See Blink-182, Dashboard Confessional, and more from this year's Riot Fest - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
Connect with us
[adrotate group="1"]

Celebrity News

See Blink-182, Dashboard Confessional, and more from this year’s Riot Fest

Advertisement Advertisement Wu Tang Clan RZA and crew played Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) cover-to-cover during their set 2 of 18 Against Me! From the band’s after-party performance at the Metro, where they played “As The Eternal Cowboy” and “New Wave” 3 of 18 Advertisement Violent Femmes One thing in your tour bag:  Brian – “Well,…

Published

on

See Blink-182, Dashboard Confessional, and more from this year’s Riot Fest

Advertisement

Advertisement

Wu Tang Clan

RZA and crew played Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) cover-to-cover during their set

2
of
18

Against Me!

From the band’s after-party performance at the Metro, where they played “As The Eternal Cowboy” and “New Wave”

3
of
18

Advertisement

Violent Femmes

One thing in your tour bag: 
Brian – “Well, one thing we don’t bring is the set list, and that’s what makes us special… you’ve got to gauge the vibe, get on stage, see the audience and know what they’re ready for, not ready for, what’s gonna work and what’s not gonna work. And that’s the reason why, instead of what we bring, what we don’t bring is a very crucial part of our show”

4
of
18

Chris Carrabba of Dashboard Confessional

What is next for Dashboard?
“I don’t make my music by design, it just starts to come out, it’s starting to happen now. So I would say that’s on the horizon. I don’t know when, I don’t know how far out on the horizon, but songs are starting to come. I long ago stopped trying to push the songs… I’ve learned you can’t rush a record so you can go back on tour. The songs won’t be as good, and even if they are, you, I, won’t care about them as much.”

5
of
18

Taking Back Sunday

On performing two full albums at the fest:
Adam: “Well for us, 2019 marks 20 full years since we’ve been a band and so we wanted to celebrate that. I guess this is the only thing I’ve done consistently for 20 years in my life and to hit that milestone and be fortunate enough as we are to do that, it should be celebrated and we want to go celebrate with the people that made [it] possible.”

6
of
18

Advertisement

Advertisement

The Hu

Who are you guys excited to see at Riot Fest:
“SLAYER!!!!” 
One thing always in your tour bag:
“Everywhere we go, we bring Mongolia energy, love, support, and our message: ‘Be united, be strong, and do something good for the world.’”

7
of
18

Sincere Engineer

On being a Chicago local playing Riot Fest:
“We have a lot of friends here so it’s going to be pretty cool but I’m definitely super nervous. I’ve come to this thing since it’s started — since I was 13 or something, before it was even a festival, when it was at the Congress theater — so it’s weird to be on this side of it now.”

8
of
18

Dave Hause and the Mermaid

Advice for festival goers:
Dave – “Hydrate and wear sunscreen… also the ticket is, don’t wait in any line. If anything is a headache, there is some other thing you can do that you’re gonna have more fun at.”

9
of
18

Advertisement

Drakulas

On doing interviews out of character:
Zach — “We definitely have a character thing happening so when we’re doing interviews it’s ‘should we be doing this in character?’”
Mike — “I prefer talking about it like a film or something and you know, we wrote this film and these are the characters in the film and the characters do this and that but I don’t have to BE in character to talk about or stay in character the whole time — which would be bad anyways.”

10
of
18

Advertisement

The Descendents

How do you prep for such a high-energy performance?
“Coffee. Seriously, our drummer says if he didn’t drink 12 espressos he wouldn’t be able to play. It’s the vagueries of age: as you get older it takes more and more caffeine to get up there. These are beats that we wrote when we were 17 years old and they still have to go the same speed. So we have to make use of our favorite drug.”

11
of
18

Advertisement

Hot Water Music

Advice for veteran artists: 
Chuck — “Pace yourself, you’re only gonna get slower, it’s only going to hurt more, it takes longer to heal, and it definitely takes longer for weight to fall off. You can’t just eat and drink anything you want anymore.”
Chris — “When I was coming up I was always getting to meet a lot of the vets. I’d say, ‘just keep being cool to younger bands.’ I’ve had this a lot where we got to meet bands that we always looked up to and they’ve been great, supportive, and always looked out for you.”

12
of
18

Advertisement

This Wild Life

Who were you excited to see at Riot Fest this year:
Kevin — “We played at the same time as the Village People so I was pretty bummed about that. My joke when we first saw the lineup was that we’re going to play “YMCA” first and steal their thunder.”

13
of
18

Advertisement

Teenage Bottlerocket

Advice for new performers:
Miguel — “Try not to get run over by a fork lift”

14
of
18

Advertisement

The Beaches

On snacking:
Jordan — “Honestly, I’m more so taking the snacks that the festival provides. We got some really good, healthyish snacks that are those popcorn chips, pop corners I think? I have those in my bag ready for the ride back.”

15
of
18

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Read More

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code

Music News

Country Outlaw Songwriter Billy Joe Shaver Dies at 81

He became a reliable storyteller, logging songs with Kris Kristofferson (“Good Christian Soldier”), Tom T. Hall (“Willie the Wandering Gypsy and Me”), the Allman Brothers (“Sweet Mama”) and Elvis (“You Asked Me To”). When Jennings invited Shaver to Nashville to work on what became his 1973 outlaw country landmark album Honky Tonk Heroes, Shaver burst into national…

Published

on

By

Country Outlaw Songwriter Billy Joe Shaver Dies at 81

He became a reliable storyteller, logging songs with Kris Kristofferson (“Good Christian Soldier”), Tom T. Hall (“Willie the Wandering Gypsy and Me”), the Allman Brothers (“Sweet Mama”) and Elvis (“You Asked Me To”). When Jennings invited Shaver to Nashville to work on what became his 1973 outlaw country landmark album Honky Tonk Heroes, Shaver burst into national prominence. He landed credits on 10 out of 11 tracks on the album that is often tagged as the first, and some say best, “outlaw” LP from a back-to-basics 1970s movement that included Willie Nelson, Kristofferson, Merle Haggard, Johnny Cash and a number of others.In 1973, he also released his Kristofferson-produced solo debut, Old Five and Dimers Like Me, which included his beloved songs “Willie the Wandering Gypsy and Me” and “Georgia on a Fast Train.” Cash covered his song “I’m Just an Old Chunk of Coal (But I’m Gonna Be a Diamond Some Day),” which he wrote after giving up drugs and alcohol. In all, Shaver released nearly 2 dozen albums on a variety of labels (MGM, Capricorn, Columbia, new West, Sugar Hill), earning a Grammy nomination for Best Southern/Country/Bluegrass Album for his 2007 effort Everybody’s Brother. His most recent release, 2014’s Long in the Tooth, was his first to chart on Billboard’s Top Country Albums tally and it featured a duet with Nelson on “Hard to Be an Outlaw.”Shaver received the first-ever Lifetime Achievement Award in Songwriting from the Americana Music Association in 2002 and was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2004 and the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame in 2006. His highest praise, however, came from the men who towered in the genre and whom he called friends. Cash once referred to Shaver as “my favorite songwriter,” and good pal Nelson said he was “definitely the best writer in Texas… Everything he writes is just poetry.”His rough-and-tumble songs often emerged from a life that had its share of tragedies and heartache, from his son Eddy’s 2000 death from a heroin overdose to the nearly fatal heart attack he suffered onstage in 2001 and a notorious incident in 2007 when a bar fight ended with Shaver shooting another man in the face; he was acquitted of the charges and turned the scuffle into the song “Wacko From Waco.”Shaver also acted in a number of films, including Secondhand Lions, The Wendell Baker Story and Bait Shop, and his song “Live Forever” was performed by his friend Robert Duvall in the Oscar-winning film Crazy Heart; Duvall cast Shaver in his 1996 movie The Apostle and produced the 2004 documentary A Portrait of Billy Joe.Check out some of Shaver’s songs below.

Continue Reading

Celebrity News

Broadway comes to TV with ‘American Utopia’ and ‘What the Constitution Means to Me’

Both shows are worth the time, although seeing them at home, frankly, reinforces what’s lost in translation given the tingle that live theater, at its best, can send up your spine — a sensation that doesn’t quite emerge on either front. Together, they underscore what “Hamilton” so impressively accomplished by conjuring that elusive magic. Notably,…

Published

on

By

Broadway comes to TV with ‘American Utopia’ and ‘What the Constitution Means to Me’

Both shows are worth the time, although seeing them at home, frankly, reinforces what’s lost in translation given the tingle that live theater, at its best, can send up your spine — a sensation that doesn’t quite emerge on either front. Together, they underscore what “Hamilton” so impressively accomplished by conjuring that elusive magic. Notably, HBO Max’s “The West Wing” special also captures some of that by bringing a TV show to the stage for the purposes of watching at home. (Like CNN, HBO is a unit of WarnerMedia.)Byrne, the Talking Heads front man, has always possessed a theatrical and cinematic flair, including his 1986 directorial effort “True Stories.” Those qualities inform “American Utopia,” a collection of songs — imaginatively choreographed and lit — that conveys the joyous and playful aspects of his music.On the plus side, that sense of fun is entertaining enough. The main drawback is that while Byrne addresses pressing issues during his chatting with the audience — including the importance of voting, and introducing his performance of Janelle Monae’s “Hell You Talmbout,” name-checking Black people killed by police — there’s scant thematic adhesive to the presentation, unlike some other productions wedding rock to Broadway (Bruce Springsteen’s “Springsteen on Broadway,” filmed for Netflix, comes to mind).Lee does an admirable job of shooting the performance from every conceivable angle, although while the overhead shots are quite cool, one could probably do without closeups on Byrne’s feet, which along with the rest of the performers, are bare.Byrne’s playlist includes the hit “Burning Down the House,” and a boisterous rendition of “Road to Nowhere,” which includes a march through the appreciative audience.”American Utopia” doesn’t set the screen ablaze, but Byrne and his collaborators certainly know how to put on a show, even when it feels like they’re going nowhere.”What the Constitution Means to Me,” by contrast, is an audacious idea, one that starts slowly — at least in this format — before sinking in its hooks about halfway through.Playwright-star Schreck (a Tony nominee on both scores) earned college tuition money by competing in Constitutional debates, and revives her 15-year-old self to explore — humorously at first, pointedly later — its troubling and inequitable aspects, including mistreatment of women.Schreck’s reminiscing about “Dirty Dancing” and visiting legion halls to wax eloquently about the Constitution to mostly older men come into sharper focus when she exits the time capsule, and pivots to speaking in her 40-something voice.At that moment her memories and observations become sharper, from the patriarchal values of the court to violence against women to her own experience with abortion.”When abortion became illegal, it didn’t become rare,” she says, referencing the days before Roe v. Wade. “It only became deadly.”Schreck closes by engaging in a debate with a teen orator, Rosdely Ciprian, about whether the Constitution is indeed the living, breathing document that we’ve been taught to admire in school — adaptable to the modern age — or a hopelessly dated construct that needs to be discarded, starting over from scratch. It’s an interesting device, while lacking the impact of the material that precedes it.Directed by Marielle Heller (“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”), “What the Constitution Means to Me” serves as a reminder that those pining for the past tend to ignore historic inequalities. There’s even quotation from the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — who caused a stir when she saw the show last year — which makes the special feel extra timely and poignant.Minor drawbacks aside, both shows have plenty to recommend them. And if live theater means anything to you, they provide at least a taste of what you’re missing.”What the Constitution Means to Me” premieres Oct. 16 on Amazon.”American Utopia” premieres Oct. 17 at 8 p.m. ET on HBO, which like CNN, is a unit of WarnerMedia.

Continue Reading

Celebrity News

Taraji P. Henson confirms split from fiancé Kelvin Hayden

The “What Men Want” actress confirmed during an appearance Monday on “The Breakfast Club” that she and the former NFL player have ended their engagement.”I just turned 50 and I mean, I hadn’t said it yet, but it didn’t work out,” she told the hosts of the popular New York City radio show. “I tried.…

Published

on

By

Taraji P. Henson confirms split from fiancé Kelvin Hayden

The “What Men Want” actress confirmed during an appearance Monday on “The Breakfast Club” that she and the former NFL player have ended their engagement.”I just turned 50 and I mean, I hadn’t said it yet, but it didn’t work out,” she told the hosts of the popular New York City radio show. “I tried. I was, like ‘Therapy, let’s do the therapy thing,’ but if you’re both not on the same page with that then you feel like, you’re taking it on yourself. And that’s not a fair position for anybody to play in a relationship.”The couple got engaged in 2018 and were scheduled to be married in June this year.In March Henson told “Extra” they were postponing the wedding due to the coronavirus pandemic.”It’s probably going to be more like July,” she said at the time. “We have to see what this will be like at the other end.”The “Empire” star was part of a panel discussion on “The Breakfast Club” about trauma and relationships.She said she loves Black men and Black love and is a fan of mental health support for her community. “It hurts when relationships don’t last,” she said. “I love to see Black love and I want to see more of it. I want to see our relationships last and make it.”

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!