Connect with us
[adrotate group="1"]

Latest News

Live: Trump battles with Democrats as impeachment pressure grows – CNNPolitics

President Trump says he told Democratic leaders at the White House on Wednesday he couldn’t work with them while they were pursuing investigations into him and his administration.”I’ve said from the beginning — right from the beginning — you probably can’t go down two tracks. You can go down the investigation track or you can go down…

Published

on

Live: Trump battles with Democrats as impeachment pressure grows – CNNPolitics

President Trump says he told Democratic leaders at the White House on Wednesday he couldn’t work with them while they were pursuing investigations into him and his administration.”I’ve said from the beginning — right from the beginning — you probably can’t go down two tracks. You can go down the investigation track or you can go down the investment track,” Trump said in last-minute remarks in the Rose Garden.Trump was supposed to have a meeting with Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this morning on infrastructure. That meeting lasted just a few minutes: During it, Trump told them he couldn’t work with them until their investigations are over.”I walked into the room and I told Sen. Schumer, Speaker Pelosi, I want to do infrastructure,” he said. “But you can’t do it under these circumstances.”He said he message to the lawmakers was “get these phony investigations over with.”President Trump called the investigation into Russian interference in the US election a “takedown attempt” that ended with conclusions that there was no collusion. “So here is the bottom line: There was no collusion. There was no obstruction. We’ve been doing this since I’ve been President,” Trump said.Then, Trump criticized the media for how it covered the investigation. This whole thing was a takedown attempt at the President of The United States. And honestly you ought to be ashamed of yourselves the way you report it so dishonestly,” he said.White House staff can be seen grinning along the colonnade while President Trump speaks. President Trump, speaking from the Rose Garden, addressed Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s comments that she believes the President engaged in a “cover-up.””I don’t do cover-ups,” Trump said.Remember: Pelosi and Trump were supposed to meet at the White House at 11 a.m. to talk about infrastructure.Here’s what he said:”I came here to do a on infrastructure meeting with Democrats — not really thinking that they wanted to do infrastructure or anything else other than investigate. And I just saw that Nancy Pelosi, just before our meeting made a statement that we believe that ‘the President of the United States is engaged in a cover-up.’ It turns out I’m the most — I think most of you would agree to this — I’m the most transparent president probably in the history of this country.”President Trump just convened last-minute remarks in the Rose Garden to lambast Democrats for their oversight efforts.We are covering that live now.As she left the Capitol to head to a meeting at the White House, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi appeared to blame the media for pushing a narrative that the Democrats are divided.”You all see something that is really not happening in our caucus. Our members honor their oath of office, have different views, but there’s no division,” she said.Pelosi and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer are scheduled to meet with Trump this morning about infrastructure.What this is all about: A growing number of Democrats are calling for Congress to begin impeachment proceedings against President Trump — a move Pelosi has not endorsed. For months, Pelosi has repeatedly shown hesitance to begin impeachment proceedings against the President, arguing it will divide the country.Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi told her Democratic colleagues this morning to not raise money of their positions on impeachment.Where Pelosi stands on impeachment: She has repeatedly shown hesitance to begin impeachment proceedings against President Trump, justifying her position by saying that going after Trump is not “worth” the division impeachment would bring to the country.”Impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country. And he’s just not worth it,” she said in March.
Read More

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code

Latest News

Analysis: Why it could be a Biden blowout in November

(CNN)Poll of the week: A new ABC News/Washington Post poll from Minnesota finds Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden with a 57% to 41% lead over President Donald Trump among likely voters. Two other Minnesota polls released over the last few weeks by CBS News/YouGov and New York Times/Siena College have Biden up by nine points.…

Published

on

By

Analysis: Why it could be a Biden blowout in November

(CNN)Poll of the week: A new ABC News/Washington Post poll from Minnesota finds Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden with a 57% to 41% lead over President Donald Trump among likely voters. Two other Minnesota polls released over the last few weeks by CBS News/YouGov and New York Times/Siena College have Biden up by nine points. What’s the point: The Trump campaign has made a significant investment into turning Minnesota red, after Trump lost it by 1.5 points in 2016. The polling shows his efforts are not working.They are part of a larger sign suggesting that Trump still has a ways to go to win not just in Minnesota but over the electoral map at-large. If his campaign was truly competitive at this point, he’d likely be closer in Minnesota. One day Trump may get there, and he definitely has a shot of winning with still over a month to go in the campaign. Yet, it should also be pointed out that despite folks like me usually focusing on how Trump can close the gap with Biden and put new states into play, there’s another side to this equation. There is also the distinct possibility that Biden blows Trump out. It’s something I’ve noted before, and the Washington Post’s David Byler pointed out a few weeks ago. If you were to look at the polling right now, there’s a pretty clear picture. Biden has leads of somewhere between five and eight points in a number of states Trump won four years ago: Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Those plus the states Hillary Clinton won get Biden to about 290 electoral votes. If you add on the other states where Biden has at least a nominal edge in the averages (Florida and North Carolina), Biden is above 330 electoral votes. That’s not quite at blowout levels, but look at the polling in places like Georgia, Iowa, Ohio and Texas. We’re not really talking about those places right now, even though one or both campaigns have fairly major advertising investments planned down the stretch in all four. The polling there has been fairly limited, but it’s been pretty consistent. Biden is quite competitive. If you were to do an aggregation of the polls that are available in those states, Biden’s down maybe a point or two at most. In other words, Biden’s much closer to leading in Georgia, Iowa, Ohio and Texas than Trump is in Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, let alone Minnesota. Indeed, it’s quite possible he’s actually up in either Georgia, Iowa, Ohio or Texas, and we just don’t know it because there isn’t enough fresh data. For example, Clinton only lost in Georgia by five points in 2016, and Biden’s doing about five points better in the national polls than she did in the final vote. It would make sense, therefore, that Biden’s quite close to Trump there at this point. Wins in any of those states by Biden could push his Electoral College tally up to about 340 electoral votes or higher, depending on which states Biden wins. Victories in all four would push him well over 400 electoral votes.Models such as those produced by FiveThirtyEight show just how possible it is for Biden to blow Trump out of the water. The model actually anticipates a better chance of Trump closing his deficit than Biden expanding it. Even so, Biden has a better chance (about 45%) of winning 340 electoral votes than Trump has of winning the election (about 25%). Biden’s chance of taking 400 electoral votes is pretty much the same of Trump winning. Of course, the ramifications of a Biden blowout versus a small Biden win aren’t anywhere close to being the same as a small Biden win versus a small Trump win. It’s easy to understand why the focus of a potential error is on Trump benefiting from it. In 2012, however, we saw the leading candidate (Barack Obama) win pretty much all of the close states.In fact, there’s no reason to think that any polling error at the end of the campaign won’t benefit the candidate who is already ahead. That’s happened plenty of times. Whether it be Obama in 2012 or most infamously Ronald Reagan in 1980. The thing to keep in mind is that it is possible one candidate runs the board because polling errors are correlated across states. That’s exactly what happened in 2016, when Trump won most of the close states. This year we just don’t know how it’s going to play out. Just keep in mind that the potential change in this race could go to Biden’s benefit as well as Trump’s. Before we bid adieu: The theme song of the week is the closing credits to Murphy Brown.
Read More

Continue Reading

Latest News

At least 40 rounds were fired during shooting that left two dead at a party in New York

(CNN)At least 40 rounds were fired during a shooting that left two people dead and over a dozen others injured at a house party in upstate New York, authorities said.The party in Rochester started early Saturday as an invite-only event before it eventually grew in size after two nearby parties “infiltrated” the house. Three or…

Published

on

By

At least 40 rounds were fired during shooting that left two dead at a party in New York

(CNN)At least 40 rounds were fired during a shooting that left two people dead and over a dozen others injured at a house party in upstate New York, authorities said.The party in Rochester started early Saturday as an invite-only event before it eventually grew in size after two nearby parties “infiltrated” the house. Three or four people had handguns, Capt. Frank Umbrino said. The two people killed and 14 wounded were in their late teens to early 20s. Police responded to calls of gunshots around 12:25 a.m. and were met with 100 to 200 people attempting to flee on foot and in vehicles, he said. Those killed did not live at the home and they were not the intended targets, Umbrino said. No suspects were in custody, and no motive was immediately known.”A number of our young people — babies — that came to just hang out a little while … left running for their lives. And that’s just something that we cannot have happen,” Mayor Lovely Warren said during a visit to the neighborhood Saturday. The party’s host told her she “invited a couple friends over, who invited a couple friends over who invited a couple friends over.””And it just got out of control. She’s just traumatized,” Warren said.Warren appealed for calm and healing in a city recently roiled by protests in a different high-profile case — the death of Daniel Prude after an encounter with police earlier this year.The party took place despite several restrictions on gatherings. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, the city has told residents to limit social gatherings to household members and not to gather in groups.Additionally, since July, the city has banned gatherings of more than five people from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. to curb what the city said was a rise in violence.Police were not aware of the party beforehand, and had not received any calls for disturbance, Acting Police Chief Mark Simmons said.The shooting comes as the city and police department deal with the case of Prude, who died in March after Rochester police pinned him to the ground. The release of body camera footage this month led to protests and accusations that local leaders hid details about Prude’s death from the public.This week, Simmons succeeded the previous chief, who was fired over the fallout. A New York City law firm is leading an independent investigation into the city’s handling of the case. Also, New York ‘s attorney general has said she would empanel a grand jury to investigate Prude’s death.CNN’s Jason Hanna, Christina Maxouris, Alec Snyder and Alta Spells contributed to this report.
Read More

Continue Reading

Latest News

Thai activists install symbolic plaque

Published

on

By

Thai activists install symbolic plaque

Image copyright
Reuters

Anti-government protesters have installed a plaque declaring Thailand “belongs to the people”, in a bold show of opposition to the monarchy. The plaque was laid near Bangkok’s Grand Palace in the latest challenge to Thai King Maha Vajiralongkorn.Student-led protests calling for reform of the country’s monarchy and political system have been going on since July.Saturday saw one of the biggest protests in years, with thousands defying authorities to demand change.The calls for royal reform at these protests are particularly sensitive in Thailand, with criticism of the monarchy punishable by long prison sentences.Protesters are also demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, who took power in a 2014 coup and won disputed elections last year.
Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionThousands gathered in the Thai capital for Saturday’s protestsOn Sunday morning, student activists cemented a commemorative “People’s Plaque” close to a field known as Sanam Luang, or Royal Field. The plaque, dated 20 September, 2020, proclaims in Thai: “The people have expressed the intention that this country belongs to the people, and not the king.”Organisers said the plaque was a replacement for another marking the end of absolute monarchy in the 1930s, which went missing in 2017.Cheers erupted as activists installed the new plaque, with protesters chanting: “Down with feudalism, long live the people.”Police did not intervene and there were no reports of violence. A spokesman for the Thai government told Reuters news agency police would not use violence against protesters.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Student protest leaders handed over a letter of demands to the king’s Royal Guard police

Later on, protesters who had planned to march to Government House were blocked from doing so by hundreds of unarmed police manning crowd control barriers.Instead, the protesters marched to hand a letter of demands for reform of the monarchy to the king’s Royal Guard police.Protest leaders declared victory after saying Royal Guard police had agreed to pass on their demands to police headquarters. There has been no comment from the police.”Our greatest victory in the two days is to show that ordinary people like us can send a letter to royals,” protest leader Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak said, telling crowds to return for another demonstration next week.Why are there protests?Thailand has a long history of political unrest and protest, but a new wave began in February after a court ordered a fledgling pro-democracy opposition party to dissolve.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Protesters were on the streets of Bangkok again on Sunday

The Future Forward Party (FFP) had proved particularly popular with young, first-time voters and garnered the third-largest share of parliamentary seats in the March 2019 election, which was won by the incumbent military leadership.Protests were re-energised in June when prominent pro-democracy activist Wanchalearm Satsaksit went missing in Cambodia, where he had been in exile since the 2014 military coup. His whereabouts remain unknown and protesters accuse the Thai state of orchestrating his kidnapping – something the police and government have denied. Since July there have been regular student-led street protests. Demonstrators have demanded that the government headed by Prime Minister Chan-ocha, a former army chief who seized power in the coup, be dissolved; that the constitution be rewritten; that the authorities stop harassing critics.What is different this time?The demands of protesters took an unprecedented turn last month when a 10-point call for reform to the monarchy was read out at one rally. The move sent shockwaves through a country which is taught from birth to revere and love the monarchy and fear the consequences of talking about it.

Image copyright
EPA

Image caption

Protesters want Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha to step down

The young woman who delivered the manifesto, Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul, has said their intention “is not to destroy the monarchy but to modernise it, to adapt it to our society”.But she and her fellow activists have been accused of “chung chart” – a Thai term meaning “hatred of the nation” – and they say they are deeply fearful of the consequences of doing “the right thing” by speaking out.What are the laws protecting the monarchy?Each of Thailand’s 19 constitutions of modern times has stated, at the top, that: “The King shall be enthroned in a position of revered worship” and that “no person shall expose the King to any sort of accusation or action”.These provisions are backed by article 112 of the criminal code, known as the lese-majeste law, which subjects anyone criticising the royal family to secret trials and long prison sentences.The definition of what constitutes an insult to the monarchy is unclear and human rights groups say the law has often been used as a political tool to curb free speech and opposition calls for reform and change.The law had been increasingly enforced in the years after the 2014 coup, although it has slowed since King Vajiralongkorn let it be known he no longer wanted it to be so widely used. But observers say the government has used other legal routes, including the sedition law, to target dissent.

More on Thailand’s protests:
Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionThe anti-government rally in Bangkok is thought to be the biggest in Thailand for six years
Read More

Continue Reading
error: Content is protected !!