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German police, Ramstein MPs oversee boy’s rescue from shaft

BERLIN — Police say they have rescued a 17-month-old boy three hours after he fell into a three-meter (nearly 10-foot) shaft in western Germany. Rescue workers were called on Monday afternoon after the boy lifted a cover from the empty conduit while playing with his brother and fell inside the shaft. German and U.S. military…

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German police, Ramstein MPs oversee boy’s rescue from shaft

BERLIN — Police say they have rescued a 17-month-old boy three hours after he fell into a three-meter (nearly 10-foot) shaft in western Germany.

Rescue workers were called on Monday afternoon after the boy lifted a cover from the empty conduit while playing with his brother and fell inside the shaft.

German and U.S. military police helped oversee the operation in the village of Erzenhausen, which is near the United States’ Ramstein Air Base.

Fire personnel used a small excavator to uncover the conduit as far as possible and then opened it up to free the toddler. The child was taken to a local hospital for observation and reported to be uninjured.

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After 6 years of attempts, Marine master guns finally wins Recon Challenge

CAMP PENDLETON, California ― April 30 was a long day full of misery, hills and hot California sun, but with an impressive time of nine hours and 27 minutes, Master Gunnery Sgt. Cory Paskvan and Maj. Morgan Jordan came away as victors of the 12th annual Recon Challenge. In almost 25 miles, the Recon Challenge…

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After 6 years of attempts, Marine master guns finally wins Recon Challenge

CAMP PENDLETON, California ― April 30 was a long day full of misery, hills and hot California sun, but with an impressive time of nine hours and 27 minutes, Master Gunnery Sgt. Cory Paskvan and Maj. Morgan Jordan came away as victors of the 12th annual Recon Challenge. In almost 25 miles, the Recon Challenge pushes teams of two through some of the most grueling events in the world of Marine reconnaissance. This was the master gunnery sergeant’s sixth time running the course. Though he has racked up three second place finishes, he had never won the race. The thought of finally getting Paskvan the win kept Jordan going through the final challenge. “That drove me at points on the mountain, once we took the lead I didn’t want to let him down,” he said. ‘A marathon with a 50-pound ruck’ The race started before dawn with 22 current and former members of a Marine Reconnaissance Battalion lined up on the beach of Camp Pendleton, California, as the waves came rolling in. Get the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup Don’t miss the top Marine Corps stories, delivered each afternoon (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup. After a brief countdown the teams were off jumping into the cold surf to start their day off with a 1,000-meter ocean swim. The teams hiked through Camp Pendleton, California, stopping at a total of 10 stations to complete a variety of events, including a pistol and rifle shoot, knot ties in the pool, two circuits of the obstacle course and a simulated casualty evacuation. “It’s a marathon with a 50-pound ruck on your back, then we throw in a lot of aquatic events,” said Gunnery Sgt. Franklin Simmons, a recon instructor at the Reconnaissance Training Company and the designer of this year’s challenge. The teams traversed the course carrying the name of a fallen recon Marine on their backs along with the Marine’s dog tags. “It is a huge event that honors our Gold Star families and our fallen reconnaissance men who have died,” Simmons added. That day the weather provided another unexpected challenge. The normally pleasant California weather went south around mid-morning, and the sun started to blaze while the teams started their first truly daunting climb, several hundred yards up one of Camp Pendleton’s famed hills. Teams struggle up the first climb of the 12th annual recon challenge on April 30. (Philip Athey/Staff) Once at the top of the hill the Marines were required to set up a radio before heading to the next station. For most of the day Recon Training Company Executive Officer Capt. Benjamin Lowring and Basic Reconnaissance Course Instructor Staff Sgt. Andy Meltz held the lead, but when they blew by an unmarked turn heading to the range, they lost a crucial 10 minutes. They were still in the lead when they made their way to the pool for what might have been the hardest event of the day. The second to last event saw teams drag a 7-ton tire underwater from the deep end of the Horno pool to the shallow end. To complete the event the teams had to lift the tire over a 12-foot underwater ledge that separates the shallow and deep end of the pool. Meltz and Lowring jumped into the pool with a roughly 10 minute lead, but they struggled to lift the 7-ton tire over the ledge. After what felt like an infinite number of attempts, using ropes and pure muscle to lift the tire while fighting through cramps and exhaustion, the team finally was able to get it over and complete the course. But before they even got out of the pool, Paskvan and Jordan were on their heels, blazing through the event ― finishing in just about two minutes. Marines take a quick break after setting up and calling in a radio check as part of the recon challenge. (Philip Athey/Staff) Paskvan credited his brother, a former NCAA Division 1 athlete, for his water skills. “He kicked my ass in the pool,” Paskvan said, as he rushed to get dressed to continue on with the hike. Despite getting out of the pools second, Paskvan and Jordan were the first team to continue their hike. “For me it was cardiac hill, the climb we did right after we left the pool,” Jordan told reporters after the race. “It was late in the race and it was very hot at the time and I was just exhausted.” Though they had a safe lead, Paskvan said there were a “few moments where he was a little worried.” ‘We do it for them’ After crossing the finish line, the Marines kneel down and place the dog tags of the fallen on a battlefield cross. “It really puts it in perspective, it really gives you the why we’re doing thig, the remembrance of those who have fallen before us,” Lt. Col. Carin Calvin, the commanding officer of the Advanced Infantry Training Battalion, said after the event. The first-place finishers were running for Lt. Col. Kevin M. Shea, who was killed Sept. 14, 2004 in Fallujah, Iraq, when he was hit by in rocket attack only a few months before returning home. Shea’s widow was at the finish line cheering on the winning team as they knelt before the battlefield cross. “This year Lt. Col. Shea’s wife, she came out, it made it a little bit more special to actually be able to know them,” Jordan said. “We do it for them, so when you get to that finish line and you have a chance to hang the dog tag it is a very powerful moment.” After finishing the two Marines give the marker carrying Shea’s name to the widow as an added remembrance. Paskvan said he had served with most of the men whose names were carried in the Recon Challenge, making the annual event particularly important to him. “It means a tremendous amount to me to be represented for them to be represented and for myself to carry several of those Marines through the challenge being that I’ve served with a fair amount of them.

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US military trashes unwanted gear in Afghanistan, sells as scrap

BAGRAM, Afghanistan — The twisted remains of several all-terrain vehicles leaned precariously inside Baba Mir’s sprawling scrapyard, alongside smashed shards that were once generators, tank tracks that have been dismantled into chunks of metal, and mountains of tents reduced to sliced up fabric. It’s all U.S. military equipment. The Americans are dismantling their portion of…

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US military trashes unwanted gear in Afghanistan, sells as scrap

BAGRAM, Afghanistan — The twisted remains of several all-terrain vehicles leaned precariously inside Baba Mir’s sprawling scrapyard, alongside smashed shards that were once generators, tank tracks that have been dismantled into chunks of metal, and mountains of tents reduced to sliced up fabric. It’s all U.S. military equipment. The Americans are dismantling their portion of nearby Bagram Air Base, their largest remaining outpost in Afghanistan, and anything that they are not taking home or giving to the Afghan military, they destroy as completely as possible. They do so as a security measure, to ensure equipment doesn’t fall into militant hands. But to Mir and the dozens of other scrap sellers around Bagram, it’s an infuriating waste. “What they are doing is a betrayal of Afghans. They should leave,” said Mir. “Like they have destroyed this vehicle, they have destroyed us.” As the last few thousand U.S. and NATO troops head out the door, ending their own 20-year war in Afghanistan, they are deep into a massive logistical undertaking, packing up bases around the country. They leave behind an Afghan population where many are deeply frustrated and angry. They feel abandoned to a legacy they blame at least in part on the Americans — a deeply corrupt U.S.-backed government and growing instability that could burst into brutal new phase of civil war. The bitterness of the scrapyard owners is only a small part of that, and it’s somewhat self-interested: they’re angry in part because they could have profited more selling intact equipment. But it’s been a common theme for the past two traumatic and destructive decades where actions the U.S. touted as necessary or beneficial only disillusioned Afghans who felt the repercussions. At Bagram, northwest of the capital Kabul, and other bases, U.S. forces are inventorying equipment that will be returned to America. Tens of thousands of metal containers, about 20 feet long, are being shipped out on C-17 cargo planes or by road through Pakistan and Central Asia. As of last week, 60 C-17s packed with equipment had already left Afghanistan. Officials are being secretive about what stays and what goes. Most of what is being shipped home is sensitive equipment never intended to stay behind, say U.S. Defense and Western officials who spoke on condition of anonymity in order to speak freely about departing troops. Sign up for the Early Bird Brief Get the military’s most comprehensive news and information every morning. (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Early Bird Brief. Other equipment including helicopters, military vehicles, weapons and ammunition will be handed over to Afghanistan’s National Defense and Security Forces. Some bases will be given to them as well. One of those most recently handed over was the New Antonik base in Helmand province, where Taliban are said to control roughly 80 percent of the rural area. Destined for the scrap heap are equipment and vehicles that can neither be repaired nor transferred to Afghanistan’s security forces because of poor condition. So far about 1,300 pieces of equipment have been destroyed, said a U.S. military statement. There will be more before the final deadline for departure on Sept. 11, said one U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the media. The practice is not new. The same was done in 2014, when thousands of troops withdrew as the U.S. and NATO handed Afghanistan’s security over to Afghans. More than 387 million pounds of scrap from destroyed equipment and vehicles was sold to Afghans for $46.5 million, a spokeswoman for the military’s Defense Logistics Agency in Virginia said at the time. Last month, around the time President Joe Biden announced that America was ending it’s ‘forever war,” Mir paid nearly $40,000 for a container packed with 70 tons of trashed equipment. He’ll make money, he told The Associated Press, but it will be a fraction of what he could have made selling the vehicles if they’d been left intact, even if they weren’t in running condition. The parts would have been sold to the legions of auto repair shops across Afghanistan, he said. That can’t happen now. They’ve been reduced to mangled pieces of metal that Mir sells for a few thousand Afghanis. Sadat, another junk dealer in Bagram, who gave only one name, says similar scrap yards around the country are crammed with ruined U.S. equipment. “They left us nothing,” he said. “They don’t trust us. They have destroyed our country. They are giving us only destruction.” The Western official familiar with the packing up process said U.S. forces face a dilemma: Hand off largely defunct but intact equipment and risk having them fall into hands of enemy forces, or trash them and anger Afghans. To make his point, he recounted a story: Not so long ago, U.S. forces discovered two Hummers that had found their way into enemy hands. They had been refitted and packed with explosives. U.S. troops destroyed the vehicles, and the incident reinforced a policy of trashing equipment. But Afghan scrapyard owners and dozens of others who sifted through the junk in the yard wondered what danger a treadmill could have posed to require it to be torn apart, or the long lengths of fire hose that had been cut to pieces, or the Hesco bags, once used to create large sand-barrier walls, now their powerful mesh fabric sliced and useless. Dozens of tents cut and sliced sat in piles on the scrapyard floors. Nearby were fuel bags and gutted generators, tank tracks and gnarled pieces of metal that looked like the undercarriage of a vehicle. “They destroyed our country and now they are giving us their garbage,” said gray-bearded Hajji Gul, another junk dealer. “What are we to do with this?” AP Writer in Washington Lolita Baldor contributed to this report.

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Desert Storm group makes final funding push to begin construction

Desert Storm Vets Get National Memorial The National Desert Storm and Desert Shield Memorial will be built near the Lincoln and Vietnam Memorials. It is expected to be built in time for the 30th anniversary of the 1991 Gulf War battles. A nonprofit group that has spearheaded efforts to erect a memorial to Operation Desert…

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Desert Storm group makes final funding push to begin construction

Desert Storm Vets Get National Memorial The National Desert Storm and Desert Shield Memorial will be built near the Lincoln and Vietnam Memorials. It is expected to be built in time for the 30th anniversary of the 1991 Gulf War battles. A nonprofit group that has spearheaded efforts to erect a memorial to Operation Desert Storm a short distance from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial has an ambitious goal to raise the last $20 million of funding so that they may break ground on the project this year, the 30th anniversary of the war. Scott Stump, president and CEO of the National Desert Storm War Memorial Association spoke recently with Military Times, updating the status of the project. Congress authorized construction of the memorial in 2014 and President Barack Obama signed that bill into law shortly afterward. President Donald Trump signed a bill that authorized the memorial to be built near the National Mall in Washington. play_circle_filled In 2018, the National Park Service and National Capital Planning Commission recommended the site, which was approved later that year by the Commission of Fine Arts. In February 2019, the association held a site dedication ceremony for the future memorial. Former Vice President Dick Cheney, who served as defense secretary during the war, spoke at the event, as did retired Air Force Gen. Charles Albert “Chuck” Horner, who commanded U.S. and allied air operations during the war. Gathering interest and support for the memorial actually began in 2010. Though it took much of the next decade to get to this point, much of that was to ensure the memorial would be in a prominent spot, near the Vietnam and Korean War memorials. Sign up for the Early Bird Brief Get the military’s most comprehensive news and information every morning (please select a country)United StatesUnited KingdomAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of TheCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’ivoireCroatiaCubaCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-bissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and The GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbia and MontenegroSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and The South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-lesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaViet NamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Subscribe × By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Early Bird Brief. The site location plan for The National Desert Storm War Memorial Association memorial to be built near the National Mall in Washington. (NDSWMA) “Given the fact that the maximum number of people would be able to visit this, we felt location was paramount,” Stump said. That meant limiting some of the early design features that may have risen higher than allowed and also navigating a more lengthy approval process due to the location. “We’re not just interested in visibility, but ‘visit-ability,’” Stump said. Along the way, the foundation raised nearly $10 million of the anticipated $40 million price tag, partly through site award money and nearly half through donations by individuals, businesses, foreign governments and Veterans Service Organizations, according to the NDSWMA. The government of Kuwait has pledged $10 million to the project. That leaves an estimated $20 million to be raised before the groundbreaking can take place, according to federal rules, which require funds before construction commences. The National Desert Storm War Memorial Association design concepts for a memorial to be built near the National Mall in Washington. (NDSWMA) Stump said the organization is pursuing various angles and he is confident that they will meet the funding goal. At the same time, they are awaiting final design approval from the National Endowment for the Arts, National Park Service and Commission of Fine Arts. Those are expected to happen this summer, he said. Some of the same entities approved the conceptual design and final site plan in 2019. But the details of the presentation must be reviewed before they can begin building. The design — a stone, sand-colored sweeping left hook around an elevated pool of water — symbolizes the left hook that U.S.-led coalition forces took coming out of Saudi Arabia and then swept into southern Iraq and Kuwait to outflank Iraqi troops. The original design featured raised walls and did not contain a water feature. The final design will include “detailing quotes, fonts, images, bronze sculptures and carvings,” according to an association statement. The memorial design also features the coalition nation names and relief imagery of the conflict and liberation of Kuwait. The sweeping left hook will ascend from the entrance into the center water feature and embedded wall features.

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