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Elon Musk drops an auto-tune rap about 2016 meme Harambe – CNET

Elon Musk/Twitter Elon Musk: space travel entrepreneur, electric vehicle evangelist, meme connoisseur… rapper? I know that it’s April Fools’ Day in some parts of the world already, but this is beyond a joke — Musk, the SpaceX and Tesla CEO, dropped a surprise on his 25 million Twitter subscribers: a full-fledged, auto-tuned rap song about…

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Elon Musk drops an auto-tune rap about 2016 meme Harambe     – CNET

Elon Musk/Twitter
Elon Musk: space travel entrepreneur, electric vehicle evangelist, meme connoisseur… rapper?
I know that it’s April Fools’ Day in some parts of the world already, but this is beyond a joke — Musk, the SpaceX and Tesla CEO, dropped a surprise on his 25 million Twitter subscribers: a full-fledged, auto-tuned rap song about a gorilla-turned-meme that died in 2016.
Musk tweeted out a Soundcloud link to the song, dubbed “RIP Harambe”, part of a seemingly fabricated music label named “Emo G Records” on Saturday.

The song, featuring a heavy use of auto-tune, begins with the salute “Harambe, we love you” and features the lyrics “R.I.P Harambe, sippin’ on some Bombay, we on our way to Heaven, Amen, Amen”. I can’t see it lighting up the Billboard Hot 100 but perhaps that’s exactly the point. That being said, at time of writing, the song has been streamed 480,000 times.
Subsequent tweets by Musk suggest the song was produced by BloodPop and co-written by Caroline Polachek and emoji artist Yung Jake.
Harambe, a Western lowland gorilla, was shot and killed after a 3-year-old boy fell into his enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo in May 2016. The killing of Harambe ultimately enshrined the animal as one of the year’s biggest viral sensations as social media users flooded sites with memorials. We suggested the Harambe meme be left in 2016 — but it seems Musk wanted to bring it roaring back to life.
If we’re bringing 2016 memes back to life, there are a few that might be applicable here. Crying Jordan, delete your account and even fake news could work?
Musk’s Twitter use has come under fire from the Securities and Exchange Commission in the past year due to a series of tweets where he suggested taking Tesla private. As a result, he was required to have all tweets regarding Tesla preapproved before posting them online, but in March, the SEC wrote that it was stunned to learn Musk had not been seeking approval for numerous tweets made about the manufacturer since the ruling.

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2021 Genesis G80 first drive review: Holy cow is this thing good – Roadshow

Genesis is hell-bent on turning itself into a proper luxury brand, finally able to compete with the German stalwarts. The G80 is one of the first examples of New Genesis, a sedan that’s fully capable of going toe to toe with the Teutonics. Said another way, it’s Genesis’ best product yet. Elegant inside and outThe…

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2021 Genesis G80 first drive review: Holy cow is this thing good     – Roadshow

Genesis is hell-bent on turning itself into a proper luxury brand, finally able to compete with the German stalwarts. The G80 is one of the first examples of New Genesis, a sedan that’s fully capable of going toe to toe with the Teutonics. Said another way, it’s Genesis’ best product yet.

Elegant inside and outThe old G80 was a carryover from when a Genesis wore Hyundai badges, and thus, its luxury wasn’t fully realized. The 2021 model, however, is a clean-sheet approach, and what an approach. In just a couple years, Genesis found its stylistic niche that separates it from the likes of the Mercedes E-Class or BMW 5 Series. Its fastback silhouette gives it a sportier appearance without requiring a full hatchback, and the unique appearance of its running lights — and how their lines continue rearward through the fender’s turn-signal indicators — grants the G80 a cohesiveness that turns a whole lot o’ heads on the road. Yeah, sure, the grille might be a little large, but taken as a whole, I think the G80 looks phenomenal.The interior’s attention to detail is equally impressive. In fact, I’d say the G80’s innards are right up there with the likes of Audi and Mercedes-Benz — hell, I’d put the Korean newcomer ahead of BMW in this regard. The rising door trim meets the dashboard at several points, giving it a seamless look that doesn’t overdo it in terms of competing angles. It’s attractive in its simplicity; the full-leather dashboard is elegant, while a tastefully limited amount of matte-finish wood splits the dash and adorns the center console. Every place my hand goes is met with either leather or thick carpeting. Each control, whether it’s the knurled ends of the wiper and turn signal stalks or the infotainment controller on the center console, feels better than the last. Even the massaging front seats on my Prestige tester sport a unique design and are supremely comfortable.

This interior is the absolute business.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
The rear bench seat offers oodles of legroom and headroom for passengers, with a deployable center armrest that contains additional controls for the infotainment system and the seats. Even without being specifically for chauffeured owners, I’d have no problem relinquishing the controls and soaking up some leather-lined peace in the back seat. Venture even further aft and there’s a trunk with a commendable amount of space, enough for a couple sets of golf clubs or a long trip’s worth of luggage.Quantum-leap tech upgradesSome luxury automakers — cough, Lexus, cough — do their vehicles a disservice by relying on old, hard-to-use tech. Genesis always had a bit of an advantage in this arena by sticking with Hyundai’s excellent infotainment software, but for this new generation of vehicles, the in-car tech feels every bit as flashy and new as the G80 itself.

The wide, 14.5-inch display is gorgeous and the tech within is easy to use.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
The new infotainment system lives in a 14.5-inch screen that dominates the top half of the dashboard, although a smaller 8-incher is standard on lower trims. A reskinned version of Hyundai’s Blue Link this ain’t; the graphics are among the crispest in the industry, and while the touchscreen is within reach, there’s also a dial on the center console with integrated handwriting recognition to move between menus.

The system itself is quick to boot, quick to respond and positively loaded with clever tricks. The Sounds of Nature feature fills the cabin with the ambience of a crackling fireplace or a walk through a snowy village, complete with the satisfying crunch sound of feet pushing through fresh powder. Weather and fuel prices arrive by way of the HD Radio antenna, and if you prefer a straightforward aesthetic, you can hide all that stuff by swiping to a home screen that shows you a map, the weather and what’s currently playing through the Lexicon audio system. The aesthetics alone put MBUX, iDrive and every other luxury automaker system to shame. Yes, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are along for the ride, but for once, you may want to stick with stock just to enjoy the view.The attention to detail in here is exquisite.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
The Prestige trim of G80 also includes a digital gauge cluster. While it’s neat that it can show me just about any piece of information I need on the adjustable bit nestled between the virtual dials, the cluster packs a feature that no other automaker has: A depth effect. The gauges can be configured to display in a layered, three-dimensional look that puts different parts of the cluster at seemingly different depths. Sure, it’s a parlor trick (one that can be turned off if it’s too much for your eyes), but hot damn, it’s about the coolest gimmick I’ve seen in some time.My G80 also comes with a number of advanced driver aids. The Highway Driving Assistant suite combines standard adaptive cruise control with lane-keeping assist and active lane-change assist to help reduce the tedium of highway driving. While I think the lane-centering is perhaps a bit too aggressive in how it applies torque to the steering wheel, the whole shebang is smooth as silk, preferring steadiness in its acceleration and deceleration over outright hustle. When all the systems are engaged, the gauge cluster will display not only the G80 itself, but the curvature of the road and the location of every vehicle within range of its radar and cameras.The 3.5-liter, twin-turbo V6 makes 375 horsepower.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
Soft and smooth on the roadMy top-trim tester packs a 3.5-liter, twin-turbocharged V6 producing a sufficient 375 horsepower and 391 pound-feet of torque. It’s a potent powerplant, shoving the G80 forward regardless of the current speed or the tachometer needle’s location. It even makes a cool sound in the process, although I recommend turning off the built-in sound enhancement, since it can get a little obnoxious in any of its modes. There’s a 2.5-liter turbo I4 offered across the G80’s lineup, as well; stay tuned for a review of that setup soon.Sure, motive force is important, but what really helps the G80 stand out from the competition is how smooth the entire experience is. Every chunk of the driving experience is tailored for comfort. Gear changes from the eight-speed automatic transmission are quick and practically imperceptible. Leave the G80 in its default Comfort mode, and the optional adaptive suspension does such a great job at softening the road that I originally thought it was air-based. Road and wind noise barely permeates the cabin, making for quite the serene experience.Sure, there’s a Sport mode, and it does a good job of tightening the reins and flattening the car’s standard nautical nature, but… why? Just leave it be and bask in a ride quality that feels cushier than what BMW or Audi can muster with costlier and more complex arrangements. It’s so easy to drive the G80 smoothly that you’ll feel like a master chauffeur in no time.The Genesis G80 should put other luxury rivals on notice.
Andrew Krok/Roadshow
Down to brass tacksI wouldn’t blame you for assuming this is one expensive car, but it really isn’t. The 2021 G80 starts at $48,725 including destination, stretching to a still-sensible $68,675 for my fully loaded 3.5T AWD Prestige trim.The midsize executive luxury sedan segment is filled to the brim with celebrities. Half a decade ago, you might think me crazy for saying the G80 (née Hyundai Genesis) could mount a proper offensive against stalwarts like the Audi A6, BMW 5 Series and Mercedes-Benz E-Class. But 2020 is a year of surprises, and the 2021 Genesis G80 provides a full luxury experience that instantly launches it into the thick of a competitive set. Whether buyers will be willing to give up the cachet that comes with, say, a three-pointed star on the hood remains to be seen, but if someone doesn’t at least put the Genesis up for consideration against these rivals, they’d be doing themselves a disservice. 

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Echo Dot vs. Nest Mini: Putting Amazon’s and Google’s smart speakers to the test – CNET

The fall season is upon us, which inevitably brings new smart speakers and displays from tech giants like Google, Amazon and Apple. The first two, Google and Amazon, compete in a unique way — with the budget smart speaker. $50 smart speakers like the Amazon Echo Dot and Nest Mini have made smart home tech,…

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Echo Dot vs. Nest Mini: Putting Amazon’s and Google’s smart speakers to the test     – CNET

The fall season is upon us, which inevitably brings new smart speakers and displays from tech giants like Google, Amazon and Apple. The first two, Google and Amazon, compete in a unique way — with the budget smart speaker. $50 smart speakers like the Amazon Echo Dot and Nest Mini have made smart home tech, a traditionally pricey category, much more accessible to average consumers. In fact, if you have a smart speaker on your countertop at home, chances are it’s one of these two budget options.The competition is fierce: the past four years have seen Amazon and Google go tit-for-tat with their bite-size speakers, with the second-gen Dot, the Google Home Mini, the third-gen Dot and finally the Nest Mini. But now, in 2020, Amazon has launched yet another wallet-friendly smart speaker, the fourth-gen Echo Dot. For the same $50 price as always, it boasts a larger speaker than ever before and a new, spheroidal shape.

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The question is, pitted against last year’s still competitive Nest Mini, which speaker is better? Let’s find out.

Chris Monroe/CNET

Amazon’s Echo Dot is impressive as ever. Its 1.6-inch speaker is half an inch larger than the previous generation’s, and it’s a few millimeters larger than the Nest Mini’s 1.58-inch speaker. Practically, this new Dot sounds fuller, with a slightly stronger bass than the Nest Mini — though the Nest Mini still offers comparable distinction to midrange tracks, such as in acoustic or classical music. The Dot also features a 3mm audio input for connecting to bigger, better speakers, which is a nice touch for audiophiles.The biggest difference, though, is in voice assistant. The Echo Dot uses Alexa, Amazon’s assistant, which can do pretty much everything you need a voice assistant to do — control smart home devices, answer questions, play music and so on. Alexa can also do a few unique things, like listen for break-ins and check delivery statuses for Amazon Prime packages. If you have a Fire TV device, you can also tell Alexa to stream shows on your TV. Basically, Alexa is as smart as ever in the new Echo Dot.The new Dot also features a new, spheroidal profile — it’s not exactly revelatory, but it’s a welcome evolution. For $50, the whole package is great: it would’ve been hard to imagine getting a speaker this good for this price only a few years ago.Read our full Echo Dot (2020) review.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Google’s Nest Mini, even a year from its release, is still a great smart speaker. It features strong clarity of sound for the size and price, and a surprisingly ample bass. Otherwise, a lot of the design features are similar to the Echo Dot: you have the cloth-topped design (made of recycled plastic), in coral, charcoal, chalk and a new blue hue called sky. An ultrasound sensor system built into the top of the Nest Mini can also detect when you’re standing close to it, and then activate a pair of LEDs that point out the touch-based volume controls on top of the speaker. They were harder to find on the Home Mini, which lacked that feature.An integrated bracket on the underside of the new Nest Mini makes it officially wall-mountable, but it doesn’t have the 3mm audio jack for plugging into bigger, better speakers — and that’s a big disappointment for audiophiles looking to add Google Assistant to older, non-smart speakers.Google Assistant is marginally more naturalistic than Alexa, but they can basically do the same things. Unlike Alexa, Google Assistant works well with Google services and platforms like Calendar, Gmail and more — and it can work with Chromecast devices, as Alexa works with Fire TV devices.Read our full Nest Mini review.

Which is better?Disappointing as it may be to say, which device is better for you will likely come down to your preferred voice assistant. If you use Google platforms often, the Nest Mini adds a great deal of day-to-day administrative smarts that the Echo Dot can’t match. But if you’re more concerned about Amazon shopping, especially as we approach the holiday season, the Echo Dot will serve your needs better.If the speakers are measured simply on their hardware, the Echo Dot has to get the nod for the slightly improved sound quality and the audio in/out jack, which makes listening to music better on Amazon’s device. But again, if one device is on sale (as Google’s Nest Mini is at the time of this article’s writing), then even a slight difference in price could legitimately swing the right decision one way or the other.To see Google’s and Amazon’s full-size smart speakers compared, read our in-depth comparison.

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The best coffee maker for 2020: Bunn, Bonavita, Ninja, Oxo and more – CNET

Whipping up quality pots of coffee isn’t easy. Coffee grounds need to hit hot water for an optimal length of time. That water must be within a precise temperature range too. Only a handful of drip coffee makers can pull off this sort of alchemy. And the ones that don’t (which is the vast majority) serve pots that…

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The best coffee maker for 2020: Bunn, Bonavita, Ninja, Oxo and more     – CNET

Whipping up quality pots of coffee isn’t easy. Coffee grounds need to hit hot water for an optimal length of time. That water must be within a precise temperature range too. Only a handful of drip coffee makers can pull off this sort of alchemy. And the ones that don’t (which is the vast majority) serve pots that taste truly awful.We’ve found some noteworthy exceptions on the market, so whether you want to brew perfect lattes, make iced coffee or turn coffee beans into the ideal cup of fresh coffee, you don’t need to spend a mint to get the best coffee maker. You can drop almost $500 on a tricked-out Ratio Eight that’s as beautiful as it is capable, or on a programmable commercial coffee maker. But all it takes is $15 to get Oxo’s superb Single Serve Pour Over funnel.

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And there are plenty of compelling choices in between for a coffee lover’s brew. One is our Editors’ Choice winner, the Oxo Brew 8-Cup, our pick for best all-around automatic brewer. Another is the KitchenAid Siphon Brewer, which uses an ancient technique to achieve outstanding and dramatic results. No matter your budget, there’s a coffee machine on this list that’ll fit your drip needs perfectly and be the best coffee maker for you. We’ll periodically update the list with new products as we test them. We promise, you’ll never have to drink coffee from pods or an ancient coffee pot again.

Brian Bennett/CNET

The Oxo Brew 8-Cup Coffee Maker delivers SCA Golden Cup-rated coffee that tastes just as good coffee from our previous favorite, the Bonavita Connoisseur, but Oxo’s new brewer is more thoughtfully designed. This drip machine also comes with a special single cup filter basket for Kalita Wave filters. The Oxo Brew is compact, stylish, and also sturdy, plus it comes with a thermal carafe that doesn’t drip or spill. 

Read our Oxo 8 Cup Coffee Maker review.

Those who seek lots of coffee in a hurry will love the quick brew cycle of this coffee maker. The Bunn Velocity Brew BT drip coffee maker with its stainless steel-lined thermal carafe whips up a large coffee pot of joe at astonishing speed. In as little as 3 minutes, 33 seconds, the coffee maker can deliver full batches of tasty drip to drink.

Read our Bunn Velocity Brew BT review.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

It’s hard to find a coffee maker that beats the KitchenAid Siphon Brewer’s unique combination of spectacle and quality. It makes a coffee pot of distinctly rich, deep and seductively flavorful coffee. Its vintage brewing process, based on vapor pressure and vacuum suction, is also mesmerizing to watch. No paper filters needed as the Siphon Brewer comes with a reusable stainless steel filter.

Read our Kitchenaid Siphon Coffee Brewer review.

Chris Monroe/CNET

Think of this kitchen appliance as the Swiss army knife of the drip coffee maker world. The Ninja programmable brewer (with frother, thermal carafe and reusable filter) offers an uncanny degree of flexibility, making it the best coffee maker for those who don’t always want the same cup. It can create everything from solid drip, to perfect cold brew, to iced coffee, to latte-style drinks with its milk frother, and it will adjust the temperature according to your choice. Its thermal carafe will keep tea or coffee hot up to two hours. This programmable coffee maker even lets you brew iced coffee and hot coffee in multiple sizes, from small cups all the way up to full carafes.

Chris Monroe/CNET

Cold brew coffee is delicious, but it can be a pain to make. Oxo’s cold brew coffee maker takes much of the headache out of the process. This Oxo Brew coffee maker saturates coffee grounds evenly and lets you drain cold brewed coffee from them into its glass carafe with relative ease.

Read our Oxo Cold Brew Coffee Maker review.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Delicious coffee and great tasting drip from a product that costs just $15? It sounds unlikely but that’s just what the affordable Oxo Good Grips Pour-Over offers. It only makes coffee one drink at a time and requires you to provide the hot water. That said, the simple brewer transforms the otherwise complex task of pour-over into one that’s easy, clean and almost foolproof.

Read our Oxo Good Grips Pour-Over Coffee Maker review.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Judging by the Ratio Eight appliance, the people at Ratio believe that a coffee maker should be beautiful as well as functional. Starting at $495, each brewer is crafted from a selection of premium materials like walnut, mahogany and glass. (Both the water reservoir and carafe are made from hand-blown glass.) Their sturdy aluminum bases are available in numerous finishes as well. And yes, the Ratio Eight with its glass carafe also makes excellent drip.  

Read our Ratio Eight review.

Megan Wollerton/CNET

Dutch company Technivorm has sold exceptionally good drip coffee makers for decades. Its Moccamaster KBT 741 drip coffee machine sports a design with clean lines and sharp angles that harkens back to 1968, the year the first Moccamaster hit stores. Retro design aside, the Moccamaster KBT 741 consistently puts out perfect freshly brewed coffee that will satisfy coffee connoisseurs. Its stainless steel thermal carafe also keeps its contents hot a full six hours.

Read our Technivorm Moccamaster KBT 741 review.

A note on testing coffee makers Evaluating the performance of a coffee maker is trickier than it might sound. The first step is to know what good drip coffee actually is. According to the Specialty Coffee Association, there are criteria critical to brewing quality java. Mainly these are brewing time and water temperature. Hot water should come into contact with grounds for no less than four minutes and no longer than eight. Additionally, the ideal water temperature range is between 197 degrees Fahrenheit (92C) and 205 degrees Fahrenheit (96C). To confirm how each coffee maker meets that challenge, we log the length of their brew cycles. We also employ thermocouple heat sensors connected to industrial-grade data loggers. That enables us to record the temperature within the coffee grounds while brewing is underway. We measure the temperature inside the brewing chamber of every coffee maker we test.
Brian Bennett/CNET
After brewing coffee, we take sample readings of the produced coffee liquid with an optical refractometer. Given we factor in the amount of water and freshly ground coffee used, that data lets us calculate the Total Dissolved Solids percentage of each brew. From there we arrive at the extraction percentage. The ideal range is commonly thought to be between 18 and 20%. We also back up measured data with a good, old fashioned taste test. If the taste of a cup of coffee is bitter, there’s a good chance it was over extracted during the drip. On the opposite end, an under extracted cup of coffee will typically taste weak — it can even taste sour or have the flavor of soggy peanuts. And to be certain, we brew identical test runs a minimum of three times to achieve average results. More coffee recommendations

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