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New fleet needed: Marines could go to war on small carriers, commercial vessels

Changes in how the Navy and Marine Corps fight together could see Marines aboard both military and commercial ships as they traverse crowded seas, accompanied by small aircraft carriers filled with unmanned drones. Both the Marine Corps commandant and his top general at combat development are looking at new ways that Marines and an evolving…

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New fleet needed: Marines could go to war on small carriers, commercial vessels

Changes in how the Navy and Marine Corps fight together could see Marines aboard both military and commercial ships as they traverse crowded seas, accompanied by small aircraft carriers filled with unmanned drones.

Both the Marine Corps commandant and his top general at combat development are looking at new ways that Marines and an evolving Navy fleet will fight in the crowded sea space of future wars.

And at least one analyst called plans by Commandant Gen. David Berger a “once-in-a-generation” change in Marine Corps thinking.

Berger’s planning guidance, released in July, looks to move away from the unfeasible 38-amphib ship goal and instead use a mix of amphib ships, smaller expeditionary sea bases, fast transport ships and even commercial ships to move Marines.

This is all an effort, Berger wrote in an article for the website War On the Rocks, titled “Notes on Designing the Marine Corps of the Future,” for the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard to design its own “cabbage strategy.”

That’s a reference to the Chinese method of enveloping a contested area with a variety of boats, from commercial fishing ships to marine surveillance ships and actual warships that wraps an area in layers, like a cabbage.

That scenario makes conventional warfare and naval deterrence and access much more difficult, creating hazards that have international consequences such as a military vessel colliding with a commercial ship.

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And to meet that challenge, Berger points out, the current forward bases and infrastructure all within range of enemy weapons, are “extremely vulnerable.”

As are the large ships now in service with “large electronic, acoustic, or optical signatures.”

The shift in how Marines would fight from and back to the sea also changes how the Navy could fight.

Vice Adm. James Kilby, who heads war fighting requirements and capabilities, said that traditionally, naval leaders think of how Marines influence the land component of a sea battle, not the sea. But if they can have effects on sea access and deny enemies movement, then he, as a naval commander can think differently about how to employ his ships.

All of which support recent statements from top Marine leadership that the force has to get lighter, work in smaller formations in support of naval operations, said Lt. Gen. Eric Smith, head of the Marine Corps Combat Development Command.

Getting lighter pairs with “lightning carrier” experimentation ― using smaller aircraft carriers that take advantage of the F-35 capabilities. It even calls for an air wing that consists “mostly or entirely of unmanned aerial vehicles.”

Those comments are from a Thursday a U.S. Naval Institute panel, an article by Berger published the same day and a Congressional Research Service report published in November.

The panel featured Smith, Kilby and Ronald O’Rourke, naval affairs specialist for Congressional Research Service.

Drawing on his CRS report, “Navy Force Structure and Shipbuilding Plans: Background and Issues for Congress,” O’Rourke said that combined changes advocated for both force design and managing and training Marines falls somewhere between, “a total house cleaning and a complete revolution for the Marine Corps.”

O’Rourke noted that the long-held goal of a 38-ship amphibious force within the larger 355-ship Navy was to meet the requirement to lift assault echelons of two Marine Expeditionary Brigades. That requirement dates to 2006.

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Desert Storm group makes final funding push to begin construction

Desert Storm Vets Get National Memorial The National Desert Storm and Desert Shield Memorial will be built near the Lincoln and Vietnam Memorials. It is expected to be built in time for the 30th anniversary of the 1991 Gulf War battles. A nonprofit group that has spearheaded efforts to erect a memorial to Operation Desert…

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Desert Storm group makes final funding push to begin construction

Desert Storm Vets Get National Memorial The National Desert Storm and Desert Shield Memorial will be built near the Lincoln and Vietnam Memorials. It is expected to be built in time for the 30th anniversary of the 1991 Gulf War battles. A nonprofit group that has spearheaded efforts to erect a memorial to Operation Desert Storm a short distance from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial has an ambitious goal to raise the last $20 million of funding so that they may break ground on the project this year, the 30th anniversary of the war. Scott Stump, president and CEO of the National Desert Storm War Memorial Association spoke recently with Military Times, updating the status of the project. Congress authorized construction of the memorial in 2014 and President Barack Obama signed that bill into law shortly afterward. President Donald Trump signed a bill that authorized the memorial to be built near the National Mall in Washington. play_circle_filled In 2018, the National Park Service and National Capital Planning Commission recommended the site, which was approved later that year by the Commission of Fine Arts. In February 2019, the association held a site dedication ceremony for the future memorial. Former Vice President Dick Cheney, who served as defense secretary during the war, spoke at the event, as did retired Air Force Gen. Charles Albert “Chuck” Horner, who commanded U.S. and allied air operations during the war. Gathering interest and support for the memorial actually began in 2010. Though it took much of the next decade to get to this point, much of that was to ensure the memorial would be in a prominent spot, near the Vietnam and Korean War memorials. Sign up for the Early Bird Brief Get the military’s most comprehensive news and information every morning (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Early Bird Brief. The site location plan for The National Desert Storm War Memorial Association memorial to be built near the National Mall in Washington. (NDSWMA) “Given the fact that the maximum number of people would be able to visit this, we felt location was paramount,” Stump said. That meant limiting some of the early design features that may have risen higher than allowed and also navigating a more lengthy approval process due to the location. “We’re not just interested in visibility, but ‘visit-ability,’” Stump said. Along the way, the foundation raised nearly $10 million of the anticipated $40 million price tag, partly through site award money and nearly half through donations by individuals, businesses, foreign governments and Veterans Service Organizations, according to the NDSWMA. The government of Kuwait has pledged $10 million to the project. That leaves an estimated $20 million to be raised before the groundbreaking can take place, according to federal rules, which require funds before construction commences. The National Desert Storm War Memorial Association design concepts for a memorial to be built near the National Mall in Washington. (NDSWMA) Stump said the organization is pursuing various angles and he is confident that they will meet the funding goal. At the same time, they are awaiting final design approval from the National Endowment for the Arts, National Park Service and Commission of Fine Arts. Those are expected to happen this summer, he said. Some of the same entities approved the conceptual design and final site plan in 2019. But the details of the presentation must be reviewed before they can begin building. The design — a stone, sand-colored sweeping left hook around an elevated pool of water — symbolizes the left hook that U.S.-led coalition forces took coming out of Saudi Arabia and then swept into southern Iraq and Kuwait to outflank Iraqi troops. The original design featured raised walls and did not contain a water feature. The final design will include “detailing quotes, fonts, images, bronze sculptures and carvings,” according to an association statement. The memorial design also features the coalition nation names and relief imagery of the conflict and liberation of Kuwait. The sweeping left hook will ascend from the entrance into the center water feature and embedded wall features.

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How bad is DoD’s domestic abuse problem? Unclear, thanks to data gaps, auditors say

Defense officials aren’t able to get a full picture of the level of domestic abuse in the military, because they’re not meeting all the requirements of the law in reporting the incidents, according to a new report from government auditors who conducted a sweeping, 21-month review. While DoD and the services have made strides in…

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How bad is DoD’s domestic abuse problem? Unclear, thanks to data gaps, auditors say

Defense officials aren’t able to get a full picture of the level of domestic abuse in the military, because they’re not meeting all the requirements of the law in reporting the incidents, according to a new report from government auditors who conducted a sweeping, 21-month review. While DoD and the services have made strides in implementing and overseeing prevention and response programs, there are still gaps, according to auditors with the Government Accountability Office, in a report required by Congress released Thursday. There were more than 40,000 incidents of domestic abuse involving service members, spouses or intimate partners in fiscal years 2015 through 2019, according to an analysis of the military services’ data conducted by the GAO. Of those incidents, 74 percent were physical abuse. But those incidents represented only those that met the DoD criteria for domestic abuse. DoD hasn’t collected accurate data for all domestic abuse allegations received, including those that don’t meet the DoD criteria for domestic abuse, as is required by law, the auditors found. And this data give DoD better visibility over actions taken by commanders to address domestic violence. And other research in the report, such as interviews with 68 survivors of domestic abuse, chaplains, legal and others, indicate that some victims have had problems reporting their abuse, and there are some inconsistencies in the installations’ screening of the reports to determine whether they meet DoD’s criteria for domestic abuse. Defense officials agreed with the auditors’ 32 recommendations, and described actions that are under way or planned to improve their prevention, response and oversight. Officials are in the process of revising some family advocacy guidance, that will address some recommendations. In addition, officials agreed to explore other recommendations such as developing a quality assurance process for reporting accurate data; and developing a communications plan to increase awareness of different reporting options and resources for abuse victims. Because they don’t collect data on all domestic abuse allegations, “DoD is unable to assess the scope of alleged abuse and its rate of substantiation,” the auditors stated. DoD hasn’t collected comprehensive data about the number of allegations of domestic violence, which has been required by law since 1999, and data on actions taken by commanders in response to those allegations. Domestic violence is a subcategory of different types of domestic abuse that constitute criminal offenses under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Improving collection of the data “would allow DoD to determine the incidence of domestic violence, the rate that domestic violence allegations received are substantiated for command action, and the number and types of associated actions that are taken,” auditors stated. Sign up for the Early Bird Brief Get the military’s most comprehensive news and information every morning (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Early Bird Brief. Domestic abuse in the military has been a concern among lawmakers and advocates for more than 20 years, and lawmakers have pushed for the military to hold offenders accountable. “Domestic abuse can result in devastating personal consequences and societal costs, and according to DoD is incompatible with military values and reduces mission readiness,” auditors noted. Besides the issues with data collection and reporting, auditors identified gaps in DoD’s and the services’ implementation and oversight of actions in response to reports of domestic abuse; inconsistencies in screening of abuse reports, and gaps in training for key personnel such as commanders and senior enlisted advisers on their responsibilities in responding to these allegations. In their research, conducted from September, 2019 to May, 2021, auditors interviewed 68 domestic abuse survivors; interviewed DoD and service officials, including legal, law enforcement, family advocacy, medical, chaplains and others; analyzed data, policies and guidance; assessed documents from a “nongeneralizable” sample of 20 military installations such memorandums of understanding with local law enforcement officials. They also listened by phone to each service’s Incident Determination Committee process, where each installation determines whether an incident meets DOD’s criteria for domestic abuse—at a total of 12 installations, three per military service. The auditors issued 32 recommendations to DoD and the services to help them “improve their ability to consistently identify instances of abuse and provide available safety measures and resources to servicemembers and families affected by abuse.” Digging into the screening decisions being made about the incidents, GAO auditors found “the military services perform limited monitoring of installation incident-screening decisions, and therefore lack reasonable assurance that all domestic abuse allegations are screened in accordance with DoD policy.” Among the 68 military-affiliated survivors of domestic abuse, the minimum amount of time the abuse had occurred was one year; the longest amount of time being abused was 25 years. Of the 68 survivors, 60 said they had reported the abuse to the military or to civilian law enforcement, and 8 said they had not reported the abuse to the military or to civilian law enforcement. Other findings: • 59 survivors said they experienced barriers to reporting the abuse. The most common barriers cited were being dependent on the abuser for financial resources; feeling their report wouldn’t be believed or taken seriously; concern about the impact to the abuser’s career; and fearing retaliation from the abuser. • Asked about their motivation for reporting the abuse, the most common reasons the victims cited were protecting their children, fear for their own safety, and escalating abuse. • 8 of the 68 survivors interviewed said they tried to report the abuse, but believed no action was taken. Some survivors described feeling ignored or not taken seriously, or that the person they reported the incident to tried to defend the actions of their abuser. In some cases, survivors described negative actions that resulted from these attempts to report, such as being ridiculed by members of their abuser’s command or unit. • The survivors described a range of responses to their reports of domestic abuse from the command, including senior enlisted advisers. Some survivors described positive actions, such as issuing a protective order or taking disciplinary action against the alleged abuser, while others said the command took no action, or took an action that was negative for the survivor or positive for the alleged abuser. • Chaplains have varying degrees of training in responding to domestic abuse, and the survivors described a wide variety of responses. For example, one survivor said a chaplain provided commissary gift cards to ease the financial burden, and another said the chaplain helped keep the abuser out of the house while the survivor prepared to leave. But another survivor reported being deterred from reporting the abuse to others because of the chaplain’s lack of action or support. One chaplain advised “thinking hard before reporting abuse, because of the potential effect on the service member’s career,” the auditors reported. Chaplains also reported varying degrees of confidence in their family advocacy program. “Chaplains at one installation told us they would hesitate to refer a victim to FAP because they are not confident FAP services will result in a positive outcome,” the auditors wrote. “Similarly, although some chaplains stated they would share information about FAP and encourage victims to self-refer, others stated they had more confidence referring servicemembers to other resources, such as financial education or substance abuse counseling.” The auditors recommended that DoD take steps to specify learning objectives or content requirements for chaplain training on domestic abuse. Defense officials will look at the feasibility of coordinating with the military departments’ chaplain corps to do this, according to the DoD response. Among other recommendations: • DoD should take steps to improve the guidance and process for submitting reports on domestic abuse allegations, including those that don’t meet DoD’s criteria for abuse, and expand the analysis of those allegations; • DoD should evaluate responsibilities for tracking domestic violence and related actions by commanders; • The services should take steps to make sure regulations are clear: that violation of civilian protective orders is punishable under the UCMJ; • The services should develop a process to consistently monitor how the allegations of domestic abuse are screened at installations; • The services should provide additional guidance or sample training materials for installation-level commander and senior enlisted adviser domestic abuse training. • The services should take steps to develop a process for installation family advocacy offices to enter into memorandums of understanding with local civilian authorities regarding investigating reports of domestic abuse.

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Marine grunts are getting new night vision, helmets, vehicles, tropical uniforms and boots

The core infantry gear upgrades are nearly complete across the force and new night vision, a high-cut helmet, new tropical uniforms and boots are soon to follow. That’s according to a recent update provided to media by Brig. Gen. A.J. Pasagian, head of Marine Corps Systems Command, on Thursday. Officials see the new kit, which…

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Marine grunts are getting new night vision, helmets, vehicles, tropical uniforms and boots

The core infantry gear upgrades are nearly complete across the force and new night vision, a high-cut helmet, new tropical uniforms and boots are soon to follow. That’s according to a recent update provided to media by Brig. Gen. A.J. Pasagian, head of Marine Corps Systems Command, on Thursday. Officials see the new kit, which does everything from improving shooter accuracy, night vision to body armor protection, vehicle mobility and basic comfort, as more than simply giving grunts better gear. As the Corps restructures itself for a new kind of warfare, small teams separated on distant beachheads to thwart an adversary’s Navy, it is experimenting and war gaming both in exercises and simulations, the best way to meet those challenges. Pasagian said that his command will be working closely with each of the three battalions, one per active duty division, as they experiment with new concepts and tactics. The Corps is also upgrading its ranges at places such at Twentynine Palms, California, to better collect data on how Marines are performing in the field. Combining that data with new gear can show its effectiveness in making Marines more lethal and survivable. Get the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup Don’t miss the top Marine Corps stories, delivered each afternoon (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup. “I can then present that to the new Marine Corps Wargaming Center for analysis,” he said. That means that planners can take data from the squad level up, aggregate the results and measure performance of actual Marines in field scenarios, rather than just statistical representations of how Marine might behave in a war game. The Marines are nearly finished fielding the squad binocular night vision goggle. It is a separate effort from the Army’s enhanced Night Vision Goggle-Binocular. Both devices are binocular, providing real depth perception not previously available with monocular devices. The SBNVG was pursued by the Marine starting in 2018 to field that capability to the fleet faster. Though Pasagian noted that the Marines are monitoring the Army ENVG-B work, which began fielding in 2019. The SBNVG has an external thermal clip. The ENVG-B has those features built into the device and also can work on a network to share data and provide a common operational picture. The new Marine Corps tropical uniform has concluded its testing and begun shipments to units. That will go to units in those climates, primarily the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. A new tropical boot for the same Marines is expected to be fully fielded by 2022. The command continues to work on a high-cut version of the enhanced combat helmet, or ECH, which is already in use by troops with U.S. Special Operations Command. The higher cut allows for the use of networked communications and hearing protection devices. Officials also expect the ultra light tactical vehicle fleet to be fielded by late 2022, Pasagian said. “That’s really a tremendous utility vehicle that allows you to conduct all sorts of mission role variations, whether logistics carrying ammo, heavy class four stuff, concertina wire,” he said. “We’re also kitting it out with really advanced data networks and data routers.” The vehicle would replace the existing Polaris MRZR all-terrain tactical vehicle but have similar characteristics. Shooters are now seeing new optics arriving at their units. The Corps announced fielding of the squad common optic in February. It will replace the existing rifle combat optic. The SCO is a magnified day optic that has both an illuminated and nonilluminated aim point that’s built to increase effective target acquisition and probability of hit, according to a Marine statement. The new scope weighs 31.5 ounces and is 10.5 inches long ― making it nearly double the size of the nearly 6-inch and 10 ounce RCO. But with that size Marines are able to double their magnification, from the current four times magnification of the RCO to eight times with the SCO. The Marines have also fielded a Generation III Plate Carrier for body armor. The new design offers fragmentation, projectile and rifle round protection with better fit and function, the one-star said.

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