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Wi-Fi 6: Better, faster internet is coming — here’s what you need to know – CNET

Look for this logo to identify Wi-Fi 6-certified devices.Wi-Fi 6 is making its big debut this year, but summing up the potential impact is a bit more complicated than saying it will make your Wi-Fi network faster. Yes, things are going to be speedier than before — but beyond basics like speed and range, what’s…

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Wi-Fi 6: Better, faster internet is coming — here’s what you need to know     – CNET

Look for this logo to identify Wi-Fi 6-certified devices.Wi-Fi 6 is making its big debut this year, but summing up the potential impact is a bit more complicated than saying it will make your Wi-Fi network faster. Yes, things are going to be speedier than before — but beyond basics like speed and range, what’s really key about Wi-Fi 6 is how it will reshape the way routers handle the growing number of internet-connected devices in our homes and lives.
If you’re looking for some basic answers about how that’ll work, and perhaps a semi-convoluted comparison or two to help you wrap your head around all of it, then you’ve come to right post.
Let’s start with the basics — what is Wi-Fi 6?
Wi-Fi 6, or 802.11ax if you want to be technical about it, is the newest version of the 802.11 standard for wireless network transmissions that people commonly call Wi-Fi. It’s a backwards-compatible upgrade over the previous version of the Wi-Fi standard, which is called 802.11ac.
Wi-Fi 6 isn’t a new means of connecting to the internet like fiber — rather, it’s an upgraded standard that compatible devices, particularly routers, can take advantage of to transmit Wi-Fi signals more efficiently.
Wi-Fi 6? Did I miss the other 5?
No, the names were just clunky, and more or less meaningless to most people who don’t work with wireless networks for a living. That’s why the Wi-Fi Alliance, the non-profit industry group that helps maintain and certify Wi-Fi devices, is now transitioning to a simpler, more user-friendly way of talking about the standard. The new version, 802.11ax, is the 6th version of 802.11, so they’re calling it Wi-Fi 6. The previous couple of generations will get the same treatment retroactively, too. For instance, the existing standard I mentioned before, 802.11ac? That’s called Wi-Fi 5 now.

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How fast is Wi-Fi 6?
That’s a topic of some debate, and we won’t have a definitive answer until we’ve had the chance to fully test the hardware out for ourselves, but the overall refrain from industry experts is that Wi-Fi 6 will offer speeds that are roughly 30% faster than Wi-Fi 5, with theoretical maximum transfer speeds up around 10 Gbps. 
That figure held up in our first round of Wi-Fi 6 speed tests, where we clocked Wi-Fi 6 transfer speeds at 1,320 Mbps. That’s about 40% faster than the fastest Wi-Fi 5 speed we’ve ever measured, which is 938 Mbps. And I’d add that our Wi-Fi 6 speed test was about 1,000% faster than the current average download speed in the US, which is 119 Mbps.
The actual number you ultimately experience will really depend on context, though, because it’s a lot more speed than you’re likely to ever need from a single device. In environments with lots and lots of devices that need to connect, Wi-Fi 6 might make a huge difference. In small homes with only a few devices on the network, the difference might be harder to notice.
The other important thing to keep in mind is that the speed from your internet service provider (ISP) is like a speed limit for your local network — a Wi-Fi 6 router won’t magically speed it up. In my home, I’m lucky enough to have a direct fiber connection, and my entry-level plan allows for speeds of up to 300 Mbps, but that’s only 25% of what a Wi-Fi 6 router can offer. If I wanted to take full advantage of a Wi-Fi 6 router’s extra speed, I’d need a faster plan from my ISP to match it. And right now, most plans don’t go nearly that high.
In other words, ISPs still have a lot of work to do with fiber rollouts and such in order to really capitalize on next-gen router technology, and that might take years. But when those faster ISP speeds get here, it appears that the hardware will be ready to go.

When will Wi-Fi 6 get here?
Wi-Fi 6 is already technically a thing — it’s a new, certified standard that newly-made wireless devices can put to use. It’ll be a while before you have a ton of options, but Wi-Fi 6 routers from brands like Cisco, Netgear, Asus and TP-Link are already rolling out, including mesh options for the Netgear Orbi and TP-Link Deco lineups with release dates set for the second half of the year. Meanwhile, the Samsung Galaxy S10 was the first phone to support Wi-Fi 6, and the new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro and Pro Max all support it, too. And now that the Wi-Fi Alliance’s certification program for Wi-Fi 6 devices is officially up and running, it’s a pretty sure bet that the next generation of laptops, streaming devices and Wi-Fi smart home devices will follow suit, too.
New Wi-Fi 6 routers, like the TP-Link Archer AX6000 here, are available for purchase now or will be in the coming months. They won’t come cheap, though.
TP-Link
Read more: When will we start seeing Wi-Fi 6 smart home gadgets?
You’ll need both a Wi-Fi 6 router and Wi-Fi 6 devices like those in order to reap the full benefits of 802.11ax, but if you go ahead and get that fancy new router, your older devices will still work like normal. The rub is that they won’t be much faster, if at all — Wi-Fi 6 supports previous-gen 802.11 devices, but it can’t do much to speed them up. 
Who made Wi-Fi 6?
Wi-Fi 6 was developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the world’s largest association of technical professionals. Along with a lot of other functions (its stated mission is “to advance technology for the benefit of humanity”), the IEEE is basically the keeper of Wi-Fi, with committees responsible for developing it and establishing industry standards.
So how is Wi-Fi 6 better than before?
Analogy time!
Who’s thirsty?
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Imagine a bar with lots of patrons trying to order drinks and just one bartender on duty. He’s good at his job and capable of multitasking to an extent to speed up service, but it’s still a pretty congested scene, and some patrons are going to have to wait.
That bartender is your router, and the patrons are all of the devices in your home that use Wi-Fi to communicate with it — your phone, your laptop, your smart home devices, etc. All of them need the bartender’s attention, but there’s only so much to go around, and he’s only so good at his job.
Replacing your router with a Wi-Fi 6 router is sort of like replacing that bartender with Goro from Mortal Kombat. He’s a large, terrifying Shokan warrior if you aren’t familiar, but the important part as far as this analogy is concerned is that he’s got four arms. 
Suddenly, bartender Goro is serving up drinks to multiple wide-eyed patrons at once. Along with the four arms speeding things up, it turns out he has a knack for the job, too. He’s using each of his humongous hands to drop off multiple drinks in front of multiple customers in a single pass, then grabbing empty glasses on the way back to keep the bar clear. The customers are confused but impressed. Guy’s a pro!
OK… But what does that mean on a technical level?
Fine, analogy over. Wi-Fi 6 is designed to allow network access points like routers to communicate more efficiently with more users and devices at once, and in a way that helps them use less power.
For starters, Wi-Fi 6 routers will be able to pack more information into each signal they send, which means they’ll be able to communicate with devices faster and more efficiently. In addition, Wi-Fi 6 access points will be able to divy up each individual signal between multiple recipient devices, servicing all of them with a single transmission like a delivery truck driver with multiple stops on her route (or, you know, like Goro serving multiple drinks at once with his enormous, three-fingered hands).

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Wi-Fi 6 may be more life-changing than 5G

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QAM FTW
Like I said, Wi-Fi 6 routers will be able to send more information with each signal — bigger pours from Goro as he slings drinks. To understand how, know that Wi-Fi works using radios. Devices that want to send a Wi-Fi transmission modulate the signal of a frequency on a specific radio channel. To the device receiving the transmission, those specific modulations signify specific bits of binary code — the ones and zeroes that make up every piece of digital information you’ve ever consumed.
This approach is called quadrature amplitude modulation, or QAM. The better your router is at QAM, the more binary code it can send with each transmission. For instance, a 2-QAM access point would only be able to modulate the Wi-Fi radio waves in one of two ways, so each transmission could only be a 1 or a 0. A 4-QAM access point could modulate the radio waves in four distinct ways, which would allow it to send either 00, 01, 10, or 11 with each transmission. Two digits at once means more code at once — that’s better! 
These days, current-gen Wi-Fi 5 routers are 256-QAM, which lets them send eight digits of binary at once. That was a big jump from what came before, and it’s a big reason why after 2013 or so, when Wi-Fi 5 started rolling out, people started spending a lot less time waiting for videos to buffer.
Wi-Fi 6 will raise things up to 1024-QAM, which lets devices send ten digits of binary with each transmission. The Wi-Fi Alliance claims that this will equate to speed boosts of up to 30% and increase throughput for “emerging, bandwidth-intensive use cases” — your 4K streams, your augmented reality apps, what have you. And again, our first batch of Wi-Fi 6 speed tests backs that claim up.

OFDMA makes your router a better multi-tasker
Remember Goro’s four arms? Of course you do, it’s his defining characteristic (and I keep bringing it up — sorry not sorry!) Well, for the purpose of my bartending analogy, you can think of those four arms as something called orthagonal frequency division multiple access, or OFDMA. Yes, this will be on the test.
Put simply, OFDMA is a new feature with Wi-Fi 6 that gives your router the ability to serve multiple clients at once within a single channel. Rather than giving your router four arms, what OFDMA does is allow your router to divide whatever channel it’s using to send its signals on the 2.4 or 5GHz frequency band into smaller frequency allocations called resource units, or RUs. Each one of these RUs is sort of like one of Goro’s extra arms — they give your router another avenue with which to dish out information, which in turn, reduces latency.
So, as an example, if you’re sitting in your living room checking Twitter while streaming Game of Thrones, your Wi-Fi 6 router might allocate one RU to your streaming device and another to your phone, or divide the data each device requires between multiple RUs. Either way, they’ll both get service from the router simultaneously. OFDMA is flexible like that (cut to Goro cracking his knuckles).
OFDMA will complement another feature worth mentioning that’s called multi-user, multiple input multiple output, or MU-MIMO for short. Like OFDMA, MU-MIMO lets your router communicate with multiple devices at once, but instead of dividing channels into resource units, MU-MIMO uses spatial differences between devices to divide attention between them.
MU-MIMO was first introduced in 2015 as an upgrade for Wi-Fi 5, but it only worked for outgoing signals from the router. The Wi-Fi 6 version of MU-MIMO will fix that, and let your router handle incoming signals from multiple devices, too.
Target Wake Time 
Wi-Fi 6 access points will also be smarter about scheduling when devices should wake up and request information. This helps those devices avoid interfering with each other, which, in turn, helps them spend more time in their battery-saving sleep modes. That means you might not have to swap out the batteries in things like smart locks and motion sensors quite as often.
This is all thanks to a new feature called Target Wake Time that essentially lets your router act as a traffic cop. When a device like a temperature sensor or a smart lock on your network needs to periodically ping the router to report its status, Wi-Fi 6 will let the router put it on a schedule to keep it from colliding with another incoming signal and creating congestion. 
To bring our bartender Goro back into it, Target Wake Time is a little like giving him the ability to schedule when customers can place orders, which in turn means they’ll have to spend less energy talking over one another to get his attention.
The Samsung Galaxy S10 is the first phone to support Wi-Fi 6, and more are certain to follow suit.
Angela Lang/CNET
When and where will Wi-Fi 6 make a difference for me?
It’s still early for Wi-Fi 6, though the Wi-Fi Alliance recently launched its certification program for devices that use 802.11ax, which is a significant step on the path towards widespread adoption. Flagship smart phones like the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 and the iPhone 11 support Wi-Fi 6, and you’ll find Wi-Fi 6 routers on the shelf at retail outlets like Best Buy, too.
That said, there really isn’t much reason for most folks to rush out and buy one just yet. For starters, most cost hundreds of dollars at this point, so you’ll likely be able to find a better deal if you wait for a sale next year. And even if you buy a Wi-Fi 6 router right now, you won’t really be able to take advantage of it until the majority of the devices in your home support the standard, too. That’s still a long ways off.
And remember, Wi-Fi 6 is an upgrade for routers and Wi-Fi devices, not an upgrade to your Wi-Fi service in general. If you have a slow connection from your service provider to start with, a Wi-Fi 6 router won’t fix that.
Still, along with the earliest of adopters, expect to see businesses begin to buy in on the enterprise level by the end of this year. With improved capabilities for handling lots of devices at once being the key gist of the upgrade, you can expect Wi-Fi 6 to soon start making a noticeable difference in dense, crowded spaces like stadiums and airports, too.
Incoming coverage
We’ll be testing out the first generation of Wi-Fi 6 routers later this year, so stay tuned for a lot more on that front. In the meantime, feel free to click the little envelope icon on my CNET profile page to send your questions my way. All of those submissions go straight to my inbox, and I make an effort to respond to all of them (just, you know, be at least somewhat nice).
Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have the weirdest hankering to go and play Mortal Kombat at a dive bar. BRB.
Originally published May 11.Update, September 17: Adds mention of the Wi-Fi Alliance’s recent launch of official Wi-Fi 6 device certification.  

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Google Home: Two settings to achieve max smart home privacy – CNET

Keep your personal information private by setting up Voice Match on Google Home. Josh Miller/CNET Some things Google Home knows about you are obvious — what music you like, how bad you are at math — because those are the things you rely on it for the most. But Google Home ($130 at QVC) knows a…

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Google Home: Two settings to achieve max smart home privacy     – CNET

Keep your personal information private by setting up Voice Match on Google Home.
Josh Miller/CNET
Some things Google Home knows about you are obvious — what music you like, how bad you are at math — because those are the things you rely on it for the most. But Google Home ($130 at QVC) knows a lot more about you than you might realize. That’s because your smart home speaker is tied to your Google account, so it’s also connected to a deep well of personal information, like your email address and debit or credit card number. That means privacy and security settings are just as important with Google Home as with your Gmail account.A lot of the same steps you should take to protect your Gmail account, like using a strong password and checking your recovery contact information, will help secure Google Home as well. But you may not know how to get to those settings using the Google Home app, which may be the only Google app you have on your phone or tablet.

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Here’s how to find and set the two most important privacy and security settings using the Google Home app.Facial recognition technology has come under fire from privacy advocates, but it can also be used to help secure your data.
James Martin/CNET
Secure your privacy with voice or face recognitionWhen you set up a Voice Match profile on Google Home, your smart speakers will listen for your voice and use it like a fingerprint to identify you. That way, only you can check your calendar, add to your shopping list or watch your YouTube playlist on Nest Hub smart displays. Other people can still use Google Home and can even set up voice profiles with their own Google accounts, but only you will have access to your information.That said, turning on Voice Match means possibly giving Google data about what you sound like. Google says that information is stored on your devices themselves and not in the cloud, although it may be “temporarily sent to Google to better identify” you. If you’re not OK with that, this feature is not for you.Here’s how to set up Voice Match with Google Home (the process is the same for Face Match, only it uses your device’s camera and your face rather than its microphone and your voice):1. Open the Google Home app, then tap your personal icon in the upper-right corner, then tap Assistant settings.2. On the horizontal menu bar, tap Assistant and then scroll down and tap Voice Match.3. Tap Add a device. The Google Home app will scan your current Wi-Fi network for compatible devices. Once it does, tap Continue. 4. Under Activate Voice Match on this device tap the box labeled I agree, then scroll to the bottom of the next screen and tap the next box with I agree.5. Follow prompts to teach Google to recognize your voice.Two-factor authentication isn’t foolproof, but it does add a layer of security that makes breaking into your online accounts more difficult.
James Martin/CNET
How to set up two-factor authentication on Google HomeTwo-factor authentication, aka two-step verification, isn’t a completely foolproof means of securing an online account, but it’s miles better than nothing at all. Having two-factor set up on Google Home means if anyone were to try to, say, set up a Google Home smart speaker using your stolen login info, they’d likely be thwarted unless they had also lifted your smartphone. The point is that it won’t hinder nor degrade your experience using Google Home, so there’s really no reason not to set it up.The first thing you need to do is different depending on your phone:Android: make sure you’re signed into the account you use for Google Home by opening Settings, then tap Accounts and then Add Account. Choose Google and sign into your account.iPhone: Download the Gmail app from the App Store, if you don’t already have it, and sign in with the account you use for Google Home, then Allow notifications when promptedTwo-factor authentication won’t impact how you use your Google Home smart speaker once you’ve set it up.
Chris Monroe/CNET
The rest is the same for every phone:1. Open the Google Home app, then tap your personal icon in the upper-right corner, then tap Assistant settings.2. Beneath the You menu, tap Your data in the Assistant then scroll to the very bottom.3. Under More option to manage your privacy, tap the box labeled Google Account.4. Scroll the horizontal menu bar at the top (the one that has Home, Personal info, Data & personalization) over and tap Security.5. Under Signing in to Google, tap Use your phone to sign in. On the next screen tap Set It Up then enter your password and tap Sign in.6. The screen should now say What you need with Your phone (with your phone listed) and Touch ID checked. Tap Next.7. Beneath Try it you should see the email address for your Google Account. Tap the button labeled Next beneath it.8. You should immediately get a notification on your phone asking Trying to sign in? (if you’re on an iPhone this notification will come from the Gmail app). Tap the notification and select Yes.9. If your phone asks if you want to use either facial recognition or fingerprint identification (whichever your phone has) select Yes.10. Go back to the Google Home app, which should now say It worked! Turn it on? and tap the box that says Turn On.Check out our full guide to shoring up your Google Home privacy and security settings here, or our even broader guide to securing your overall Google account here. For email-specific privacy settings, here are four Gmail settings to change right away.

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Samsung Brings Its Flagship Camera Innovation to Galaxy A Series – GalaxyA71 & A51, to Make Your Social Profile Awesome

Our social media profiles are reflection of our true personalities. Needless to say, we make that extra effort to make them look and feel special. What helps us in the process is a powerful smartphone that can not only capture stunning photos and videos, but also help us quickly process and share them across to…

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Samsung Brings Its Flagship Camera Innovation to Galaxy A Series – GalaxyA71 & A51, to Make Your Social Profile Awesome

Our social media profiles are reflection of our true personalities. Needless to say, we make that extra effort to make them look and feel special. What helps us in the process is a powerful smartphone that can not only capture stunning photos and videos, but also help us quickly process and share them across to our friends and family members.Samsung’s phones are known for their excellent smartphone cameras. Over the years, the company has been shipping highly innovative and impressive cameras on its flagship smartphones. Samsung is now bringing its innovative flagship camera experiences to its Galaxy A series phones, the Samsung Galaxy A51 and Galaxy A71. These new flagship-level camera features can help you spice up your social media profiles by capturing and sharing stunning photographs and videos.Let’s take a look at some of the most impressive new camera features in Samsung’s Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51 smartphones at can help you take your social media posts to the next level:Single Take Makes Your Special Moments Extra OrdinaryEverything you do is worth sharing on your social media profiles and messaging platforms. Your social profiles help you stay connected to your loved ones by helping you share your most memorable moments. Single Take is a new feature on Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51 smartphones, which was earlier available only on Samsung’s flagship Galaxy S20 series.Single Take lets you indulge in your special moments, while still capturing the best parts of it. Imagine being at a birthday celebration of a loved one, and wondering about which camera mode to select. Single Take can help you enjoy the moment while still being able to capture all the important details in a maximum of 7 photos & 3 videos based on the moment and lighting condition.All you have to do is pick Single Take mode, and capture a moment for a few seconds. Your Galaxy A71 or Galaxy A51 phone will be able to deliver stunning photos and videos that ensure you don’t miss out on anything important, and still end up with a bunch of great photos and videos to share on your social media profile.Night Hyper lapse to Impress Everyone on Your FeedOut at a party? The new Night Hyperlapse mode can help you capture stunning night-time videos to impress your social media friends and family. The mode helps you capture long-exposure style videos and light trails that are nothing but pieces of pure bliss when you share them on your social media profiles. Your friends and family will nudge you, asking you how you captured these. Night Hyperlapse mode is now available on Samsung Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51 phones.Custom Filters to Add that Special Touch to Your PhotosWhile social media is fun, it’s also filled with a lot of noise. You’re not going to make it if you don’t look different and extra special. Well, Samsung has you covered here as well. The new Custom Filters feature in the Samsung Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51 can help you create stunning and highly personalized photos using custom-set filters.All you have to do is create a custom filter using any of your existing photos. Custom Filters uses on-device AI to capture the rich colours and vibes of your existing photos. You can then use these filters and apply them on new photos you capture on the Galaxy A71 or Galaxy A51 to create personalized photos. Once you share these on your social media profiles, they’ll look stunning and extraordinary, unlike anyone else’s photos.Smart Selfie Angle to Make You and Your Friends Looks GreatSelfies are quite an essential part of social media. While everyone is shooting and sharing selfies, not all of them are going to look as good as yours, thanks to this highly innovative camera feature on the Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51.The new Smart Selfie Angle mode on the Samsung Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51 help you capture great selfies with your friends. Every time you use the front camera to capture a selfie with your friends, the camera can automatically switch to a wide-angle mode. The mode is built to capture great details when more than one person is involved in a selfie. This means your selfies with your friends are going to look fabulous when you share them on your social media profiles.Quick Video to capture videos easily when you are in the moveNever miss an important moment in your life by fiddling with smartphone camera modes. The new Quick Video mode in the Samsung Galaxy A51, Galaxy A71 lets you capture a video by long-pressing the camera button to kick off the recording. You won’t have to manually switch to the video recording mode in the camera while you shooting for your social media profiles.It makes capturing videos for your social media post simpler and easier, especially while you’re on the move. Quick Video is essential to capture those precious few seconds of moments which you’ll cherish for a long time in the future.Switch Camera While Recording that can help you save a lot of timeYou can now seamlessly switch between front and rear cameras while recording a video on your Samsung Galaxy A51. The feature is great for social media influencers and other users who want to create pro-level videos using both front and rear camera. You don’t have to stop recording to switch cameras anymore, making it more convenient and efficient to capture great videos.AI Gallery Zoom Adds That Magical Touch to Existing PhotosAI Gallery Zoom is a great feature that make the images look sharper & clearer. For example, if you get one of your photos from a friend, on a messaging platform, it could turn out to be slightly blurred due to compression systems.This feature ensures those unclear photos look more clear in your Gallery. It can make images look sharper and visually appealing, so you can easily share them on your social media profiles. The feature uses an on-device AI-powered mechanism so your personal data doesn’t leave your phone ever. The feature is also useful if you’re migrating from an older, less powerful smartphone, and are importing photos from it.Samsung Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51 Are Perfect for Social InfluencersYou can capture a wider world with the Ultra Wide Night Mode camera’s wider field of vision. The Quad Cam’s built-in 5MP Macro Cam shoots with clarity and quality helping you bring out the ultra-fine details of your close-up shots. The Slow- mo Selfie feature on the Galaxy A71 lets you capture all kinds of stunning slow motion selfies with its 32MP front camera. So, what’s stopping you from becoming the next big thing on social media? It could be your existing smartphone. Switch to the new and powerful Samsung Galaxy A71 or Galaxy A51 and feel the difference today. The smartphones now come with Samsung’s highly innovative and powerful flagship-grade camera features that can make your social media posts pop, turning you into a celebrity amongst your fans and followers.Buy the Galaxy A51 and Galaxy A71 today! Affiliate links may be automatically generated – see our ethics statement for details.

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Realme Narzo 20 Pro, Narzo 20A, Narzo 20 Launching on September 21: What Do We Know So Far

Realme Narzo 20 Pro, Realme Narzo 20A, and the Realme Narzo 20 will be launching in India on September 21 and are expected to carry Android 11-based Realme UI 2.0. That’s pretty all that has been officially revealed about the series by the company; however, there have been several leaks and rumours surrounding the phones.…

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Realme Narzo 20 Pro, Narzo 20A, Narzo 20 Launching on September 21: What Do We Know So Far

Realme Narzo 20 Pro, Realme Narzo 20A, and the Realme Narzo 20 will be launching in India on September 21 and are expected to carry Android 11-based Realme UI 2.0. That’s pretty all that has been officially revealed about the series by the company; however, there have been several leaks and rumours surrounding the phones. The Realme Narzo 20 series was initially teased by the company at the start of September and then once again at IFA Berlin 2020. Now, as we move closer to the official unveiling, let’s take a look at what we know so far.Realme Narzo 20 series India launch event, expected pricingThe Realme Narzo 20 series is set to launch in India on September 21 through a virtual event and the company has already sent out invites for the same. The event will start at 12.30pm and will be streamed on Realme’s social media platforms including Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.The Narzo 20 series is a follow up to the Realme Narzo 10 series that was launched in India back in May, offering impressive specifications for an entry level price point. The Realme Narzo 10 launched at Rs. 11,999 for the sole, 4GB + 128GB storage model and the even cheaper Realme Narzo 10A came with a price tag of Rs. 8,499 for the single 3GB + 32GB storage option. The Realme Narzo 20 series can be expected to be priced around the same, at least for the non-Pro variants.Realme Narzo 20 series colour variants, configurationsA known tipster claimed earlier this month that the Realme Narzo 20 will come in 4GB + 64GB and 4GB + 128GB storage variants. It was also said to have two colour options, namely Glory Silver and Victory Blue. The Realme Narzo 20A that is likely to be the cheapest of the three models, is said to come in 3GB + 32GB and 4GB + 64GB storage variants. Further, it could come in the same Glory Silver and Victory Blue colour variants.On the other hand, the Realme Narzo 20 Pro is said to come in 6GB + 64GB and 8GB + 128GB storage options. The phone is rumoured to be offered in Black Ninja and White Knight shades.Realme Narzo 20 Pro specifications (expected)Tipster Mukul Sharma recently tweeted the alleged specifications for the all three phone models. The Realme Narzo 20 Pro may feature a 6.5-inch full-HD+ (1,080×2,400 pixels) display with a 90Hz refresh rate and 90.5 percent screen-to-body ratio. The phone is expected to be powered by the MediaTek Helio G95 SoC.In terms of cameras, the Realme Narzo 20 Pro is expected to feature a quad rear camera setup that will include a 48-megapixel sensor with an f/1.8 lens, an 8-megapixel sensor with an ultra-wide f/2.3 lens, a 2-megapixel macro shooter with f/2.4 aperture, and a 2-megapixel sensor with an f/2.4 black and white portrait lens. For selfies and video calling, the phone may sport a 16-megapixel shooter with f/2.1 aperture.It is said to come with 4,500mAh battery with support for 65W fast charging. The smartphone may feature a side-facing fingerprint scanner. The Realme Narzo 20 Pro may measure 162.3×75.4×9.4mm and weigh 191 grams.Realme Narzo 20 specifications (expected)The Realme Narzo 20 is said to feature a 6.5-inch HD+ (720×1,600 pixels) display with 88.7 percent screen-to-body ratio. It may be powered by the MediaTek Helio G85. It may feature a triple rear camera setup that includes a 48-megapixel primary image sensor with a 6P lens and f/1.8 aperture, an 8-megapixel ultrawide lens with a field of view of 119 degrees, and a 2-megapixel macro lens. A massive 6,000mAh battery with support for 18W fast charging is expected as well.Realme Narzo 20A specifications (expected)The same tipster also shared specifications for the Realme Narzo 20A. The dual-SIM Narzo 20A is expected to feature a 6.5-inch HD+ (720×1,600 pixels) display with Gorilla Glass protection and a screen-to-body ratio of 89.8 percent. It may be powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 665 SoC.In terms of optics, the Realme Narzo 20A is expected to feature a triple rear camera setup that includes a 12-megapixel primary sensor with an f/1.8 lens, a 2-megapixel black and white sensor with an f/2.4 lens, and a 2-megapixel retro sensor with f/2.4 lens. For selfies, the phone is expected to feature an 8-megapixel shooter at the front.The Realme Narzo 20A may pack a 5,000mAh battery with support for 10W charging. In terms of connectivity, the phone is said to support Bluetooth 5.0 and 2.4GHz Wi-Fi.Should the government explain why Chinese apps were banned? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. 

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