Sikorsky’s new combat rescue helicopter hovers into production - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
Connect with us
[adrotate group="1"]

Military News

Sikorsky’s new combat rescue helicopter hovers into production

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force has given its new combat rescue helicopter the green light to go into production, its manufacturer Lockheed Martin Sikorsky said Tuesday. After four test aircraft performed more than 70 hours of flight tests, the Air Force approved a “Milestone C” decision for Sikorsky’s HH-60W combat rescue helicopter, moving the…

Published

on

Sikorsky’s new combat rescue helicopter hovers into production

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force has given its new combat rescue helicopter the green light to go into production, its manufacturer Lockheed Martin Sikorsky said Tuesday.

After four test aircraft performed more than 70 hours of flight tests, the Air Force approved a “Milestone C” decision for Sikorsky’s HH-60W combat rescue helicopter, moving the program to low-rate initial production.

“We have just successfully gained approval to launch the production of a helicopter that will save the lives of our war fighters and our allies all over the world. This decision begins the transition to this more capable and reliable helicopter to fulfill the Air Force’s mission to leave no one behind,” said Col. Dale White, the Air Force’s program executive officer for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and special operations forces.

The HH-60W derivative of the Black Hawk boasts better defensive systems than the HH-60G Pave Hawk currently used for combat rescue missions. The “Whiskey” model also includes a new fuel system that nearly doubles the capacity of the internal tank, as well as improvements to hover performance, avionics and weapons, Sikorsky stated in a news release.

The Air Force plans to buy 113 HH-60W aircraft. Five helicopters are in production at Sikorsky’s facility in Stratford, Connecticut.

After a first flight in May, the four previously built test aircraft had undergone evaluations at the company’s flight center in West Palm Beach, Florida, which the Air Force used to assess the aircraft’s performance and load-carrying characteristics.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code

Military News

Barracks shooting sends a Camp Lejeune Marine to hospital

A Marine with 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines has been hospitalized after he was shot in the unit’s barracks Thursday evening on Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. “According to medical authorities, the Marine’s injuries are not believed to be life-threatening,” 1st Lt. Daniel Linfante, a spokesman for the 2nd Marine Division said Friday. The Marine, whose named…

Published

on

By

Barracks shooting sends a Camp Lejeune Marine to hospital

A Marine with 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines has been hospitalized after he was shot in the unit’s barracks Thursday evening on Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. “According to medical authorities, the Marine’s injuries are not believed to be life-threatening,” 1st Lt. Daniel Linfante, a spokesman for the 2nd Marine Division said Friday. The Marine, whose named was withheld for privacy reasons, is currently in “stable condition” at the Naval Medical Center, Camp Lejeune, Linfante said. The shooting was first reported by Task and Purpose. The Marines with 3/6 had just returned to the North Carolina from a rotational deployment to Norway. The 2nd Marine Division could not confirm whether the Marines involved in the shooting were conducting their post-deployment quarantine required because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Linfante said the Naval Criminal Investigative Service has launched an investigation into the incident. Get the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup Don’t miss the top Marine Corps stories, delivered each afternoon (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup. “Should the investigation reveal misconduct, we will hold those responsible fully accountable, as such conduct would be inconsistent with the high ideals of the 2d Marine Division and the broader Marine Corps,” Linfante said. The investigative service has not yet responded to requests for comment by Marine Corps Times. Under most circumstances Marines are not allowed to possess firearms in the barracks, but the ban has failed to prevent barracks shootings in the past. In 2019 Cpl. Spencer Daily drunkenly shot and killed his roommate in the face with a pistol he was storing in his truck’s glove box, against Marine Corps regulations. Daily told investigators that he was playing around with the gun when he accidently shot his “friend” and roommate, Cpl. Tyler P. Wallingford. Ultimately Daily was sentenced to 69 months of confinement.

Continue Reading

Military News

Marine general cited for failures in fatal AAV mishap faces scrutiny over his new job as IG

California Democrat Rep. Jackie Speier wants to know how a commander who failed to fully train and equip the nine servicemembers who died in July’s amphibious assault vehicle accident was appointed to the prestigious post of Inspector General of the Marine Corps. Marine Maj. Gen. Robert Castellvi was commander of the 1st Marine Division in…

Published

on

By

Marine general cited for failures in fatal AAV mishap faces scrutiny over his new job as IG

California Democrat Rep. Jackie Speier wants to know how a commander who failed to fully train and equip the nine servicemembers who died in July’s amphibious assault vehicle accident was appointed to the prestigious post of Inspector General of the Marine Corps. Marine Maj. Gen. Robert Castellvi was commander of the 1st Marine Division in 2020 when a platoon of Marines and vehicles he was responsible for training, suffered a catastrophic mishap that killed eight Marines and one sailor. It was was the deadliest AAV training accident in the Corps’ history. The Marine Corps’ eight-month investigation into the deaths found that the Marines were sent on the deployment with defective equipment and without mandatory pre-deployment training like the Marine Corps combat readiness evaluation. The investigation noted that Castellvi, as the division commander, was responsible for ensuring that the Marines were fully prepared for the deployment and he failed to do that. At the time of the fatal accident, the AAV was transporting 15 Marines and one sailor form San Clemente Island, California, to the amphibious transport dock Somerset. Just over two months after the incident, Castellvi was appointed to be the Inspector General of the Marine Corps where he oversees investigations into misconduct, readiness concerns and other institutional problems across the Corps. “I met yesterday with family members of the AAV which you were in charge of,” Speier said Thursday. Get the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup Don’t miss the top Marine Corps stories, delivered each afternoon (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup. “I must say, it’s a very painful thing for all of us, but I don’t quite understand how someone gets elevated to the position of an inspector general after being in charge of that particular disaster,” she said. Speier’s remarks came at the end of a House Armed Services Military Personnel subcommittee hearing where lawmakers talked to the inspectors general of the Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Speier ended the hearing immediately after questioning Castellvi’s new job and she did not allow him to respond. Castellvi, speaking through a Marine Corps spokesman, declined to comment on the lawmaker’s remarks. “Major General Castellvi was best qualified and suited for the assignment,” Capt. Andrew Wood, a spokesman for headquarters Marine Corps, told Marine Corps Times. The initial Marine Corps investigation into the sinking said Castellvi was one of the Marines responsible for the lack of training. But Castellvi’s boss at the time, Lt. Gen. Steven Rudder, commander of Marine Forces Pacific, recommended that Castellvi receive no disciplinary action. Rudder said the Marine Expeditionary Unit could have made up for the training lapses of the Marines and noted that Castellvi, “was not the on-scene commander during the mishap.” The Marine Corps fired at least two commanders for failures that led to the accident and senior leaders are considering more discipline for others involved. The Naval Safety Center has not yet completed its investigation into the sinking, while in early April the Corps launched a third investigation led by Lt. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III, commander of Marine Corps Forces Central Command, that will focus on the training and equipment readiness the occurred in the formation of the MEU. In addition to the Marine Corps investigation, Capitol Hill lawmakers are searching for more answers from the Marine Corps. On May 3, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. David Berger or one of his representatives will testify about the Marine Corps training safety record before the House Armed Services committee. Rep. John Garamendi, a Democrat from California, said that during that hearing he will demand the Marine Corps to “explain in detail how the persons responsible will be held accountable.” “I believe that there’s a significant history where that doesn’t happen,” said Garamendi, who is chairman of the readiness subcommittee.

Continue Reading

Military News

Afghanistan war cost more than $2T and 240,000 lives, report finds

When you add up the cost of Defense and State Department funds sunk into Operations Enduring Freedom and Resolute Support, then throw in the cost of caring for the conflicts’ veterans and the interest on the money borrowed to cover it all, you’re looking at over $2 trillion, according to a report released Friday. The…

Published

on

By

Afghanistan war cost more than $2T and 240,000 lives, report finds

When you add up the cost of Defense and State Department funds sunk into Operations Enduring Freedom and Resolute Support, then throw in the cost of caring for the conflicts’ veterans and the interest on the money borrowed to cover it all, you’re looking at over $2 trillion, according to a report released Friday. The Costs of War Project detailed its most recent estimates, finding that most of the money came out of $933 billion in DoD overseas contingency funding. The rest includes: $443 billion in DoD base budget increases to support the war; $296 billion to care for veterans; $59 billion in State overseas contingency funds; and $530 to cover the interest on the money borrowed to fund 20 years of deployments. Those funds do not, however, include the amount the United States government is obligated to spend on lifetime care for American veterans of this war, nor does it include future interest payments on money borrowed to fund the war. “The DoD spending, at over $900 billion in Afghanistan, is the tip of the iceberg,” Neta Crawford, the project’s lead researcher, said in the release. “The costs of the Afghanistan war include its escalation into Pakistan, millions of refugees and displaced persons, the toll in lives of combatants and non-combatants, and the need to care for America’s veterans.” President Joe Biden announced on Wednesday that the U.S. would begin drawing down its remaining 2,500 troops from Afghanistan on May 1, with a Sept. 11 deadline for full withdrawal. The Costs of War Project also estimates that 241,000 people have died because of the war in Afghanistan, which includes more than 2,400 American service members and least 71,344 civilians; 78,314 Afghan military and police; and 84,191 opposition fighters. These figures do not include deaths caused by disease, loss of access to food, water, infrastructure, and/or other indirect consequences of the war. More than 20,000 U.S. troops have been wounded. Sign up for the Early Bird Brief Get the military’s most comprehensive news and information every morning (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Early Bird Brief. The data is compiled from DoD reporting and budgeting documents starting in 2001. “We report these estimates so that the American people will have a better understanding of the scale of the effort and its consequences,” she added. “The American people also lost some transparency here. A more comprehensive accounting is yet to be completed. It would include not just money that may or may not have been well spent, but the count of those wounded, those who lost limbs, and the tremendous psychological toll of decades of war on combatants and noncombatants and their families.”

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!