panels for crafting and bookbinding.

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Peruvian alpaca woolProducts from Alpaca Warehouse travel from Peruvian artisans to the family-run brand’s operations in Gainesville, Florida, which originally got up and running with a shop right in Lima. Now is the time to stock up on its yarn, which is available in different weights and plenty of colors. A bestseller is its fingering yarn, sold in attractive hues from rose pink to emerald green.

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