TD customers question how Visa Debit chequing accounts were compromised | CBC News - Lebanon news - أخبار لبنان
Connect with us
[adrotate group="1"]

World News

TD customers question how Visa Debit chequing accounts were compromised | CBC News

When Jenn Kivimaki noticed an unexpected charge of $119.88 from Spotify in her TD chequing account last week, it was alarmingly familiar. In 2015, she was shocked to find her TD bank account about $20,000 in overdraft while she was attending a friend’s funeral. Someone had been using her debit number at U.S. supermarkets from New Jersey to California. Her…

Published

on

TD customers question how Visa Debit chequing accounts were compromised | CBC News

When Jenn Kivimaki noticed an unexpected charge of $119.88 from Spotify in her TD chequing account last week, it was alarmingly familiar. In 2015, she was shocked to find her TD bank account about $20,000 in overdraft while she was attending a friend’s funeral. Someone had been using her debit number at U.S. supermarkets from New Jersey to California. Her bank froze her account and she had to borrow money to get home from Thunder Bay, Ont., to Fort Frances, Ont., about a four-hour drive. “I want to know how things keep happening, especially when they say there’s a fraud alert on my account … it’s kind of a mystery,” she said. TD Canada Trust said its investigation into recent Spotify charges found there was no data breach and that “a very limited” number of cardholders “experienced fraudulent activity incurring unauthorized charges from a single merchant.”   Why some TD customers are being charged for annual Spotify memberships without ever signing up for the music streaming service has left people across Canada worried their bank accounts aren’t secure. The bank has not said how many customers were affected, but dozens of people reported receiving reimbursements last week after a CBC News story about people discovering multiple unauthorized $119.88 Spotify charges in early July. A TD Canada Trust branch is shown in this file photo. The bank says, ‘There is no data breach. TD has in place security measures to protect customer information.’ (The Canadian Press) TD acknowledges some client’s accounts were refunded without their knowledge after the bank started looking into the suspicious transactions. For its part, Spotify attributed the problem to an attack targeting the Canadian debit system. Erin Styles, speaking for Spotify, sent CBC News an email that said, “We do not have anything additional to share beyond the statement I shared with you last week.” Mandi Grayston of Brandon, Man., calls those explanations “absolutely horrifying.” She discovered five credits totalling $599.40 to her account on July 8 after equivalent withdrawals on July 5. Mandi Grayston of Brandon, Man., didn’t know Spotify had removed money from her chequing account until after the company credited it back to her. (Submitted by Mandi Grayston) “Any time you take my money and I didn’t consent to it, no matter if you put it back on my account two days later, you still took my money initially and I did not consent to that. That is theft. Bottom line,” she said.  “No matter what the problem was, Spotify does not have my bank account information.” No ‘satisfactory answers’ Grayston went to a branch to get a new debit card and called TD to find out why she was never notified about the charges.  “I didn’t really get any satisfactory answers from them,” she said. “How did they get my information and how am I protected from this happening again? Do I just become like my grandma and I put my money in a sock under the bed?” Garry Clement, a former RCMP superintendent and current CEO of the Clement Advisory Group, says there’s so much fraud that small unauthorized transactions may not be investigated by law enforcement, but he said it’s important to report situations to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre. (CBC) No one from TD was made available for an interview, but it said in an emailed statement there are security measures in place to protect customers. The bank’s assurances also don’t go far enough for Kivimaki, who said the bank wasn’t able to explain how someone was able to go on a spending spree with her chequing account. Like others affected by the Spotify charges, she had a Visa Debit card, which can be used for online purchases much like a credit card, in addition to operating as an Interac card for in-store purchases or at bank machines. The feature isn’t exclusive to TD. Among others, RBC has a virtual Visa Debit and BMO has a debit MasterCard. Spotify says it has nothing further to add since a July 11 statement that attributed the unauthorized charges to an attack targeting the Canadian debit system. (Reuters) “It’s supposed to function like a Visa. You’re supposed to enter the cardholder’s security code on the back, so I wouldn’t assume you’d be able to do that without that information,” Kivimaki said. “It’s unnerving when it happens more than once when you think your money is safe.” CBC News has reached out to the bank to find out more information about Kivimaki’s 2015 charges.  Visa declined comment to CBC News and said to instead contact TD. Brendan Schiewe of Edmonton asked TD to turn off the Visa Debit feature on his accounts after reading the CBC News story and realizing Spotify had charged his account. Zero-liability policy “We’re fairly cautious about where our online banking information goes … in general, the only kind of payments that come out of our chequing account are related to, kind of those brick-and-mortar-type services, that are pretty day-to-day like utilities or daycare costs,” he said. Visa — like MasterCard, American Express and Interac — offers a zero-liability policy, meaning customers pay nothing if it’s determined someone fraudulently used their account. The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada said those policies are not legally binding, but it does monitor them to ensure the public commitments are adhered to. The agency doesn’t have any recommendations specific to preventing accounts from being hacked, but it suggests people check their statements frequently and review credit reports to keep an eye out for unusual activity. Jenn Kivimaki says she was shocked to discover thousands of dollars worth of fraudulent charges to her TD chequing account in 2015. At the time, she thought her overdraft capped at $300. (Jenn Kivimaki) Garry Clement, a former RCMP superintendent and financial crime expert based in Colborne, Ont., said cybercrime and fraudulent activity involving bank accounts happen more often than many people realize. He expects cybercrime will continue to “rise exponentially,” especially as organized crime gets more involved. Clement said it will continue to be challenging and costly to determine who exactly is responsible. He said banks have tried to build safeguards, but “the big institutions don’t like to publicly broadcast what their levels of fraud is or what’s occurring in their accounts.” ‘The cost of doing business’ “The reality of it is they’re giant institutions handling billions of dollars and billions of transactions in a day. For the most part, I hate to say it, but some of these losses they look at as the cost of doing business and don’t put a lot of weight on doing investigations,” he said. The Spotify charges affecting TD customers are unusual, though, he said. “We know we’ve had massive amounts of leaks at various large corporations over the last few years, but that definitely is indicative of a massive data breach somewhere,” Clement said. Brendan Schiewe says he’s debating reporting an unauthorized charge of $119.88 to the Edmonton Police Service. He has already filed a report with the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre. (Submitted by Brendan Schiewe) Schiewe is one of four Canadians who filed a complaint with the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre after the Spotify charges appeared in the joint chequing account he shares with his wife. He said despite the size of the amount removed, he is considering reporting the incident to the Edmonton Police Service. Clement said reporting cases to the anti-fraud centre can ensure information is gathered for statistical purposes, which he said can help organizations realize the extent of the problem. He advises people not to take the security of their accounts for granted, suggesting strong passwords and monitoring accounts so problems can be reported to institutions quickly. Brendan Schiewe says his wife never authorized a charge to Walgreens and only saw the relatively small amount after checking her TD chequing account balance. He wonders how frequently this happens. (Submitted by Brendan Schiewe ) Last month, Schiewe’s wife also noticed a fraudulent charge of $18.05 to Walgreens on her TD account. It was also reversed without her knowledge. “It does raise my hackles because there’s been no proactive information or disclosure from TD,” he said. “Is it possible that we’re simply really unlucky and both managed to have our information compromised and used within a two- or three-week window and have charges reversed without anyone telling us, or is that just the tip of the iceberg and are there a whole lot of other people who have had the same kind of issues?” Mandi Grayston first noticed she’d been credited almost $600 by Spotify before realizing she’d been charged for five annual memberships to the music streaming service a few days previously. TD didn’t notify her about the problem. (Submitted by Mandi Grayston) Grayston said amid threats of identity theft and online hacking, it’s hard to have confidence that people’s money is safe.  She worries the Spotify charges were a test to see if charging people’s accounts was possible. “How could you not feel horribly vulnerable?” she said. “You need to be going into your bank account at least every couple of days and make sure everything is legitimate.” MORE TOP STORIES
Read More

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code

World News

Hong Kong’s new rules have created confusion in the classroom. Some parents are pulling their children out

“I want him to grow up in an environment with enough freedom to do what he wants to do and not be restricted by some invisible threat,” said Sarah, who requested CNN use a pseudonym for fear of being targeted by authorities.In June, Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong that bans secession,…

Published

on

By

Hong Kong’s new rules have created confusion in the classroom. Some parents are pulling their children out

“I want him to grow up in an environment with enough freedom to do what he wants to do and not be restricted by some invisible threat,” said Sarah, who requested CNN use a pseudonym for fear of being targeted by authorities.In June, Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong that bans secession, subversion, terrorist activities and collusion with foreign powers. The law was passed to quell the pro-democracy movement that destabilized the financial hub last year, but its reach went far beyond policing protests to criminalizing certain conversations, political positions, publications and even social media posts.In Hong Kong’s classrooms, it is now unclear what can legally be taught or discussed.The Education Bureau has ordered schools to remove books and teaching materials that could violate the law. Administrators can call the police if someone insults the Chinese anthem, which must be played in schools on certain holidays. In September, a student who displayed a photo with the slogan “Free Hong Kong, Revolution Now” during class was suspended for a week. Sarah’s move isn’t just for her son: she is a teacher in Hong Kong. The English Schools Foundation, an international education organization, released new guidelines in September for teachers, seen by CNN, which concluded that the classroom “is not a safe space” for discussion or debate. It advised teachers to “always be aware of how what you are teaching could be interpreted/misinterpreted by others.” The former Chief Executive of Hong Kong has even posted on his Facebook page personal details of teachers charged over professional misconduct during the protest last year. In Hong Kong, Sarah owns an apartment and a car — both rare privileges in a city where buying a home is expensive and taking public transport is the norm. But she’s prepared to give it all up for an uncertain life away from family and friends. “We will do any kind of job. Be a cleaner, do the dishes, be a cashier,” she said. “Because it’s the value we place on the freedom that’s more important than the materialistic life we have.”CNN spoke to several parents who said they were also preparing to move abroad for their children’s education, and teachers at some schools have reported a higher than normal drop-out rate this year. One mother, who has two children in local primary schools, said her family will move to the UK before the end of the year. Like Sarah, she isn’t sure what her job prospects will be in a country that’s struggling to cope with a rapid rise in coronavirus cases.”We are sacrificing a lot to move. It will be expensive,” she said. “We want our children to study in a country that offers more freedom.””Illegal ideas” Last month, Hong Kong authorities took away a teacher’s registration for life for allegedly “spreading the idea of Hong Kong independence” in class. Authorities did not give details about the classroom discussion, but local media reported that the teacher showed students a TV documentary, featuring pro-independence figure Andy Chan. They were then asked to answer questions from a worksheet about freedom of speech and proposals for Hong Kong independence. In response to the incident, Chief Executive Carrie Lam said “illegal ideas” and “pro-independence” concepts cannot exist in schools. Beijing has long blamed the Hong Kong education system for radicalizing its students. In particular, pro-Beijing lawmakers condemn Liberal Studies — a required high school civics course that was introduced in 2009 to strengthen critical thinking and knowledge of contemporary issues. It covers topics including modern China, political participation and Hong Kong identity. Pro-Beijing voices have criticized the course materials for being biased and encouraging students to join anti-government protests. Publishers of textbooks for the course have rewritten parts of it, removing criticism of the Chinese government and the term “separation of powers.” Pro-Beijing lawmaker Regina Ip says the changes to education will teach students a more balanced history of China, rather than stifle conversation. “The basic purpose is to bring up our children to at least have proper respect for our country,” Ip said. “I have received complaints about teachers using the classroom as a vehicle of the political beliefs, even stirring up hatred of police, of the Chinese government, of the people of China, portraying them as dirty, backward, repressive.”Education authorities received 247 misconduct complaints about teachers who allegedly “disseminated hate remarks” and “advocated violence on social media,” from last June to this August. Earlier this month, the Hong Kong education minister said his department had investigated several teachers and students for allegedly bullying the children of police officers, who were on the frontlines of last year’s protests. According to local media reports, a secondary school teacher’s contract was terminated because she allowed students to perform pro-democracy anthem “Glory to Hong Kong.” According to Ip, the song “amounts to sowing the seeds of Hong Kong independence in young minds.” This summer, the city’s Education Bureau issued new guidelines, requiring Hong Kong schools to play the Chinese anthem during important holidays, and to report to the police those who insult the song. Ip says “many countries” teach their kids to memorize the constitution and sing the national anthem. “I think there is no basic difference,” she added.For years, Beijing has tried to impose patriotic education in Hong Kong. Joshua Wong, a prominent Hong Kong activist and former leader of the 2014 Umbrella Movement, created a student activist group called Scholarism when he was in high school. In 2012, he rallied 120,000 people to occupy the Hong Kong government’s headquarters to protest a Beijing-backed plan to introduce patriotic, pro-Communist national and moral education lessons in the city’s public schools. Protesters argued the changes amounted to brainwashing, and their actions forced the city’s beleaguered leaders to withdraw the proposed curriculum.That was the last time the students of Hong Kong won against Beijing.Since 2012, one of Beijing’s primary aims has been to create a generation of patriotic and loyal Hong Kong youth, according to Lester Shum, onetime deputy secretary-general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students and now an elected lawmaker. He said the current changes could create a new generation who will be “totally brainwashed, not knowing about the wrongdoings from the authorities.”But Shum says it’s unclear how successful those aims will be, since students can still access free information from the internet and the press. Next generationRowena He, an associate professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has witnessed these types of changes to an education system play out before. In the spring of 1989, millions took to the streets in Beijing and other cities across China to demand political reforms. The nationwide movement ended on June 4, when the People’s Liberation Army opened fire on its own people Beijing’s city center. After that, the Communist Party launched a patriotic education campaign to instil national pride and change young people’s attitudes towards Western powers. Today, few young people within mainland China know about the Tiananmen massacre, or pro-democracy protests, because the event is censored from the Chinese internet and books, and is not taught in schools. Many of those who know about the incident believe in the official version that the crackdown was necessary for China’s stability and rise. But in Hong Kong it will take far longer to “brainwash the younger generation,” He said. “Hong Kong has a strong civil society,” she explained.He is the author of “Tiananmen Exiles: Voices of the Struggle for Democracy in China.” For years, she taught seminars on the movement in American universities before moving to Hong Kong last year. She was looking forward to attending the June 4 commemoration for the first time in Hong Kong, the only place on Chinese soil where an annual vigil is held. But authorities banned the event in June for the first time in 30 years, citing coronavirus concerns. Many fear it will never take place again. A smaller crowd of people still gathered in Victoria Park this year, leading to the arrest of dozens of democracy activists who were accused of knowingly taking part in an “unauthorized assembly.”He still teaches her students about the Tiananmen massacre and historical episodes deemed taboo by the Communist Party, but fears of repercussions have followed her throughout her career. In July, the University of Hong Kong fired Benny Tai, a prominent law professor and pro-democracy activist, who said academic staff in the city “are no longer free to make controversial statements.” Local media have reported instances of professors with pro-democracy views whose contracts have been denied.”We never know what the red line is, that’s the root of censorship and self-censorship,” Rowena He said.On June 4 this year, He took her students to a replica of the “Goddess of Democracy” standing at the heart of the Chinese University campus. The original Goddess of Democracy was a 10-meter tall statue hastily made by students in 1989 that was destroyed by the Chinese military in Tiananmen Square. The figure is now a global symbol of defiance. “Those in power can easily manipulate history and erase memory,” He said. “I try my best to speak out the truth — that’s the resistance.”Some of Rowena’s students plan to leave Hong Kong after graduation. One of them, Tyler, who asked to use a pseudonym to avoid repercussions, said he will move to the UK to pursue graduate studies in Chinese history, because of the “censorship problems” in Hong Kong. “The narrative in Hong Kong and China is quite controlled,” he said. Tyler took part in student demonstrations at the Chinese University of Hong Kong last year, which became the center of violent clashes between police and protesters. Students set up barricades against police who fired tear gas. Protesters were arrested in large numbers. “Under the security law, many of us are afraid of being spied on by police,” Tyler said. “So now we are quite worried, but I still saw a lot of students who are willing to sacrifice themselves.”Some students are determined to stay in Hong Kong. One of Tyler’s classmates plans to become a primary school teacher, so she can keep alive the memory of important events, such as the 1989 crackdown.”We need someone to continue to teach the next generation and continue to tell them what is right and wrong, so not just let them to be brainwashed by the government,” said the student, who didn’t want to be named for fear of being targeted by authorities.But Sarah, the teacher who is moving her family to the UK, does not want to wait to see what happens to the next generation. Her biggest fear isn’t what’s happening in Hong Kong currently, but what could happen in decades to come. By leaving Hong Kong now, she’s hoping her son won’t have to face a difficult decision in the future about whether to abandon the only city he knows.

Continue Reading

World News

Tropical storm forecast to hit storm-ravaged Central America as a hurricane

‘);$vidEndSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–active’);}};CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;var configObj = {thumb: ‘none’,video: ‘weather/2020/11/14/weather-tropical-storm-iota-forecast-central-america-flood-threat.cnn’,width: ‘100%’,height: ‘100%’,section: ‘domestic’,profile: ‘expansion’,network: ‘cnn’,markupId: ‘large-media_0’,adsection: ‘const-article-pagetop’,frameWidth: ‘100%’,frameHeight: ‘100%’,posterImageOverride: {“mini”:{“width”:220,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-small-169.jpg”,”height”:124},”xsmall”:{“width”:307,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-medium-plus-169.jpg”,”height”:173},”small”:{“width”:460,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-large-169.jpg”,”height”:259},”medium”:{“width”:780,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-exlarge-169.jpg”,”height”:438},”large”:{“width”:1100,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-super-169.jpg”,”height”:619},”full16x9″:{“width”:1600,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-full-169.jpg”,”height”:900},”mini1x1″:{“width”:120,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-small-11.jpg”,”height”:120}}},autoStartVideo = false,isVideoReplayClicked = false,callbackObj,containerEl,currentVideoCollection = [],currentVideoCollectionId = ”,isLivePlayer = false,mediaMetadataCallbacks,mobilePinnedView = null,moveToNextTimeout,mutePlayerEnabled = false,nextVideoId = ”,nextVideoUrl = ”,turnOnFlashMessaging = false,videoPinner,videoEndSlateImpl;if (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === false) {autoStartVideo = true;if (autoStartVideo === true) {if (turnOnFlashMessaging…

Published

on

By

Tropical storm forecast to hit storm-ravaged Central America as a hurricane

‘);$vidEndSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–active’);}};CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;var configObj = {thumb: ‘none’,video: ‘weather/2020/11/14/weather-tropical-storm-iota-forecast-central-america-flood-threat.cnn’,width: ‘100%’,height: ‘100%’,section: ‘domestic’,profile: ‘expansion’,network: ‘cnn’,markupId: ‘large-media_0’,adsection: ‘const-article-pagetop’,frameWidth: ‘100%’,frameHeight: ‘100%’,posterImageOverride: {“mini”:{“width”:220,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-small-169.jpg”,”height”:124},”xsmall”:{“width”:307,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-medium-plus-169.jpg”,”height”:173},”small”:{“width”:460,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-large-169.jpg”,”height”:259},”medium”:{“width”:780,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-exlarge-169.jpg”,”height”:438},”large”:{“width”:1100,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-super-169.jpg”,”height”:619},”full16x9″:{“width”:1600,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-full-169.jpg”,”height”:900},”mini1x1″:{“width”:120,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201114101700-weather-tropical-storm-iota-white-satellite-11142020-small-11.jpg”,”height”:120}}},autoStartVideo = false,isVideoReplayClicked = false,callbackObj,containerEl,currentVideoCollection = [],currentVideoCollectionId = ”,isLivePlayer = false,mediaMetadataCallbacks,mobilePinnedView = null,moveToNextTimeout,mutePlayerEnabled = false,nextVideoId = ”,nextVideoUrl = ”,turnOnFlashMessaging = false,videoPinner,videoEndSlateImpl;if (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === false) {autoStartVideo = true;if (autoStartVideo === true) {if (turnOnFlashMessaging === true) {autoStartVideo = false;containerEl = jQuery(document.getElementById(configObj.markupId));CNN.VideoPlayer.showFlashSlate(containerEl);} else {CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = true;}}}configObj.autostart = CNN.Features.enableAutoplayBlock ? false : autoStartVideo;CNN.VideoPlayer.setPlayerProperties(configObj.markupId, autoStartVideo, isLivePlayer, isVideoReplayClicked, mutePlayerEnabled);CNN.VideoPlayer.setFirstVideoInCollection(currentVideoCollection, configObj.markupId);videoEndSlateImpl = new CNN.VideoEndSlate(‘large-media_0’);function findNextVideo(currentVideoId) {var i,vidObj;if (currentVideoId && jQuery.isArray(currentVideoCollection) && currentVideoCollection.length > 0) {for (i = 0; i 0) {videoEndSlateImpl.showEndSlateForContainer();if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.disable();}}}}callbackObj = {onPlayerReady: function (containerId) {var playerInstance,containerClassId = ‘#’ + containerId;CNN.VideoPlayer.handleInitialExpandableVideoState(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.handleAdOnCVPVisibilityChange(containerId, CNN.pageVis.isDocumentVisible());if (CNN.Features.enableMobileWebFloatingPlayer &&Modernizr &&(Modernizr.phone || Modernizr.mobile || Modernizr.tablet) &&CNN.VideoPlayer.getLibraryName(containerId) === ‘fave’ &&jQuery(containerClassId).parents(‘.js-pg-rail-tall__head’).length > 0 &&CNN.contentModel.pageType === ‘article’) {playerInstance = FAVE.player.getInstance(containerId);mobilePinnedView = new CNN.MobilePinnedView({element: jQuery(containerClassId),enabled: false,transition: CNN.MobileWebFloatingPlayer.transition,onPin: function () {playerInstance.hideUI();},onUnpin: function () {playerInstance.showUI();},onPlayerClick: function () {if (mobilePinnedView) {playerInstance.enterFullscreen();playerInstance.showUI();}},onDismiss: function() {CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer.disable();playerInstance.pause();}});/* Storing pinned view on CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer So that all players can see the single pinned player */CNN.Videx = CNN.Videx || {};CNN.Videx.mobile = CNN.Videx.mobile || {};CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer = mobilePinnedView;}if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (jQuery(containerClassId).parents(‘.js-pg-rail-tall__head’).length) {videoPinner = new CNN.VideoPinner(containerClassId);videoPinner.init();} else {CNN.VideoPlayer.hideThumbnail(containerId);}}},onContentEntryLoad: function(containerId, playerId, contentid, isQueue) {CNN.VideoPlayer.showSpinner(containerId);},onContentPause: function (containerId, playerId, videoId, paused) {if (mobilePinnedView) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleMobilePinnedPlayerStates(containerId, paused);}},onContentMetadata: function (containerId, playerId, metadata, contentId, duration, width, height) {var endSlateLen = jQuery(document.getElementById(containerId)).parent().find(‘.js-video__end-slate’).eq(0).length;CNN.VideoSourceUtils.updateSource(containerId, metadata);if (endSlateLen > 0) {videoEndSlateImpl.fetchAndShowRecommendedVideos(metadata);}},onAdPlay: function (containerId, cvpId, token, mode, id, duration, blockId, adType) {/* Dismissing the pinnedPlayer if another video players plays an Ad */CNN.VideoPlayer.dismissMobilePinnedPlayer(containerId);clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);videoPinner.animateDown();}}},onAdPause: function (containerId, playerId, token, mode, id, duration, blockId, adType, instance, isAdPause) {if (mobilePinnedView) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleMobilePinnedPlayerStates(containerId, isAdPause);}},onTrackingFullscreen: function (containerId, PlayerId, dataObj) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleFullscreenChange(containerId, dataObj);if (mobilePinnedView &&typeof dataObj === ‘object’ &&FAVE.Utils.os === ‘iOS’ && !dataObj.fullscreen) {jQuery(document).scrollTop(mobilePinnedView.getScrollPosition());playerInstance.hideUI();}},onContentPlay: function (containerId, cvpId, event) {var playerInstance,prevVideoId;if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘restoreEpicAds’);}clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);videoPinner.animateDown();}}},onContentReplayRequest: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);var $endSlate = jQuery(document.getElementById(containerId)).parent().find(‘.js-video__end-slate’).eq(0);if ($endSlate.length > 0) {$endSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–active’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’);}}}},onContentBegin: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.enable();}/* Dismissing the pinnedPlayer if another video players plays a video. */CNN.VideoPlayer.dismissMobilePinnedPlayer(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.mutePlayer(containerId);if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘removeEpicAds’);}CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoSourceUtils.clearSource(containerId);jQuery(document).triggerVideoContentStarted();},onContentComplete: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘restoreFreewheel’);}navigateToNextVideo(contentId, containerId);},onContentEnd: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(false);}}},onCVPVisibilityChange: function (containerId, cvpId, visible) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleAdOnCVPVisibilityChange(containerId, visible);}};if (typeof configObj.context !== ‘string’ || configObj.context.length 0) {configObj.adsection = window.ssid;}CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;CNN.VideoPlayer.getLibrary(configObj, callbackObj, isLivePlayer);});CNN.INJECTOR.scriptComplete(‘videodemanddust’);

Continue Reading

World News

What inspired you the most? Vote for your favorite

Published

on

By

What inspired you the most? Vote for your favorite

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!