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Eagles slam door on Aaron Rodgers late, end Packers’ perfect start to season

CLOSE Nigel Bradham on his game-saving interception, and Jordan Howard on the Eagles’ strong running game. Martin Frank, The News JournalGREEN BAY, Wisc. – The Eagles were desperate, knowing they needed something, anything in the final seconds to hold off the Green Bay Packers.They had already lost three of their top four cornerbacks after Avonte Maddox…

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Eagles slam door on Aaron Rodgers late, end Packers’ perfect start to season

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Nigel Bradham on his game-saving interception, and Jordan Howard on the Eagles’ strong running game.
Martin Frank, The News JournalGREEN BAY, Wisc. – The Eagles were desperate, knowing they needed something, anything in the final seconds to hold off the Green Bay Packers.They had already lost three of their top four cornerbacks after Avonte Maddox was taken off the field on a stretcher just two plays earlier after a vicious hit from teammate Andrew Sendejo as both players were trying to break up a pass near the goal line.And there was Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, already with 422 yards passing and just three yards away from a game-tying touchdown, poised to steal the night away from the Eagles.Rodgers dropped back and fired for Marquez Valdes-Scantling in the end zone. But cornerback Craig James, playing his second snap of the night after replacing Maddox, got his hands on the ball and popped it into the air.Nigel Bradham intercepted the ball with 20 seconds left, preserving the Eagles’ scintillating 34-27 win. The Eagles improved to 2-2 by beating the undefeated Packers at Lambeau Field.”I’d seen (the ball) go up, and I’m like, ‘I gotta go get it,'” Bradham said. “Craig was playing great coverage. He was able to get his hands on the ball.”This win said said so much about the Eagles. At first, it looked like it was going to be a disastrous night. The Eagles had fallen behind by 10 points in the second quarter before clawing their way back in. Then they went back and forth with the Packers up until the final, frantic seconds.Twice in the fourth quarter, they prevented the Packers from scoring when Green Bay was inside the 10 yard line. The first time, the Eagles stopped the Packers after they had a 1st-and-goal from the 1.Curiously, the Packers tried four straight passes, all of them falling incomplete.”Resilient, resilient team,” Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz said. “Unfortunately, we’ve been plagued with some injuries on both sides of the ball … Resilient bunch. That’s kind of what we knew. We knew we had a lot of depth and ability, but the resiliency was good to see.”The Eagles knew they had to have the game, too, or else they would have faced a 1-3 record at the season’s quarter mark.”It’s huge,” Wentz said. “The difference between going 2-2 and 1-3 is huge in this league, especially for us on the road, short week, coming in here. That’s big for our confidence, for sure.”The Eagles’ offense had to go toe to toe with Rodgers and the Packers in order to do it. They did so, but in a different way.Instead of relying on Wentz’s arm, they did it behind a running game that racked up 176 yards. Jordan Howard had 87 yards rushing and 2 touchdowns rushing. He also had a 20-yard TD reception.Rookie Miles Sanders added 72 yards on 11 carries.”He brings the power and I kind of bring the speed,” Sanders said. Then he added: “We wanted to pound the ball the whole game. That was the mentality the whole game … We knew they struggled with the rushing game, so we knew from the jump that we were going to come in and pound the ball.”Wentz orchestrated everything. He completed 16 of 27 passes for only 160 yards. But he threw three touchdown passes and had a passer rating of 113.2.The Eagles needed all of it.In addition to Maddox, cornerback Sidney Jones left the game in the second quarter and didn’t return. Ronald Darby injured his hamstring against the Lions and didn’t suit up. But Maddox’s injury was the most unnerving. He took a brutal hit to the helmet by teammate Andrew Sendejo as the Packers got to the Eagles’ 7 yard line with 1:06 remaining.Maddox was down on the ground for several minutes before getting lifted onto a stretcher with the entire Eagles team standing nearby for support.Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins said Maddox was moving his hands and feet and laughing on the stretcher.Maddox was taken to a local hospital for observation after the game. There was no word on his condition.Long before that injury, the Eagles had to overcome so much, beginning with Rodgers and wide receiver Davante Adams, who finished with 10 catches for 180 yards, with 107 of those yards coming in the first quarter alone.Quickly, the Eagles were down 10-0, the fourth straight game in which they trailed by double digits.Slowly, they started coming back. Sanders’ 67-yard kickoff return enabled the Eagles to start at the Packers’ 34, and Wentz hit Alshon Jeffery for a 6-yard TD. Then the Eagles took the lead after Wentz’s 3-yard TD pass to Dallas Goedert.Derek Barnett added a strip-sack with 1:53 left in the first half that Brandon Graham recovered. That gave the Eagles the ball at Green Bay’s 17 yard line. It was just the third sack for the Eagles this season and first by a defensive end.Howard capped that drive with a 1-yard run with 59 seconds left for a 21-13 lead.But Rodgers doesn’t need much time as he moved the Pack down the field, completing a pass for 31 yards to Geronimo Allison to the Eagles’ 19 with 17 seconds left. He then hit Allison again for the TD with 9 seconds left.Still, the Eagles had a 21-20 lead at halftime. They made it 27-20 on Wentz’s 20-yard TD pass to Howard.Green Bay came right back on Rodgers’ 14-yard TD pass to Jimmy Graham before the Eagles retook the lead on Howard’s 2-yard run.Then they held on for dear life.”We just fought hard,” Graham said. “We stayed together … We could have wavered so many times, but we didn’t. We went out there and we hung together.”Not much disciplineThe Eagles had four 15-yard penalties on Thursday, and the first two were especially costly.On Green Bay’s first play from scrimmage from its own 11 yard line, Rodgers threw a short pass to Jamaal Williams who was stopped for no gain. That’s when Derek Barnett came in helmet first and knocked Williams to the ground, where he remained for several minutes.LOCAL STAR: Delaware native Darnell Savage shines on Green Bay Packers defense as a rookieLinebacker Zach Brown was called for unnecessary roughness on the Packers’ next drive, again giving Green Bay a first down after being pinned deep in its own territory.Williams was wheeled off on a stretcher with head and neck injuries. The Packers announced that he had movement in all of his extremities.Still, instead of 2nd-and-long deep in its own territory, the Packers had a first down at the 26. And Rodgers immediately took advantage, hitting Adams over Jones for 58 yards down to the Eagles’ 7. The Packers scored two plays later. ROUGH START: Growing pains for rookies Miles Sanders, J.J. Arcega-Whiteside hurting Eagles, for nowGreen Bay ended up with a field goal.Rodney McLeod and Brown each had 15-yard penalties in the second half.AutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideAlex Ellis blocks for another TDAlex Ellis, the Delmar High School graduate, might only get a few snaps in a game, but he has made them count.He was put in as an extra blocker near the goal line for the second straight game. Each time, the Eagles scored a touchdown. Ellis was the lead blocker for Jordan Howard’s 1-yard TD run on Thursday. He was also the lead blocker for Howard on a 1-yard TD run against the Lions last Sunday.TRESOLINI COLUMN: How did catching the football become such a hard task for Eagles?Eagles inactivesDarby was not on the active roster for the game. The other inactives were WR DeSean Jackson (abdomen), DT Tim Jernigan (foot), QB Nate Sudfeld, G Matt Pryor, C Nate Herbig and DE Shareef Miller.Contact Martin Frank at [email protected] Follow on Twitter @Mfranknfl.
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Hong Kong’s new rules have created confusion in the classroom. Some parents are pulling their children out

“I want him to grow up in an environment with enough freedom to do what he wants to do and not be restricted by some invisible threat,” said Sarah, who requested CNN use a pseudonym for fear of being targeted by authorities.In June, Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong that bans secession,…

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Hong Kong’s new rules have created confusion in the classroom. Some parents are pulling their children out

“I want him to grow up in an environment with enough freedom to do what he wants to do and not be restricted by some invisible threat,” said Sarah, who requested CNN use a pseudonym for fear of being targeted by authorities.In June, Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong that bans secession, subversion, terrorist activities and collusion with foreign powers. The law was passed to quell the pro-democracy movement that destabilized the financial hub last year, but its reach went far beyond policing protests to criminalizing certain conversations, political positions, publications and even social media posts.In Hong Kong’s classrooms, it is now unclear what can legally be taught or discussed.The Education Bureau has ordered schools to remove books and teaching materials that could violate the law. Administrators can call the police if someone insults the Chinese anthem, which must be played in schools on certain holidays. In September, a student who displayed a photo with the slogan “Free Hong Kong, Revolution Now” during class was suspended for a week. Sarah’s move isn’t just for her son: she is a teacher in Hong Kong. The English Schools Foundation, an international education organization, released new guidelines in September for teachers, seen by CNN, which concluded that the classroom “is not a safe space” for discussion or debate. It advised teachers to “always be aware of how what you are teaching could be interpreted/misinterpreted by others.” The former Chief Executive of Hong Kong has even posted on his Facebook page personal details of teachers charged over professional misconduct during the protest last year. In Hong Kong, Sarah owns an apartment and a car — both rare privileges in a city where buying a home is expensive and taking public transport is the norm. But she’s prepared to give it all up for an uncertain life away from family and friends. “We will do any kind of job. Be a cleaner, do the dishes, be a cashier,” she said. “Because it’s the value we place on the freedom that’s more important than the materialistic life we have.”CNN spoke to several parents who said they were also preparing to move abroad for their children’s education, and teachers at some schools have reported a higher than normal drop-out rate this year. One mother, who has two children in local primary schools, said her family will move to the UK before the end of the year. Like Sarah, she isn’t sure what her job prospects will be in a country that’s struggling to cope with a rapid rise in coronavirus cases.”We are sacrificing a lot to move. It will be expensive,” she said. “We want our children to study in a country that offers more freedom.””Illegal ideas” Last month, Hong Kong authorities took away a teacher’s registration for life for allegedly “spreading the idea of Hong Kong independence” in class. Authorities did not give details about the classroom discussion, but local media reported that the teacher showed students a TV documentary, featuring pro-independence figure Andy Chan. They were then asked to answer questions from a worksheet about freedom of speech and proposals for Hong Kong independence. In response to the incident, Chief Executive Carrie Lam said “illegal ideas” and “pro-independence” concepts cannot exist in schools. Beijing has long blamed the Hong Kong education system for radicalizing its students. In particular, pro-Beijing lawmakers condemn Liberal Studies — a required high school civics course that was introduced in 2009 to strengthen critical thinking and knowledge of contemporary issues. It covers topics including modern China, political participation and Hong Kong identity. Pro-Beijing voices have criticized the course materials for being biased and encouraging students to join anti-government protests. Publishers of textbooks for the course have rewritten parts of it, removing criticism of the Chinese government and the term “separation of powers.” Pro-Beijing lawmaker Regina Ip says the changes to education will teach students a more balanced history of China, rather than stifle conversation. “The basic purpose is to bring up our children to at least have proper respect for our country,” Ip said. “I have received complaints about teachers using the classroom as a vehicle of the political beliefs, even stirring up hatred of police, of the Chinese government, of the people of China, portraying them as dirty, backward, repressive.”Education authorities received 247 misconduct complaints about teachers who allegedly “disseminated hate remarks” and “advocated violence on social media,” from last June to this August. Earlier this month, the Hong Kong education minister said his department had investigated several teachers and students for allegedly bullying the children of police officers, who were on the frontlines of last year’s protests. According to local media reports, a secondary school teacher’s contract was terminated because she allowed students to perform pro-democracy anthem “Glory to Hong Kong.” According to Ip, the song “amounts to sowing the seeds of Hong Kong independence in young minds.” This summer, the city’s Education Bureau issued new guidelines, requiring Hong Kong schools to play the Chinese anthem during important holidays, and to report to the police those who insult the song. Ip says “many countries” teach their kids to memorize the constitution and sing the national anthem. “I think there is no basic difference,” she added.For years, Beijing has tried to impose patriotic education in Hong Kong. Joshua Wong, a prominent Hong Kong activist and former leader of the 2014 Umbrella Movement, created a student activist group called Scholarism when he was in high school. In 2012, he rallied 120,000 people to occupy the Hong Kong government’s headquarters to protest a Beijing-backed plan to introduce patriotic, pro-Communist national and moral education lessons in the city’s public schools. Protesters argued the changes amounted to brainwashing, and their actions forced the city’s beleaguered leaders to withdraw the proposed curriculum.That was the last time the students of Hong Kong won against Beijing.Since 2012, one of Beijing’s primary aims has been to create a generation of patriotic and loyal Hong Kong youth, according to Lester Shum, onetime deputy secretary-general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students and now an elected lawmaker. He said the current changes could create a new generation who will be “totally brainwashed, not knowing about the wrongdoings from the authorities.”But Shum says it’s unclear how successful those aims will be, since students can still access free information from the internet and the press. Next generationRowena He, an associate professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has witnessed these types of changes to an education system play out before. In the spring of 1989, millions took to the streets in Beijing and other cities across China to demand political reforms. The nationwide movement ended on June 4, when the People’s Liberation Army opened fire on its own people Beijing’s city center. After that, the Communist Party launched a patriotic education campaign to instil national pride and change young people’s attitudes towards Western powers. Today, few young people within mainland China know about the Tiananmen massacre, or pro-democracy protests, because the event is censored from the Chinese internet and books, and is not taught in schools. Many of those who know about the incident believe in the official version that the crackdown was necessary for China’s stability and rise. But in Hong Kong it will take far longer to “brainwash the younger generation,” He said. “Hong Kong has a strong civil society,” she explained.He is the author of “Tiananmen Exiles: Voices of the Struggle for Democracy in China.” For years, she taught seminars on the movement in American universities before moving to Hong Kong last year. She was looking forward to attending the June 4 commemoration for the first time in Hong Kong, the only place on Chinese soil where an annual vigil is held. But authorities banned the event in June for the first time in 30 years, citing coronavirus concerns. Many fear it will never take place again. A smaller crowd of people still gathered in Victoria Park this year, leading to the arrest of dozens of democracy activists who were accused of knowingly taking part in an “unauthorized assembly.”He still teaches her students about the Tiananmen massacre and historical episodes deemed taboo by the Communist Party, but fears of repercussions have followed her throughout her career. In July, the University of Hong Kong fired Benny Tai, a prominent law professor and pro-democracy activist, who said academic staff in the city “are no longer free to make controversial statements.” Local media have reported instances of professors with pro-democracy views whose contracts have been denied.”We never know what the red line is, that’s the root of censorship and self-censorship,” Rowena He said.On June 4 this year, He took her students to a replica of the “Goddess of Democracy” standing at the heart of the Chinese University campus. The original Goddess of Democracy was a 10-meter tall statue hastily made by students in 1989 that was destroyed by the Chinese military in Tiananmen Square. The figure is now a global symbol of defiance. “Those in power can easily manipulate history and erase memory,” He said. “I try my best to speak out the truth — that’s the resistance.”Some of Rowena’s students plan to leave Hong Kong after graduation. One of them, Tyler, who asked to use a pseudonym to avoid repercussions, said he will move to the UK to pursue graduate studies in Chinese history, because of the “censorship problems” in Hong Kong. “The narrative in Hong Kong and China is quite controlled,” he said. Tyler took part in student demonstrations at the Chinese University of Hong Kong last year, which became the center of violent clashes between police and protesters. Students set up barricades against police who fired tear gas. Protesters were arrested in large numbers. “Under the security law, many of us are afraid of being spied on by police,” Tyler said. “So now we are quite worried, but I still saw a lot of students who are willing to sacrifice themselves.”Some students are determined to stay in Hong Kong. One of Tyler’s classmates plans to become a primary school teacher, so she can keep alive the memory of important events, such as the 1989 crackdown.”We need someone to continue to teach the next generation and continue to tell them what is right and wrong, so not just let them to be brainwashed by the government,” said the student, who didn’t want to be named for fear of being targeted by authorities.But Sarah, the teacher who is moving her family to the UK, does not want to wait to see what happens to the next generation. Her biggest fear isn’t what’s happening in Hong Kong currently, but what could happen in decades to come. By leaving Hong Kong now, she’s hoping her son won’t have to face a difficult decision in the future about whether to abandon the only city he knows.

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Tropical storm forecast to hit storm-ravaged Central America as a hurricane

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Tropical storm forecast to hit storm-ravaged Central America as a hurricane

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