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Veterans Day beginning to look a lot like Christmas as cold sweeps nation; freeze coming to Florida

CLOSE Bundle up! The National Weather Service predicts that more than 250 new cold records could be tied or set during the first half of the week. AccuweatherA wintry weather pattern that brought single-digit temperatures and more than a foot of snow to parts of the Upper Midwest rolled across a wide swath of the nation Monday,…

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Veterans Day beginning to look a lot like Christmas as cold sweeps nation; freeze coming to Florida

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Bundle up! The National Weather Service predicts that more than 250 new cold records could be tied or set during the first half of the week.
AccuweatherA wintry weather pattern that brought single-digit temperatures and more than a foot of snow to parts of the Upper Midwest rolled across a wide swath of the nation Monday, threatening to break hundreds of records and bring a deep freeze as far south as Florida.”The coldest surge of arctic air so far this season will bring widespread record low temperatures for much of the central and eastern U.S. even down to the Gulf Coast,” said Kwan-Yin Kong, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center.More than 300 daily records could fall through Thursday, the weather service said. Houston’s record low for Tuesday, 29 degrees, was set 113 years ago. The forecast for Tuesday called for 27 degrees. Nashville’s record of 18 degrees for Tuesday, set in 1911, was imperiled by a forecast of 16 degrees.AccuWeather meteorologist Tyler Roys said many forecasts call for breaking records by just a degree or two, so it was not clear how many would actually fall.”The total will be closer to hundreds of records than a handful,” Roys told USA TODAY. “In some places we will smash them, in others we will tie them, in other places we might just fall short. But it will be cold.”Commuters walk in the snow as a winter weather advisory is issued for the Chicago area on Monday, Nov. 11, 2019, in Chicago (Photo: Rich Hein, AP)The cold will dip deep into the South. A freeze watch was in effect for Pensacola, Florida, where temperatures were forecast to dip below freezing Tuesday night and Wednesday morning. Crestview, north of Fort Walton Beach, could see 26 degrees, Roys said. It was 77 on Monday.Low temperatures in parts of Alabama might barely make it to the teens. “It’s going to be cold and breezy through the rest of Tuesday. Make sure you’re ready for the ~30 degree temperature drop!” the weather service in Birmingham tweeted. “Nighttime lows will be in the low-mid 20s with some pockets of upper 10s.”In Oklahoma, freezing temperatures and freezing rain normally reserved for the middle of winter made their debut more than two weeks before Thanksgiving. Tulsa’s 101st Veterans Day Parade was an adventure. Thousands lined the streets despite temperatures in the 20s and strong winds. Freezing rain greeted early arrivals.”Veterans Day Parade 2019 is in the books,” spectator Brandon Thompson tweeted. “We’re slowly thawing out.” AutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideParts of Texas could drop to 16 degrees. Cities in Texas and Louisiana were predicted to reach highs in the mid-40s, breaking long-standing records.The high Tuesday in Dallas is forecast for 44 degrees – 24 degrees below average for the date. By Tuesday night, Dallas is forecast for a low of 22 degrees. The record low for the date is 21 degrees.Monday’s high in Brownsville, Texas, was forecast for 86 degrees – more than double Tuesday’s forecast high of 42 degrees.’They’re like children’: How to keep pets safe amid record-breaking coldBy Wednesday, the coldest temperatures will drift east. Cities from Boston to Washington will challenge record lows for the date.Snow will add to the wintry feel across the interior Northeast on Tuesday and Wednesday.”We expect a swath of higher snowfall totals from central New York to northern Maine, where accumulations could climb into the double digits,” AccuWeather meteorologist Courtney Travis said.No more fire in the kitchen: Cities ban natural gas in homes to save planetThe Upper Midwest was in the thick of it Monday. Parts of Michigan were overwhelmed with more than a foot of snow Monday. Areas of Michigan and Indiana could see 2 feet or more before the snow ends, AccuWeather said.It snowed Monday in Chicago; temperatures were in the 20s, and wind gusts hit 30 mph. The city opened a warming center.”Chicagoans are advised to take precautions due to low temperatures and winter weather, whether you’re on the road or going for a walk,” Mayor Lori Lightfoot warned.AutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideRead or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/11/11/veterans-day-weather-snow-record-breaking-cold-sweep-nation/2560318001/
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RCMP mask policy for bearded front-line officers ‘must be rectified’: Ottawa | CBC News

The RCMP is facing accusations of discrimination because of a policy requiring front-line officers to wear properly fitting, medical-grade face masks — something that might not be possible with a beard. Calls for a change in policy arose after some front-line officers with beards — including Sikh and Muslim RCMP members who leave their hair unshorn for religious reasons — were reassigned to desk…

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RCMP mask policy for bearded front-line officers ‘must be rectified’: Ottawa | CBC News

The RCMP is facing accusations of discrimination because of a policy requiring front-line officers to wear properly fitting, medical-grade face masks — something that might not be possible with a beard. Calls for a change in policy arose after some front-line officers with beards — including Sikh and Muslim RCMP members who leave their hair unshorn for religious reasons — were reassigned to desk duties over the mask issue.On March 19, as Canada began dealing with the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki sent out a directive outlining the use of respirator masks for front-line officers. Lucki said officers must ensure the respirator is sealed correctly and “one of the most common causes of a breached seal is facial hair.” World Sikh Organization legal counsel Balpreet Singh said Thursday the move has resulted in some Sikh officers being removed from their front-line duties during the pandemic. “It’s clearly a case of discrimination in that once again, Sikh officers are able to serve in the Canadian forces, were able to serve in different police forces and there’s been really no issue. The fact that this has been allowed to linger for almost six months without a resolution. To me, it points to a larger issue of not understanding the need to accommodate.” Singh said his organization wrote to Lucki and Public Safety Minister Bill Blair asking them to resolve the issue. Blair’s office condemned the policy in a statement to CBC News on Friday. “All officers must be given equal opportunity to serve their community while practicing their faith. They must not experience discrimination based on religion,” read an email from the minister’s spokesperson. “The reports from the World Sikh Organization are concerning,” the email said. “It is essential for the RCMP to provide necessary personal protective equipment in a timely manner for Sikh officers. We have raised this matter with the RCMP, and expect that this be rectified as quickly as possible.” Vancouver Police spokesperson Const. Tania Visintin said the department does not have a policy similar to RCMP and is consulting medical experts to find a way for members with beards to be safe while working. Other masks available B.C.’s Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry was asked about the issue Thursday and said N95-type respirator masks aren’t needed for most law enforcement.  “I believe there are very few cases where a police officer would need to wear a respirator. For the most part, they are not involved in resuscitating people and there are many other types of masks that can be used safely for other types of activities that police officers are involved in.” Henry said respirator masks should be worn when someone is providing care for someone who has a respiratory illness like tuberculosis or COVID-19, or during an invasive medical procedure such as intubation. WATCH | Bonnie Henry on police wearing masks:  B.C.’s chief health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says there are “few cases” where a police officer would need to wear a respirator mask. 0:50 Federal policy dictates rules However, the RCMP says it is different from other police forces because it is bound by the Canada Labour Code and Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, which require a clean-shaven face for proper use of N95 masks. Cpl. Caroline Duval with RCMP National Communications Services said in a statement that under current legislation, the force does not have the authority to change the rules around personal protective equipment (PPE).  “Unfortunately, there is presently no evidence of a safe and proven alternative to the currently approved PPE that meets the unique uncontrolled setting in which our front-line members operate and that adheres to occupational health and safety regulations.” The National Police Federation (NPF), which represents 20,000 RCMP members across the country, said the force’s directive is “unnecessarily broad and contrary to the RCMP’s human rights obligations.” The NPF said it is advocating for a new policy that allows individual members to be assessed for front-line duties. A clean-shaven RCMP officer is pictured wearing a respirator mask and directing traffic at a COVID-19 testing centre in Burnaby, B.C., in August. (Ben Nelms/CBC) Retired officer wants resolution Retired RCMP Insp. Baltej Singh Dhillon, who served nearly 30 years and became the first RCMP officer to wear a turban, said he disagrees with the force’s “blanket policy” because it discriminates against one group of police officers. He said calls to police are often assessed for risk so officers who wouldn’t be able to meet the standard for a fitted respiratory masks could go to a different call and still serve on the front line. “Clearly, the PPE is for that time where a police officer feels that he or she is in a higher-risk situation where they may be exposed to COVID-19,” said Dhillon. “Because I think you can generally see that RCMP officers are currently working in our communities, not wearing masks the moment they leave the detachment.”  
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Breonna Taylor’s family, attorney demand to see grand jury transcripts | CBC News

Breonna Taylor’s family and their lawyers sharply criticized Kentucky’s attorney general for the failure to bring charges against police officers in her death, calling Friday for him to release the transcripts of the grand jury proceeding while vowing to continue their protests until the officers are charged. Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, said in a statement read…

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Breonna Taylor’s family, attorney demand to see grand jury transcripts | CBC News

Breonna Taylor’s family and their lawyers sharply criticized Kentucky’s attorney general for the failure to bring charges against police officers in her death, calling Friday for him to release the transcripts of the grand jury proceeding while vowing to continue their protests until the officers are charged. Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, said in a statement read by a relative to a gathering in Louisville, Ky., that she did not expect justice from Attorney General Daniel Cameron.Ben Crump, a lawyer for the family, urged the prosecutor to make the transcripts public, so people can see if anyone was present at the grand jury proceedings to give a voice to Taylor. Gov. Andy Beshear, a Democrat, has also called for Cameron to release what evidence he can. Taylor, a Black woman who was an emergency medical worker, was shot multiple times by white officers after her boyfriend fired at them, authorities said. He said he didn’t know who was coming in and opened fire in self-defence, wounding one officer. Police entered on a warrant connected to a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside. Cameron said Wednesday that the investigation showed officers acted in self-defence. The grand jury brought three counts of wanton endangerment against fired Officer Brett Hankison for shooting into Taylor’s neighbour’s home. LISTEN | ‘Breonna Taylor’s killing was an institutional one’: Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron on Wednesday said there would be no charges against Louisville police officers for the killing of Breonna Taylor back in March. Only one of three men involved, who has since been fired from the force, was indicted, and faces three counts of “wanton endangerment” for shooting into Taylor’s neighbour’s home. After the grand jury decision was released, protests erupted in Louisville. Today, host Josh Bloch talks to USA Today politics reporter Phillip M. Bailey about the implications of the grand jury decision, and why Taylor’s name continues to be a rallying cry for those fighting against police brutality in the U.S. 21:02 Protests have taken place locally since Taylor’s shooting death in March, growing nationally after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis occurred in May. The FBI is still investigating whether Taylor’s civil rights were violated. But the burden of proof for such cases is very high, with prosecutors having to prove officers knew they were acting illegally and made a willful decision to cause someone’s death. City settled civil suit Since Taylor’s killing, Louisville has taken some steps to address protesters’ concerns. In addition to the officer who was fired and later charged, three others were put on desk duty. Officials have banned no-knock warrants and hired a Black woman as the permanent police chief — a first for the city. Louisville also agreed to more police reforms as it settled a lawsuit that included $12 million for Taylor’s family. But many have expressed frustration that more has not been done. WATCH | Anger, frustration after grand jury decision: One police officer has been charged over the raid that led to the death of Kentucky woman Breonna Taylor in March, but he wasn’t charged for her death. Brett Hankison was charged with ‘wanton endangerment’ for firing into a neighbour’s apartment. 2:03 Meanwhile, a not guilty plea was entered Friday morning for a man charged with shooting and wounding two police officers in Louisville during protests over Taylor’s death. Larynzo Johnson, 26, appeared in an orange jumpsuit Friday morning and only spoke when the judge asked if he understood the charges. He replied that he did. Bond was set at $1 million US, and the judge appointed a public defender to represent Johnson at his next court date set for Oct. 5. According to police, at least 24 people were arrested as of 1 a.m. Friday in a second night of protests after Cameron made the announcement. Authorities alleged the protesters broke windows at a restaurant, damaged city buses, tried to set a fire and threw a flare into the street. Earlier, it got heated between some protesters and a group of 12 to 15 armed white people wearing military-style uniforms, but it didn’t turn physical. A curfew will last through the weekend, and the governor called up the National Guard for “limited missions.”
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Investors who profited from Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme must return earnings: judge | CBC News

WorldInvestors who profited from Bernard Madoff’s massive Ponzi scheme even though they knew nothing of it must still pay back their profits, an appeals court decided Thursday.Judge rules the money — even if earned innocently — belonged to other peopleThe Associated Press · Posted: Sep 24, 2020 7:17 PM ET | Last Updated: September 25A…

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Investors who profited from Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme must return earnings: judge | CBC News

WorldInvestors who profited from Bernard Madoff’s massive Ponzi scheme even though they knew nothing of it must still pay back their profits, an appeals court decided Thursday.Judge rules the money — even if earned innocently — belonged to other peopleThe Associated Press · Posted: Sep 24, 2020 7:17 PM ET | Last Updated: September 25A judge has ruled that investors who profited off of the Ponzi scheme run by Bernie Madoff, seen here in 2009, must return the profits. (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)Investors who profited from Bernard Madoff’s massive Ponzi scheme even though they knew nothing of it must still pay back their profits, an appeals court decided Thursday. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan upheld lower-court decisions in cases filed by Irving Picard, a court-appointed trustee who has recovered money for cheated investors for over a decade.Madoff, 82, is serving a 150-year prison sentence imposed after he pleaded guilty to federal charges in 2009. His bid to be released early on grounds that he is dying was rejected this year. Thousands of investors lost billions of dollars through his multi-decade fraud. Madoff customers who received millions of dollars more than their original investments fought in court to hang on to their profits, arguing through their lawyers that they had received the payouts in good faith and that too much time had passed to let Picard recover the money. A three-judge panel of the 2nd Circuit concluded, however, that the investors were not entitled to “fictitious” profits that actually was money belonging to other customers. It noted that the investors were permitted to retain the principal of their investments. Picard has reported recovering over $14.3 billion US for investors who lost over $17.5 billion US that they invested. The collapse of the Ponzi scheme left many investors severely damaged financially because they were told their investments had grown much larger than what they started with.
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